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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Age at natural menopause and sociodemographic status in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219109
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Jan 1;139(1):64-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-1994
Author
R. Luoto
J. Kaprio
A. Uutela
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Jan 1;139(1):64-76
Date
Jan-1-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Body mass index
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Menopause
Middle Aged
Smoking
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Differences in age at natural menopause by occupation, education, and place of residence were examined using a cross-sectional population sample of Finnish women aged 45-64 years (n = 1,713, response rate 86%). The sample was selected at random from the Finnish Population Register in 1989 (final n = 1,505, 75%). Kaplan-Meier estimates showed the median age at natural menopause to be 51 years for all women (95% confidence interval (CI) 50.6-51.4). The median menopausal age of smokers and nulliparous women was 50 years; that of nonsmokers and women whose first full-term pregnancy occurred before the age of 25 years was 52 years. Differences between occupational and educational groups were statistically significant (Mantel-Cox test for occupation, p 11 years) it was 0.75 (95% CI 0.59-0.96), adjusted to reflect smoking, use of hormones, body mass index, and age at first full-term pregnancy. Sociodemographic variables appear to be associated with age at natural menopause in a representative sample of Finnish women.
PubMed ID
8296776 View in PubMed
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Cause-specific mortality by marital status and social class in Finland during 1969--1971.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246676
Source
Soc Sci Med Med Psychol Med Sociol. 1979 Nov;13A(6):691-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979

Cigarette smoking, use of alcohol, and leisure-time physical activity among same-sexed adult male twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244998
Source
Prog Clin Biol Res. 1981;69 Pt C:37-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981

Common genetic influences on BMI and age at menarche.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214205
Source
Hum Biol. 1995 Oct;67(5):739-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
J. Kaprio
A. Rimpelä
T. Winter
R J Viken
M. Rimpelä
R J Rose
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Hum Biol. 1995 Oct;67(5):739-53
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland
Humans
Menarche - genetics - physiology
Reproducibility of Results
Twins - genetics
Abstract
Genetic influences on variability of body weight and onset of menarche are well known. To investigate the genetic and environmental contributions to the association of body weight with onset of menarche, we studied Finnish twins from consecutive birth cohorts (the FinnTwin16 study) ascertained from the national population registry, which identifies nearly 100% of all living twins. Baseline questionnaires were mailed to the twins within 60 days of their sixteenth birthday and later to older sibs of the twins. Pairwise response rates (approximately 85% across gender and zygosity) and 30 months of data collection yielded results from 1283 twin pairs. The questionnaires included a survey of health habits and attitudes, a symptom checklist, MMPI personality scales, and a survey of relationships with parents, peers, and the co-twin. Age at menarche was reported by 468 monozygotic (MZ) girls, 378 girls from like-sex dizygotic (FDZ) pairs, 434 girls from opposite-sex (OSDZ) pairs, and 141 older female sibs of the twins. The one-month test-retest reliability of age at menarche in an independent sample (N = 136) of 16-year-olds from a national survey was 0.96. Girls from OSDZ pairs had a significantly higher mean age at menarche (13.33 yr) than FDZ girls (13.13 yr) (difference, 0.20 yr; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.35). The MZ correlation for age at menarche was 0.75, the DZ correlation was 0.31, and the sib-twin correlation was 0.32. A bivariate twin analysis of age at menarche and body mass index (wt/ht2) indicated that 37% of the variance in age at menarche can be attributed to additive genetic effects, 37% to dominance effects, and 26% to unique environmental effects. The correlation between additive genetic effects on age at menarche and body mass index was 0.57, indicating a substantial proportion of genetic effects in common.
PubMed ID
8543288 View in PubMed
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Endurance running ability at adolescence as a predictor of blood pressure levels and hypertension in men: a 25-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173692
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2005 Jul-Aug;26(6):448-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Mikkelsson
J. Kaprio
H. Kautiainen
H. Nupponen
M J Tikkanen
U M Kujala
Author Affiliation
Pajulahti Sports Centre, Finland. kesto@sci.fi
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2005 Jul-Aug;26(6):448-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Blood pressure
Child
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Life Style
Male
Odds Ratio
Physical Endurance
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Risk factors
Running - statistics & numerical data
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
The aim was to study whether aerobic fitness measured by a maximal endurance running test at adolescence predicts prevalence of hypertension or blood pressure levels in adulthood. From the 413 (197 slow runners and 216 fast runners) participating in a 2000-meter running test at adolescence in 1976 and responding to a health and fitness questionnaire in 2001, 29 subjects (15 very slow runners and 14 very fast runners) participated in a clinical follow-up study in 2001. Compared to those who were fast runners in adolescence, those who were slow runners tended to have higher age-adjusted risk of hypertension at follow-up (OR 2.7, 95 % CI 0.9 to 7.5; p=0.07). The result persisted after further adjustment for body mass index at follow-up (OR 2.9, 95 % CI 1.0 to 8.3; p=0.05). Diastolic blood pressure was higher for very slow runners at adolescence compared to very fast runners, the age-adjusted mean diastolic blood pressure being 90 mm Hg (95 % CI 86 to 93) vs. 83 mm Hg (95 % CI 80 to 87), age-adjusted p=0.013. High endurance type fitness in adolescence predicts low risk of hypertension and low resting diastolic blood pressure levels in adult men.
PubMed ID
16037886 View in PubMed
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Genetic contribution to the relationship between personality and depressive symptoms among older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148116
Source
Psychol Med. 2010 Aug;40(8):1357-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
I. Pakkala
S. Read
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
M. Kauppinen
T. Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Psychol Med. 2010 Aug;40(8):1357-66
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Character
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Extraversion (Psychology)
Female
Finland
Gender Identity
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Neurotic Disorders - genetics - psychology
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
Prior studies suggest that certain types of personality are at higher risk for developing depressive disorders. This study examined the relationship between old age depressive symptoms and two middle-age personality dimensions, neuroticism and extraversion.
The present study is part of the Finnish Twin Study on Aging, where altogether 409 female twins who had completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory at the age of 38-51 years were studied for depressive symptoms 28 years later using Center for the Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Logistic regression analysis suitable for dependent data and univariate and Cholesky models for decomposing the genetic and environmental factor were used.
Middle age extraversion protected from later depressive symptoms while neuroticism increased the risk. Twin modeling indicated that the association between neuroticism and depressive symptoms resulted from shared genetic risk factors common to both traits. However, a substantial proportion of the genetic vulnerability was specific to old age depressive symptoms and was not shared with neuroticism. Middle age extraversion had no genetic relationship with old age depressive symptoms.
The relationship between middle age neuroticism and old age depressive symptoms is strong but only partly the result of genetic factors that predispose to both neuroticism and depressive symptoms. Extraversion, by contrast, has no genetic relationship with depressive symptoms experienced in old age.
PubMed ID
19811701 View in PubMed
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Genetic influences on use and abuse of alcohol: a study of 5638 adult Finnish twin brothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234939
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1987 Aug;11(4):349-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1987
Author
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
H. Langinvainio
K. Romanov
S. Sarna
R J Rose
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1987 Aug;11(4):349-56
Date
Aug-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - genetics
Diseases in Twins
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Twins, Dizygotic - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - psychology
Abstract
To evaluate genetic influences on the use and abuse of alcohol, we compared questionnaire measures of the frequency, quantity, and density of social drinking, and the frequency of alcohol-induced passouts self-reported by 879 monozygotic (MZ) and 1940 dizygotic (DZ) pairs of twin brothers, aged 24-49 yr. The measures of frequency, quantity, and density (heavy drinking once or more a month) significantly intercorrelate, and the self-reported alcohol consumption by this sample is satisfactorily stable and consistent with nationwide sales figures. None of the drinking measures was associated with twin type (zygosity), and only density correlated with age. Similarity of drinking habits among twin brothers was evaluated as a function of their genetic resemblance and age, the frequency of their social contact with one another, and the interactions of these terms. The effects were estimated from hierarchical linear regressions of a double-entry data matrix from which each twin's drinking was predicted from that of his twin brother, and that pair's age, zygosity, cohabitation status, and frequency of social contact. Significant genetic variance was found for each of the drinking measures with heritability estimates ranging from 0.36 to 0.40. Co-twins in more frequent social contact with one another reported greater similarity in their use of alcohol, but heritable variance remained after the effects of age and social contact were removed from both mean levels and co-twin resemblance. Reported frequency of passouts yielded significant, but equivalent, correlations in both MZ and DZ twins and no evidence of genetic influence.
PubMed ID
3307505 View in PubMed
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Genetic predisposition, environment and cancer incidence: a nationwide twin study in Finland, 1976-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199964
Source
Int J Cancer. 1999 Dec 10;83(6):743-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1999
Author
P K Verkasalo
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
E. Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. p.verkasalo@icrf.icnet.uk
Source
Int J Cancer. 1999 Dec 10;83(6):743-9
Date
Dec-10-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Environment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Registries
Sex Factors
Smoking
Abstract
Twin studies integrate genetic and environmental (including physical environment and life-style) information by comparing monozygotic and dizygotic twins for the occurrence of disease. Our objectives were to compare cancer incidence in twins with national rates and to estimate both the probability that co-twins of affected twins may develop cancer and the importance of genetic predisposition and environment in cancer development. The nationwide record linkage of the Finnish Twin Cohort Study, the Finnish Cancer Registry and the Central Population Register allowed the follow-up of 12,941 same-sexed twin pairs for incident primary cancers from 1976 to 1995. Zygosity was determined by use of a validated questionnaire in 1975. Methods included calculation of standardized incidence ratios and concordances and fitting of structural equation models. A total of 1,613 malignant neoplasms occurred in the cohort. The overall cancer incidence among twins resembled that among the general population. Monozygotic co-twins of affected twins were at 50% higher risk than were dizygotic co-twins. Based on genetic modeling, inherited genetic factors accounted for 18% (95% confidence interval 4-32%) of the liability in inter-individual variation in the risk of overall cancer, while non-genetic factors shared by twins accounted for 7% (0-16%) and unique environmental factors for 75% (65-85%). Our results appear to exclude a contribution greater than one-third for genetic predisposition in the development of cancer in the general population, thus pointing to the earlier confirmed substantial role of environment.
PubMed ID
10597189 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.