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11 records – page 1 of 2.

[Storm over western Sweden in September 1969: follow-up of treated storm victims by the storm who had been taken care of].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109639
Source
Lakartidningen. 1970 Feb 18;67(8):853-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-1970
Author
P. Heimann
J. Jönsson
Source
Lakartidningen. 1970 Feb 18;67(8):853-4
Date
Feb-18-1970
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Sweden
Weather
PubMed ID
5456818 View in PubMed
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Effects of impregnation of softwood with sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide on chemical and physical characteristics, enzymatic digestibility, and fermentability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292097
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2018 Jan; 247:200-208
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Zhao Wang
Guochao Wu
Leif J Jönsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2018 Jan; 247:200-208
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cellulose
Hydrolysis
Norway
Steam
Sulfur Dioxide
Sulfuric Acids
Abstract
Hydrothermal pretreatment improves bioconversion of lignocellulose, but the effects of different acid catalysts are poorly understood. The effects of sulfuric acid (SA) and sulfur dioxide (SD) in continuous steam pretreatment of wood of Norway spruce were compared in the temperature range 195°C-215°C. The inhibitory effects of the pretreatment liquid on cellulolytic enzymes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast were higher for SD- than for SA-pretreated material, and the inhibitory effects increased with increasing pretreatment temperature. However, the susceptibility to cellulolytic enzymes of wood pretreated with SD was 2.0-2.9 times higher than that of wood pretreated with SA at the same temperature. Data conclusively show that the superior convertibility of SD-pretreated material was not due to inhibition phenomena but rather to the greater capability of the SD pretreatment to reduce the particle size through partial delignification and cellulose degradation. Particle size was shown to be correlated with enzymatic digestibility (R2 0.97-0.98).
PubMed ID
28950127 View in PubMed
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Source
J Genet Couns. 2013 Dec;22(6):907-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Vigdis Stefansdottir
Reynir Arngrimsson
Jon J Jonsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Landspitali, The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland, vigdisst@landspitali.is.
Source
J Genet Couns. 2013 Dec;22(6):907-10
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Genetic Counseling
Humans
Iceland
Abstract
This brief report aims to give an overview of the history and current status of clinical genetics services in Iceland and specific genetic counseling considerations for Iceland's population. Presently, there are two part time medical geneticists and one full time genetic counselor with an MSc education from Cardiff, within the Department of Genetic and Molecular Medicine, based in Iceland's only tertiary healthcare facility, Landspitali, the National University Hospital. An oncologist (20 %) also contributes to the cancer genetic counseling service. In addition, a pediatric medical geneticist has a 25 % appointment at the Children's Hospital. No other health care organization offers genetic counseling, and there are no private genetic counseling services.
PubMed ID
23949570 View in PubMed
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Risk of tuberculosis in a large sample of patients with coeliac disease--a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137769
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2011 Mar;33(6):689-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
J F Ludvigsson
D S Sanders
M. Maeurer
J. Jonsson
J. Grunewald
J. Wahlström
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2011 Mar;33(6):689-96
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biopsy
Celiac Disease - complications - epidemiology - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Duodenum - pathology
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Jejunum - pathology
Middle Aged
Opportunistic Infections - complications - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - complications - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Research suggests a positive association between coeliac disease and tuberculosis (TB), but that research has often been limited to in-patients and small sample size. We examined the relationship between TB and coeliac disease.
To examine the association of TB and coeliac disease.
We collected biopsy data from all pathology departments in Sweden (n=28) to identify individuals who were diagnosed with coeliac disease between 1969 and 2007 (Marsh 3: villous atrophy; n=29,026 unique individuals). Population-based sex- and age-matched controls were selected from the Total Population Register. Using Cox regression, we calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for TB from data in the Swedish national health registers.
Individuals with coeliac disease were at increased risk of TB (HR=2.0; 95% CI=1.3-3.0) (during follow-up, 31 individuals with coeliac disease and 74 reference individuals had a diagnosis of TB). The absolute risk of TB in patients with coeliac disease was 10/100,000 person-years with an excess risk of 5/100,000. Risk estimates were the highest in the first year. Restricting our outcome to a diagnosis of TB confirmed by (I) a record of TB medication (HR=2.9; 95% CI=1.0-8.3), (II) data in the National Surveillance System for Infectious Diseases in Sweden (HR=2.6; 95% CI=1.3-5.2) or (III) positive TB cultivation (HR=3.3; 95% CI=1.6-6.8) increased risk estimates. The positive association between coeliac disease and TB was also observed before the coeliac disease diagnosis (odds ratio=1.6; 95% CI=1.2-2.1).
We found a moderately increased risk of tuberculosis in patients with coeliac disease.
Notes
Comment In: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2011 May;33(10):1175-6; author reply 1176-721488918
PubMed ID
21251029 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of iron deficiency and iron overload in the adult Icelandic population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227622
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1991;44(12):1289-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
J J Jonsson
G M Johannesson
N. Sigfusson
B. Magnusson
B. Thjodleifsson
S. Magnusson
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis 55455.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1991;44(12):1289-97
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anemia, Hypochromic - blood - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Erythrocyte Indices
Female
Ferritins - blood
Hemochromatosis - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Hemoglobins - analysis
Histocompatibility testing
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Iron - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of iron deficiency and overload in the adult population in Iceland, a developed Scandinavian country. The study population consisted of 4240 individuals aged 25-74 years randomly selected from the national roster. Basic hematological, S-iron, S-total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and S-ferritin measurements were obtained on 2588 individuals (61.0%). The results indicated unusually large iron stores in the adult Icelandic population and significantly larger iron stores in the rural compared to the urban population. Iron deficiency was rare except in urban premenopausal women, where 1 in 4 showed evidence of iron deficiency and 3.2% had iron deficiency anemia. Seven patients with hereditary hemochromatosis were identified from a subgroup of 1887 subjects, resulting in a prevalence of 0.37%. Two of the hereditary hemochromatosis patients had been gastrectomized. Measures to improve the iron balance in urban premenopausal women cannot therefore include increased iron fortification of food but must be more directed towards the target group.
PubMed ID
1753260 View in PubMed
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Trends and differences in tuberculosis incidences and clustering among natives in Denmark, Sweden and Finland: comparison of native incidences and molecular epidemiology among three low-incidence countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296222
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2018 Jul; 24(7):717-723
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
M K Pedersen
T Lillebaek
A B Andersen
H Soini
M Haanperä
R Groenheit
J Jonsson
E Svensson
Author Affiliation
International Reference Laboratory of Mycobacteriology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: makp@ssi.dk.
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2018 Jul; 24(7):717-723
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Cluster analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Male
Molecular Epidemiology
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
To compare the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) in Denmark, Sweden and Finland, by focusing on the native population in order to identify epidemiologic differences and thus indirectly possible differences in TB control.
TB incidence trends from 1990 through 2015 were compared among the countries. In addition, for the periods 2012-2013 and 2014-2015, genotyping data were compared. Genotyping was performed using the 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) method in Denmark and Sweden. For Finland, spoligotyping in conjunction with the 15-locus MIRU-VNTR method was used for 2012-2013 and translated into the 24-locus MIRU-VNTR when feasible, and for 2014-2015 only MIRU-VNTR was used. Both incidence trends and molecular epidemiology were assessed for native cases.
The average annual rate of change in TB incidence for native Danes was -2.4% vs. -6.1% and -6.9% for native Swedes and Finns respectively. In 2012-2013 Denmark had 52 native cases in the largest transmission chain vs. three cases in Sweden and ten in Finland, and during the same period the clustering rate for native Danes was 48.8% vs. 6.5% and 18.2% for native Swedes and Finns respectively. For 2014-2015, a similar pattern was seen.
The decline of TB among natives in Denmark is slower than for Sweden and Finland, and it seems Denmark has more active transmission among natives. The focused assessment on basic native TB epidemiology reveals striking differences in TB transmission among otherwise similar low-TB-incidence countries.
PubMed ID
29031789 View in PubMed
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Late detection of a shigellosis outbreak in a school in Madrid.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171983
Source
Euro Surveill. 2005 Oct;10(10):268-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
J. Jonsson
M del Carmen Alvarez-Castillo
J C Sanz
R. Ramiro
E. Ballester
M. Fernánez
M A Echeita
F. Martínez Navarro
Author Affiliation
Programa de Epidemiología Aplicada de Campo, Centro Nacional de Epidemiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2005 Oct;10(10):268-70
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Dysentery, Bacillary - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Questionnaires
Schools
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
Even though shigellosis in Spain is rare, an indigenous outbreak is occasionally detected. We describe an outbreak in a school in Madrid caused by person-to-person transmission of Shigella sonnei. After the detection of Shigella sonnei in a stool sample from a 3 year old girl, an investigation at her school was initiated. Questionnaires were distributed to the parents of 520 pupils attending the school. A case was defined as a school case if it was the first case in a child's household, and as a household case if other members of the household had fallen ill first. We identified 88 cases (60 pupils and 28 of their family members). The attack rate (AR) was 12% in the school and 32% in the families. There was a significant association between higher AR and lower age. The outbreak lasted for two months. The length and the shape of the epidemic curve of the 60 cases in pupils suggests person-to-person transmission. Shigella sonnei isolated from 5 different cases were typed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and was found to be an identical strain. The prolonged duration of the outbreak was probably due to delayed detection, and stopped as soon as control measures were introduced.
PubMed ID
16282643 View in PubMed
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Tuberculosis in the Circumpolar Region, 2006-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292176
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2018 Jun 01; 22(6):641-648
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-01-2018
Author
A-C Bourgeois
T Zulz
M G Bruce
F Stenz
A Koch
A Parkinson
T Hennessy
M Cooper
C Newberry
E Randell
J-F Proulx
B E Hanley
H Soini
T M Arnesen
A Mariandyshev
J Jonsson
B Søborg
J Wolfe
G Balancev
R Bruun de Neergaard
C P Archibald
Author Affiliation
Centre for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2018 Jun 01; 22(6):641-648
Date
Jun-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The northern circumpolar jurisdictions Canada (Northwest Territories, Nunavik, Nunavut, Yukon), Finland, Greenland, Norway, Russian Federation (Arkhangelsk), Sweden and the United States (Alaska).
To describe and compare demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics, including drug resistance and treatment completion, of tuberculosis (TB) cases in the northern circumpolar populations.
Descriptive analysis of all active TB cases reported from 2006 to 2012 for incidence rate (IR), age and sex distribution, sputum smear and diagnostic site characteristics, drug resistance and treatment completion rates.
The annual IR of TB disease ranged from a low of 4.3 per 100?000 population in Northern Sweden to a high of 199.5/100?000 in Nunavik, QC, Canada. For all jurisdictions, IR was higher for males than for females. Yukon had the highest proportion of new cases compared with retreatment cases (96.6%). Alaska reported the highest percentage of laboratory-confirmed cases (87.4%). Smear-positive pulmonary cases ranged from 25.8% to 65.2%. Multidrug-resistant cases ranged from 0% (Northern Canada) to 46.3% (Arkhangelsk). Treatment outcome data, available up to 2011, demonstrated >80% treatment completion for four of the 10 jurisdictions.
TB remains a serious public health issue in the circumpolar regions. Surveillance data contribute toward a better understanding and improved control of TB in the north.
PubMed ID
29862948 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.