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Acute and chronic pancreatic disease associated with Yersinia enterocolitica infection: a Norwegian 10-year follow-up study of 458 hospitalized patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48600
Source
J Intern Med. 1992 May;231(5):537-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
A. Saebø
J. Lassen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Surgery, Bergen University Hospital, Norway.
Source
J Intern Med. 1992 May;231(5):537-41
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - etiology
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pancreatitis - diagnosis - etiology
Time Factors
Yersinia Infections - complications - diagnosis
Yersinia enterocolitica
Abstract
During the period 1974-1983, Yersinia enterocolitica infection was diagnosed in 458 hospitalized patients by antibody response or isolation of the micro-organism. Eight (1.75%) patients showed signs of acute pancreatitis with elevated serum or urine levels of amylase; two patients had acute insulin-dependent diabetes. The patients were followed up for 4-14 years (until 1987). Four patients were readmitted with chronic pancreatitis, and one with acute pancreatitis. Diabetes developed in two males and nine females; in seven cases this was associated with chronic conditions of possible autoimmune aetiology. In 1987 a significantly higher than expected prevalence of diabetes was demonstrated among female subjects aged 30-54 years. Yersinia enterocolitica infection constitutes a differential diagnosis in acute pancreatitis, and might be related to the development of chronic pancreatitis and diabetes.
PubMed ID
1602290 View in PubMed
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Antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter jejuni from humans and broilers in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171198
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2006 Feb;134(1):127-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
M. Norström
M. Hofshagen
T. Stavnes
J. Schau
J. Lassen
H. Kruse
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Zoonosis Centre, National Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway. madelaine.norstrom@vetinst.no
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2006 Feb;134(1):127-30
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Campylobacter - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Campylobacter Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Chickens
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Fluoroquinolones - pharmacology
Food Contamination
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Poultry Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
In this study comprising isolates from 2001 to 2003, resistance was considerably more widespread among Campylobacter jejuni from humans infected abroad than infected within Norway. The discrepancy was particularly notable for fluoroquinolone resistance (67.4% vs. 6.5%). This is probably a reflection of a low resistance prevalence in Norwegian broiler isolates (1.2% fluoroquinolone resistant).
Notes
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2001 Jan-Feb;7(1):24-3411266291
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 May;8(5):490-511996684
Cites: Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2002 Dec;33(4):752-712757222
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Aug 1;158(3):234-4212882945
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 May 20;340(20):1525-3210332013
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 1995 Jan;35(1):173-87768766
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 1995 Dec;36(6):891-88821589
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1998 Feb;26(2):341-59502453
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Dec;131(3):1181-614959786
PubMed ID
16409659 View in PubMed
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Clinical features of sporadic Campylobacter infections in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36945
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1992;24(6):741-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
G. Kapperud
J. Lassen
S M Ostroff
S. Aasen
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1992;24(6):741-9
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - microbiology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Campylobacter Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Diarrhea - microbiology
Feces - microbiology
Female
Fever - microbiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Travel
Abstract
To assess risk factors and clinical impact of campylobacteriosis in Norway, a case-control study of sporadic cases of infection with thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. was conducted. This report describes: (1) the frequency and duration of signs and symptoms, antimicrobial treatment, hospitalization, and faecal carriage among the study patients; (2) diarrhoeal illness and campylobacter carriage among their household members; and (3) antimicrobial susceptibility pattern among bacterial isolates. A total of 135 patients with bacteriologically confirmed campylobacter infection were enrolled in the study. Of these, 58 (43%) were domestically acquired while 77 (57%) were acquired abroad. If the study enrollees are representative of the cases reported to the national surveillance system, the reported infections led to an estimated annual average of at least 8590 days of illness, 78 admissions to hospital, 329 days of hospital stay, 2236 days lost at work or at school, 1000 physician consultations, and 96 antimicrobial prescriptions among the 4.2 million Norwegians. Convalescent carriage of campylobacter was detected in 16% of the patients who submitted follow-up stool specimens; the organism was carried for a mean of 37.6 days (median 31, range 15-69) after the onset of illness. Antimicrobial treatment appeared to have reduced the likelihood of carriage once symptoms had resolved. Diarrhoeal illness was more commonly reported in members of case households than control households (OR = 5.44, p
PubMed ID
1287808 View in PubMed
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Clinical features of sporadic Yersinia enterocolitica infections in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36569
Source
J Infect Dis. 1992 Oct;166(4):812-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
S M Ostroff
G. Kapperud
J. Lassen
S. Aasen
R V Tauxe
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia.
Source
J Infect Dis. 1992 Oct;166(4):812-7
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Registries
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology - physiopathology
Yersinia enterocolitica - isolation & purification
Abstract
During October 1988 through January 1990, a study of sporadic Yersinia enterocolitica infections was done in the Oslo region to assess the clinical impact and risk factors for this disease. Sixty-seven case-patients (mean age, 23.4 years) and 132 population-based age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled. Among patients who were well when interviewed, illness lasted a mean of 20 days, but 10% of the others remained symptomatic a year later. Bloody diarrhea occurred only in persons less than 18 years old (P = .002); joint pain was more common in adults (P = .001). Prolonged carriage was found in 47% of patients after resolution of symptoms. Patients were less likely to shed the organism after antimicrobial treatment (relative risk, 0.3; P = .003). Case-patients were more likely than controls to have antecedent enteric illness (odds ratio, 8.2; P less than .001). Y. enterocolitica infection in Norway is notable for its severity and chronicity. Postsymptomatic shedding, which occurs commonly, may be reduced by antimicrobial treatment.
PubMed ID
1527416 View in PubMed
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[Cohort studies--a Norwegian discovery? An unexpected glimpse from the early years of epidemiology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210358
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Dec 10;116(30):3687-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1996
Author
J. Lassen
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for bakteriologi Statens institutt for folkehelse, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Dec 10;116(30):3687-9
Date
Dec-10-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Epidemiology - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
9019889 View in PubMed
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Comparison of epidemiological marker methods for identification of Salmonella typhimurium isolates from an outbreak caused by contaminated chocolate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75633
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1989 Sep;27(9):2019-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1989
Author
G. Kapperud
J. Lassen
K. Dommarsnes
B E Kristiansen
D A Caugant
E. Ask
M. Jahkola
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1989 Sep;27(9):2019-24
Date
Sep-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Bacteriophage Typing
Bird Diseases - microbiology
Birds
Cacao
Comparative Study
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Disease Outbreaks
Finland
Food Contamination
Humans
Norway
Phenotype
Plants, Edible
Plasmids
Restriction Mapping
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - microbiology
Salmonella Infections, Animal - microbiology
Salmonella typhimurium - classification - enzymology - genetics
Serotyping
Abstract
Plasmid profile analysis, restriction endonuclease analysis, and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis were used in conjunction with serotyping, bacteriophage typing, and biochemical fingerprinting to trace epidemiologically related isolates of Salmonella typhimurium from an outbreak caused by contaminated chocolate products in Norway and Finland. To evaluate the efficiency of the epidemiological marker methods, isolates from the outbreak were compared with five groups of control isolates not known to be associated with the outbreak. Both plasmid profile analysis and phage typing provided further discrimination over that produced by serotyping and biochemical fingerprinting. Plasmid profile analysis and phage typing were equally reliable in differentiating the outbreak isolates from the epidemiologically unrelated controls and were significantly more effective than multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and restriction enzyme analysis of total DNA. The greatest differentiation was achieved when plasmid profile analysis and phage typing were combined to complement serotyping and biochemical fingerprinting. However, none of the methods employed, including restriction enzyme analysis of plasmid DNA, were able to distinguish the outbreak isolates from five isolates recovered in Norway and Finland over a period of years from dead passerine birds and a calf.
PubMed ID
2674198 View in PubMed
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Emerging antibiotic resistance in Salmonella typhimurium in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195652
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Dec;125(3):473-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
T M Leegaard
D A Caugnat
L O Frøholm
E A Høiby
J. Lassen
Author Affiliation
Department Bacteriology, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Dec;125(3):473-80
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Outbreaks
Drug Resistance, Multiple
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques
Retrospective Studies
Salmonella Infections - drug therapy
Salmonella typhimurium - drug effects - genetics - pathogenicity
Travel
Abstract
The antimicrobial resistance of 809 Salmonella Typhimurium isolates collected from humans in Norway between 1975 and 1998 was studied. The material was subdivided into domestic and foreign isolates according to whether the patient had recently travelled abroad or not. In imported isolates the largest increase in resistance was in 1996 when 35% of the isolates were multi-resistant. The first multi-resistant isolate acquired in Norway appeared in 1994, but already in 1998 23% of the isolates domestically acquired were multi-resistant, and a majority were S. Typhimurium DT104. We found no ciprofloxacin resistance in domestically acquired isolates. Amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis was performed on selected multi-resistant isolates. The method discriminated well between different multi-resistant isolates, but not between DT104 isolates. Resistant and multi-resistant S. Typhimurium were until 1998 essentially recovered from patients who had travelled abroad, but multi-resistant isolates, mainly DT104, are now also being transmitted within the country.
PubMed ID
11218197 View in PubMed
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Epidemiological aspects of enteritis due to Campylobacter spp. in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39913
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1984 Feb;19(2):153-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1984
Author
J. Lassen
G. Kapperud
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1984 Feb;19(2):153-6
Date
Feb-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Diarrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Enteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Seasons
Sex Factors
Travel
Abstract
Data pertaining to 249 patients with stool cultures positive for thermophilic campylobacters are presented. Campylobacters were isolated from about 3% of all cases of acute enteritis and occupied second place in the bacterial etiology of this syndrome following Salmonella spp. Concomitant isolation of salmonellae or shigellae or both was achieved in 40 (16.1%) of the patients infected with campylobacters. The results suggest a bimodal age distribution with highest rates in young adults aged 20 to 29 years and children below 10 years of age. A majority of the campylobacters were isolated from travellers returning from abroad, and, to a lesser extent, from immigrants, particularly from Asia. Immigrants accounted for 45.2% of the patients below 10 years of age. The number of cases increased during the warmer months of the year. Travelling habits could, at least in part, explain the observed seasonality, age distribution, and geographical origin of infection. Eight outbreaks of Campylobacter enteritis were detected, five of which were family outbreaks, whereas three involved people from different families.
PubMed ID
6699143 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of Salmonella typhimurium O:4-12 infection in Norway: evidence of transmission from an avian wildlife reservoir.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33936
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Apr 15;147(8):774-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1998
Author
G. Kapperud
H. Stenwig
J. Lassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Apr 15;147(8):774-82
Date
Apr-15-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Birds - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Reservoirs - veterinary
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology - transmission
Salmonella typhimurium - classification - isolation & purification
Seasons
Abstract
In 1987, a nationwide outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium O:4-12 infection traced to contaminated chocolate bars occurred in Norway. In the 5 years after the outbreak, elevated numbers of sporadic cases caused by the epidemic strain of Salmonella were detected, followed by a decline in subsequent years. To characterize the epidemiology of this infection, the authors analyzed information concerning all sporadic cases reported in Norway from 1966 to 1996. Of the 153 patients infected by the outbreak strain, 43% were less than 5 years of age, and only three persons had acquired the infection abroad. In contrast, 46% of the cases attributable to other S. typhimurium O:4-12 variants and 90% of the total number of Salmonella infections were related to foreign travel. A distinct seasonality was observed: 76% of the cases appeared between January and April. At the same time of year, the epidemic strain was regularly encountered as the etiologic agent of fatal salmonellosis among wild passerine birds, suggesting an epidemiologic link between the avian and human cases. The strain was rarely isolated from other sources. From 1990 to 1992, the authors conducted a prospective case-control study of sporadic indigenous infections to identify risk factors and obtain guidance for preventive efforts. Forty-one case-patients, each matched by age, sex, and geographic area with two population controls, were enrolled. In conditional logistic regression analysis, the following environmental factors were independently related to an increased risk of infection: drinking untreated water, having direct contact with wild birds or their droppings, and eating snow, sand, or soil. Cases were also more likely than controls to report having antecedent or concurrent medical disorders. Forty-six percent of the study patients were hospitalized for their salmonellosis.
PubMed ID
9554419 View in PubMed
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External quality assessment for clinical microbiological laboratories in Norway 1984.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60271
Source
NIPH Ann. 1985 Jun;8(1):27-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1985
Author
P. Sandven
J. Lassen
Source
NIPH Ann. 1985 Jun;8(1):27-35
Date
Jun-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conjunctivitis - microbiology
Feces - microbiology
Hospitals
Humans
Infant
Laboratories - standards
Microbiology - standards
Septicemia - microbiology
Suppuration - microbiology
Urethritis - microbiology
Wounds and Injuries - microbiology
Abstract
The results of the external quality assessment for clinical microbiology in Norway in 1984 are evaluated. Four distributions, each consisting of four simulated clinical specimens, were carried out. The assessment has, as in previous years, revealed some problem areas concerning laboratory procedures which are discussed.
PubMed ID
4058788 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.