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13 records – page 1 of 2.

Aspirin-intolerant asthma in the population: prevalence and important determinants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266365
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Jan;45(1):211-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
J. Eriksson
L. Ekerljung
A. Bossios
A. Bjerg
G. Wennergren
E. Rönmark
K. Torén
J. Lötvall
B. Lundbäck
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Jan;45(1):211-9
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Asthma, Aspirin-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Occupational Exposure
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Population-based studies on aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA) are very few, and no previous population study has investigated risk factors for the condition.
To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of AIA in the general population.
A questionnaire on respiratory health was mailed to 30,000 randomly selected subjects aged 16-75 years in West Sweden, 29,218 could be traced and 18,087 (62%) responded. The questionnaire included questions on asthma, respiratory symptoms, aspirin-induced dyspnoea and possible determinants.
The prevalence of AIA was 0.5%, 0.3% in men and 0.6% in women (P = 0.014). Sick leave, emergency visits due to asthma and all investigated lower respiratory symptoms were more common in AIA than in aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA). Obesity was a strong risk factor for AIA (BMI > 35: odds ratio (OR) 12.1; 95% CI 2.49-58.5), and there was a dose-response relationship between increasing body mass index (BMI) and risk of AIA. Obesity, airborne occupational exposure and visible mould at home were considerably stronger risk factors for AIA than for ATA. Current smoking was a risk factor for AIA (OR 2.55; 95% CI 1.47-4.42), but not ATA.
Aspirin-intolerant asthma identified in the general population was associated with a high burden of symptoms, uncontrolled disease and a high morbidity. Increasing BMI increased the risk of AIA in a dose-response manner. A number of risk factors, including obesity and current smoking, were considerably stronger for AIA than for ATA.
PubMed ID
24961377 View in PubMed
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Bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway wall remodelling induced by exposure to allergen for 9 weeks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15634
Source
Allergy. 1999 Oct;54(10):1074-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
Z H Cui
B E Skoogh
T. Pullerits
J. Lötvall
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 1999 Oct;54(10):1074-82
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airway Resistance
Allergens - adverse effects
Animals
Antibodies - blood
Bronchi - pathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - blood - immunology - pathology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Male
Muscle, Smooth - pathology
Phthalic Anhydrides - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory System - pathology
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Time Factors
Abstract
Prolonged exposure to allergen has been proposed to be important for the development of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway remodelling in asthma. The present study was designed to examine the effect of chronic allergen exposure on bronchial responsiveness, eosinophil infiltration, and airway remodelling. We sensitized brown Norway rats with the occupational allergen trimellitic anhydride (TMA) and exposed the animals to TMA conjugated to rat serum albumin (TMA-RSA) on 5 consecutive days each week for 9 weeks, starting 4 weeks after sensitization. IgE and IgG anti-TMA antibodies in serum and bronchial responsiveness to acetylcholine were evaluated before and at weeks 3, 6, and 9 of allergen exposure. Thickness of the airway wall, airway luminal narrowing, and the number of goblet cells and eosinophils in the airway wall were evaluated with an image analysis system in lungs resected after the last assessment of bronchial responsiveness, at the end of the 9-week allergen exposure. All rats developed IgE and IgG anti-TMA antibodies after sensitization. The levels of antibodies increased with allergen exposure until week 6, and then declined. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine was induced in allergen-exposed rats without ongoing airway eosinophilia. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness induced by chronic allergen exposure via inhalation was accompanied by significantly increased thickness of smooth muscle and airway narrowing in the small airways, and goblet cell hyperplasia in the large airways. We conclude that chronic exposure to allergen can induce bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway wall remodelling. Airway wall remodelling may contribute to bronchial hyperresponsiveness.
PubMed ID
10536886 View in PubMed
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Bronchial hyperresponsiveness, epithelial damage, and airway eosinophilia after single and repeated allergen exposure in a rat model of anhydride-induced asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15788
Source
Allergy. 1997 Jul;52(7):739-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
Z H Cui
M. Sjöstrand
T. Pullerits
P. Andius
B E Skoogh
J. Lötvall
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 1997 Jul;52(7):739-46
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bronchi - immunology - pathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - immunology - pathology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Eosinophilia - immunology
Epithelium - pathology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Male
Phthalic Anhydrides - administration & dosage - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - immunology - pathology
Vaccination
Abstract
Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and damage of the epithelium, as well as eosinophilia in the airway wall, induced by trimellitic anhydride (TMA) in sensitized brown Norway rats were studied. Rats were challenged once or seven times with aerosol of TMA conjugated to rat serum albumin (TMA-RSA) 3 weeks after intradermal TMA sensitization. Airway responsiveness (-log PC300 of acetylcholine i.v.) was measured 24 h after allergen challenge. Epithelial lesion and eosinophil infiltration in the airway walls were quantified under light microscopy, and TMA-specific IgE and IgG in serum were evaluated with ELISA. High levels of TMA-specific IgE and IgG were found in all rats in the sensitized groups compared to nonsensitized groups (P
PubMed ID
9265989 View in PubMed
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Bystander suppression of occupational hapten sensitization in rats made tolerant to ovalbumin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15703
Source
Eur Respir J. 1998 Oct;12(4):889-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
T. Pullerits
S. Lundin
Z H Cui
U. Dahlgren
E. Telemo
J. Lötvall
Author Affiliation
Dept of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1998 Oct;12(4):889-94
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airway Resistance - immunology
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Comparative Study
Disease Models, Animal
Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic
Eosinophils - immunology
Haptens - immunology
Hypersensitivity, Delayed - immunology
Immune Tolerance - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Male
Occupational Diseases - immunology
Ovalbumin - immunology
Phthalic Anhydrides - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - immunology
Abstract
Feeding a soluble antigen to an animal is known to cause a state of unresponsiveness against this antigen. If this antigen is given together with another antigen during the sensitization procedure, impairment of the response to the new antigen can also be seen, a phenomenon referred to as bystander suppression. The induction of tolerance against ovalbumin (OvA) and the effect of bystander suppression on the response to the hapten trimellitic anhydride (TMA), a cause of occupational asthma, were studied in Brown-Norway rats. Rats were fed either OvA-containing pellets or standard diet for 16 days before sensitization with the mixture of TMA and OvA. The animals were followed for 6 weeks after sensitization. Animals made tolerant to OvA showed a significantly suppressed delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction against both OvA and TMA compared with the nontolerized control group at 5 weeks after sensitization, implying bystander suppression. By contrast, immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG antibody levels were suppressed only against OvA, whereas anti-TMA antibody levels were not affected. Airway eosinophilia after a single aerosol challenge at 6 weeks after sensitization using TMA conjugated to rat serum albumin, correlated with IgE anti-TMA levels in the group made tolerant to OvA and was not affected by OvA ingestion. In conclusion, suppressive factors released in ovalbumin-tolerant rats when they are challenged with ovalbumin, can suppress the response to trimellitic anhydride and this suppression is more pronounced for T-helper1-type responses.
PubMed ID
9817164 View in PubMed
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Cigarette smoking is associated with high prevalence of chronic rhinitis and low prevalence of allergic rhinitis in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116938
Source
Allergy. 2013 Mar;68(3):347-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
J. Eriksson
L. Ekerljung
B-M Sundblad
J. Lötvall
K. Torén
E. Rönmark
K. Larsson
B. Lundbäck
Author Affiliation
Krefting Research Centre / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. jonas.eriksson@lungall.gu.se
Source
Allergy. 2013 Mar;68(3):347-54
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Allergens - immunology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Immunization
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Public Health Surveillance
Questionnaires
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The harmful effects of tobacco smoke on human health, including respiratory health, are extensive and well documented. Previous data on the effect of smoking on rhinitis and allergic sensitization are inconsistent. We sought to investigate how smoking correlates with prevalence of allergic and chronic rhinitis among adults in Sweden.
The study population comprised 27 879 subjects derived from three large randomly selected cross-sectional population surveys conducted in Sweden between 2006 and 2008. The same postal questionnaire on respiratory health was used in the three surveys, containing questions about obstructive respiratory diseases, rhinitis, respiratory symptoms and possible determinants of disease, including smoking habits. A random sample from one of the cohorts underwent a clinical examination including skin prick testing.
Smoking was associated with a high prevalence of chronic rhinitis in both men and women and a low prevalence of allergic rhinitis in men. These associations were dose dependent and remained when adjusted for a number of possible confounders in multiple logistic regression analysis. Prevalence of chronic rhinitis was lowest in nonsmokers and highest in very heavy smokers (18.5% vs 34.5%, P
PubMed ID
23346908 View in PubMed
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Development of antigen-specific IgE after sensitisation with trimellitic anhydride in rats is attenuated by glucocorticoids and cyclosporin A.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15809
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 1997 Mar;112(3):279-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
T. Pullerits
U. Dahlgren
B E Skoogh
J. Lötvall
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 1997 Mar;112(3):279-86
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Antibody Formation - drug effects
Betamethasone - pharmacology
Cyclosporine - pharmacology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Epitopes
Female
Glucocorticoids - pharmacology
Immunization
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Male
Phthalic Anhydrides - administration & dosage - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is a low-molecular-weight compound capable of inducing occupational asthma in man. We have characterized the TMA-induced antibody responses in Brown-Norway rats (BNR) and evaluated the effects of treatment with the glucocorticoid betamethasone or with cyclosporin A (CsA) on this response. METHODS: Animals were sensitised by two intradermal injections of 0.1 ml TMA suspended in corn oil, and development of specific antibodies was assessed using ELISA. RESULTS: Both IgE and IgG anti-TMA antibodies started to rise between weeks 1 and 3 after immunisation, reached their highest levels 7 weeks after sensitisation with 3% of TMA and then started to decline. Betamethasone and CsA given orally over the time of sensitisation (8 days in total) inhibited the development of specific IgE and IgG anti-TMA antibodies. Betamethasone given 10-17 days after sensitisation attenuated the IgE and IgG antibody responses as well while treatment with CsA after sensitisation had no effect on the production of specific antibodies. Levels of total IgE and IgG were not affected except for a small decrease in total IgE using medium-dose betamethasone after sensitisation. CONCLUSION: We conclude that TMA-sensitised BNR develop specific IgE and IgG anti-TMA antibodies, and that glucocorticoids and CsA attenuate this response.
PubMed ID
9066515 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dyspnoea, asthma, and bronchospasm in relation to treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15979
Source
BMJ. 1994 Jan 1;308(6920):18-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-1994
Author
H. Lunde
T. Hedner
O. Samuelsson
J. Lötvall
L. Andrén
L. Lindholm
B E Wiholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
BMJ. 1994 Jan 1;308(6920):18-21
Date
Jan-1-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - adverse effects
Asthma - chemically induced
Bronchial Spasm - chemically induced
Captopril - adverse effects
Cough - chemically induced
Dyspnea - chemically induced
Enalapril - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Lisinopril - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Ramipril - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the occurrence of asthma and dyspnoea precipitated or worsened by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. DESIGN--Summary of reports of adverse respiratory reaction in relation to treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors that were submitted to Swedish Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee and to World Health Organisation's international drug information system until 1992. Sales of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in Sweden were also summarised. SUBJECTS--Patients receiving angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors who reported adverse respiratory reactions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Clinical characteristics of adverse reactions of asthma, bronchospasm, and dyspnoea. RESULTS--In Sweden 424 adverse respiratory reactions were reported, of which most (374) were coughing. However, 36 patients had adverse drug reactions diagnosed as asthma, bronchospasm, or dyspnoea. In 33 of these cases the indication for treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors was hypertension, in only three heart failure. The respiratory symptoms occurred in about half of the patients within the first two weeks of treatment, and about one third needed hospitalisation or drug treatment. Dyspnoea symptoms occurred in conjunction with other symptoms from the airways or skin in 23 out of the 36 cases. In the WHO database there were 318 reports of asthma or bronchospasm, 516 reports of dyspnoea, and 7260 reports of cough in relation to 11 different angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. CONCLUSION--Symptoms of airway obstruction in relation to treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors seem to be a rare but potentially serious reaction generally occurring within the first few weeks of treatment.
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 1994 Feb 26;308(6928):593-48148691
PubMed ID
8298346 View in PubMed
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Eczema among adults: prevalence, risk factors and relation to airway diseases. Results from a large-scale population survey in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126618
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2012 Jun;166(6):1301-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
E P Rönmark
L. Ekerljung
J. Lötvall
G. Wennergren
E. Rönmark
K. Torén
B. Lundbäck
Author Affiliation
Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 424, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden. erik.ronmark@gu.se
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2012 Jun;166(6):1301-8
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Eczema - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Rhinitis - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In contrast to asthma and rhinitis, few studies among adults investigating the prevalence and risk factors of eczema have been published.
To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of eczema among adults in West Sweden. A further aim was to study the associations between asthma, rhinitis and eczema.
A questionnaire on respiratory health was mailed in 2008 to 30,000 randomly selected subjects in West Sweden aged 16-75 years; 62% responded. The questionnaire included questions about eczema, respiratory symptoms and diseases and their possible determinants. A subgroup of 669 subjects underwent skin prick testing against common airborne allergens.
'Eczema ever' was reported by 40·7% and 'current eczema' by 11·5%. Both conditions were significantly more common among women. The prevalence decreased with increasing age. The coexistence of both asthma and rhinitis with eczema was common. The main risk factors were family history of allergy and asthma. The dominant environmental risk factor was occupational exposure to gas, dust or fumes. Smoking increased the risk. Eczema was associated with urbanization, while growing up on a farm was associated with a decreased risk. Added one by one to the multivariate model, asthma, allergic rhinitis and any positive skin prick test were associated with eczema.
Eczema among adults is a common disease with more women than men having and having had eczema. Eczema is associated with other atopic diseases and with airway symptoms. Hereditary factors and exposure to gas, dust and fumes are associated with eczema.
PubMed ID
22372948 View in PubMed
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Growing up on a farm leads to lifelong protection against allergic rhinitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96856
Source
Allergy. 2010 May 17;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2010
Author
J. Eriksson
L. Ekerljung
J. Lötvall
T. Pullerits
G. Wennergren
E. Rönmark
K. Torén
B. Lundbäck
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine/Krefting Research Centre, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 2010 May 17;
Date
May-17-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To cite this article: Eriksson J, Ekerljung L, L?tvall J, Pullerits T, Wennergren G, R?nmark E, Tor?n K, Lundb?ck B. Growing up on a farm leads to lifelong protection against allergic rhinitis. Allergy 2010; DOI: 10.1111/j.1398-9995.2010.02397.x. Abstract Background: Various studies have reported a low prevalence of allergic rhinitis in farmers and farmers' children. We sought to investigate whether the protective effect of childhood farm environment is conserved throughout adulthood and how it corresponds to different degrees of urbanization. Methods: A questionnaire on respiratory health was mailed in 2008 to 30 000 randomly selected subjects aged 16-75 in West Sweden, 29 218 could be traced and 18 087 (62%) responded. The questionnaire included questions on allergic rhinitis, asthma, respiratory symptoms and possible determinants. Results: When stratified into age groups of 15 years, subjects that lived on a farm during their first 5 years of life had a lower prevalence of allergic rhinitis in all groups, even among the oldest (61-75 years). The negative correlation between childhood farm living and prevalence of allergic rhinitis was similar in 46-75 years of age (OR 0.82; 95% CI 0.70-0.95) as in 16-45 years of age (OR 0.78; 0.64-0.95). There was a significant trend of increasing prevalence of allergic rhinitis with increasing degree of urbanization independent of the effect of childhood farm living. Conclusions: We found a lifelong protective effect of childhood farm living on the prevalence of allergic rhinitis. In addition, we found an increasing prevalence of allergic rhinitis with increasing degree of urbanization both in those raised on a farm and those not, thus emphasizing the influence of both childhood and adult exposure for the development of allergic disease.
PubMed ID
20497148 View in PubMed
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Increase in pollen sensitization in Swedish adults and protective effect of keeping animals in childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287885
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2016 Oct;46(10):1328-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
A. Bjerg
L. Ekerljung
J. Eriksson
J. Näslund
S. Sjölander
E. Rönmark
Å. Dahl
K. Holmberg
G. Wennergren
K. Torén
M P Borres
J. Lötvall
B. Lundbäck
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2016 Oct;46(10):1328-36
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Immunization
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pets - immunology
Pollen - immunology
Prevalence
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Risk
Skin Tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To date, most studies of the 'allergy epidemic' have been based on self-reported data. There is still limited knowledge on time trends in allergic sensitization, especially among adults.
To study allergic sensitization, its risk factors and time trends in prevalence.
Within West Sweden Asthma Study (WSAS), a population-based sample of 788 adults (17-60 years) underwent skin prick tests (SPTs) for 11 aeroallergens 2009-2012. Specific IgE was analysed in 750 of the participants. Those aged 20-46 years (n = 379) were compared with the European Community Respiratory Health Survey sample aged 20-46 year from the same area (n = 591) in 1991-1992.
Among those aged 20-46 years, the prevalence of positive SPT to pollen increased, timothy from 17.1% to 29.0% (P
PubMed ID
27159904 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.