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The 1988 and 2002 phocine distemper virus epidemics in European harbour seals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6586
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2006 Jan 30;68(2):115-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2006
Author
Tero Härkönen
Rune Dietz
Peter Reijnders
Jonas Teilmann
Karin Harding
Ailsa Hall
Sophie Brasseur
Ursula Siebert
Simon J Goodman
Paul D Jepson
Thomas Dau Rasmussen
Paul Thompson
Author Affiliation
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007, 10405 Stockholm, Sweden. tero.harkonen@swipnet.se
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2006 Jan 30;68(2):115-30
Date
Jan-30-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Carnivora
Comparative Study
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Disease Reservoirs - veterinary
Disease Vectors
Distemper - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Distemper Virus, Phocine
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Male
Morbillivirus - classification - pathogenicity
Phoca - virology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
We present new and revised data for the phocine distemper virus (PDV) epidemics that resulted in the deaths of more than 23 000 harbour seals Phoca vitulina in 1988 and 30,000 in 2002. On both occasions the epidemics started at the Danish island of Anholt in central Kattegat, and subsequently spread to adjacent colonies in a stepwise fashion. However, this pattern was not maintained throughout the epidemics and new centres of infection appeared far from infected populations on some occasions: in 1988 early positive cases were observed in the Irish Sea, and in 2002 the epidemic appeared in the Dutch Wadden Sea, 6 wk after the initiation of the outbreak at Anholt Island. Since the harbour seal is a rather sedentary species, such 'jumps' in the spread among colonies suggest that another vector species could have been involved. We discussed the role of sympatric species as disease vectors, and suggested that grey seal populations could act as reservoirs for PDV if infection rates in sympatric species are lower than in harbour seals. Alternatively, grey seals could act as subclinical infected carriers of the virus between Arctic and North Sea seal populations. Mixed colonies of grey and harbour seal colonies are found at all locations where the jumps occurred. It seems likely that grey seals, which show long-distance movements, contributed to the spread among regions. The harbour seal populations along the Norwegian coast and in the Baltic escaped both epidemics, which could be due either to genetic differences among harbour seal populations or to immunity. Catastrophic events such as repeated epidemics should be accounted for in future models and management strategies of wildlife populations.
PubMed ID
16532603 View in PubMed
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Baseline selenium status and effects of selenium and vitamin e supplementation on prostate cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104917
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Mar;106(3):djt456
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Alan R Kristal
Amy K Darke
J Steven Morris
Catherine M Tangen
Phyllis J Goodman
Ian M Thompson
Frank L Meyskens
Gary E Goodman
Lori M Minasian
Howard L Parnes
Scott M Lippman
Eric A Klein
Author Affiliation
Affiliations of authors: Cancer Prevention Program (ARK) and SWOG Statistical Center (AKD, CMT, PJG), Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; Department of Epidemiology (ARK, GEG) and Department of Environmental Health (GEG), University of Washington, Seattle, WA; University of Missouri, Research Reactor Center, Columbia, MO (JSM); Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital, Columbia, MO (JSM); Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (IMT); Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA (FLM); Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (LMM, HLP); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA (SML); Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (EAK).
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Mar;106(3):djt456
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nails - chemistry
Neoplasm Grading
Odds Ratio
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Puerto Rico - epidemiology
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk
Selenium - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Trace Elements - adverse effects
United States - epidemiology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Vitamins - adverse effects
Abstract
The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial found no effect of selenium supplementation on prostate cancer (PCa) risk but a 17% increased risk from vitamin E supplementation. This case-cohort study investigates effects of selenium and vitamin E supplementation conditional upon baseline selenium status.
There were 1739 total and 489 high-grade (Gleason 7-10) PCa cases and 3117 men in the randomly selected cohort. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for effects of supplementation within quintiles of baseline toenail selenium. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios, and all statistical tests are two-sided.
Toenail selenium, in the absence of supplementation, was not associated with PCa risk. Selenium supplementation (combined selenium only and selenium + vitamin E arms) had no effect among men with low selenium status (
Notes
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Mar;106(3):dju00524563520
Comment In: Nat Rev Urol. 2014 Apr;11(4):18424619375
PubMed ID
24563519 View in PubMed
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Burden of disease from Helicobacter pylori infection in western Canadian Arctic communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302489
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Jun 11; 19(1):730
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-11-2019
Author
Katharine Fagan-Garcia
Janis Geary
Hsiu-Ju Chang
Laura McAlpine
Emily Walker
Amy Colquhoun
Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten
Safwat Girgis
Billy Archie
Brendan Hanley
Andre Corriveau
John Morse
Rachel Munday
Karen J Goodman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. kfagan@ualberta.ca.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Jun 11; 19(1):730
Date
Jun-11-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Biopsy
Breath Tests
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Female
Gastric Mucosa - microbiology - pathology
Gastritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Gastroscopy - statistics & numerical data
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Metaplasia
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Indigenous communities across the circumpolar north have elevated H. pylori (Hp) prevalence and stomach cancer incidence. We aimed to describe the Hp-associated disease burden among western Canadian Arctic participants in community-driven projects that address concerns about health risks from Hp infection.
During 2008-2013, participants underwent Hp screening by urea breath test and gastroscopy with gastric biopsies. We estimated Hp prevalence and prevalence by Hp status of endoscopic and histopathologic diagnoses.
Among 878 participants with Hp status data, Hp prevalence was: 62% overall; 66% in 740 Indigenous participants; 22% in 77 non-Indigenous participants (61 participants did not disclose ethnicity); 45% at 0-14?years old, 69% at 15-34?years old, and 61% at 35-96?years old. Among 309 participants examined endoscopically, visible mucosal lesions were more frequent in the stomach than the duodenum: the gastric to duodenal ratio was 2 for inflammation, 8 for erosions, and 3 for ulcers. Pathological examination in 308 participants with gastric biopsies revealed normal gastric mucosa in 1 of 224 Hp-positive participants and 77% (65/84) of Hp-negative participants with sharp contrasts in the prevalence of abnormalities between Hp-positive and Hp-negative participants, respectively: moderate-severe active gastritis in 50 and 0%; moderate-severe chronic gastritis in 91 and 1%; atrophic gastritis in 43 and 0%; intestinal metaplasia in 17 and 5%.
The observed pattern of disease is consistent with increased risk of stomach cancer and reflects substantial inequity in the Hp-associated disease burden in western Arctic Canadian hamlets relative to most North American settings. This research adds to evidence that demonstrates the need for interventions aimed at reducing health risks from Hp infection in Indigenous Arctic communities.
PubMed ID
31185961 View in PubMed
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Challenges in conducting community-driven research created by differing ways of talking and thinking about science: a researcher's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107672
Source
Pages 864-870 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):864-870
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
RESEARCH IN THE NORTH Challenges in conducting community- driven research created by differing ways of talking and thinking about science: a researcher's perspective Amy Colquhoun*, Janis Geaty and Karen J. Goodman Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of
  1 document  
Author
Amy Colquhoun
Janis Geary
Karen J Goodman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Pages 864-870 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):864-870
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Communication
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation - methods - psychology
Health Literacy
Helicobacter Infections - prevention & control
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Indians, North American
Northwest Territories
Public Health - methods
Yukon Territory
Abstract
Increasingly, health scientists are becoming aware that research collaborations that include community partnerships can be an effective way to broaden the scope and enhance the impact of research aimed at improving public health. Such collaborations extend the reach of academic scientists by integrating a variety of perspectives and thus strengthening the applicability of the research. Communication challenges can arise, however, when attempting to address specific research questions in these collaborations. In particular, inconsistencies can exist between scientists and community members in the use and interpretation of words and other language features, particularly when conducting research with a biomedical component. Additional challenges arise from differing perceptions of the investigative process. There may be divergent perceptions about how research questions should and can be answered, and in expectations about requirements of research institutions and research timelines. From these differences, misunderstandings can occur about how the results will ultimately impact the community. These communication issues are particularly challenging when scientists and community members are from different ethnic and linguistic backgrounds that may widen the gap between ways of talking and thinking about science, further complicating the interactions and exchanges that are essential for effective joint research efforts. Community-driven research that aims to describe the burden of disease associated with Helicobacter pylori infection is currently underway in northern Aboriginal communities located in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada, with the goal of identifying effective public health strategies for reducing health risks from this infection. This research links community representatives, faculty from various disciplines at the University of Alberta, as well as territorial health care practitioners and officials. This highly collaborative work will be used to illustrate, from a researcher's perspective, some of the challenges of conducting public health research in teams comprising members with varying backgrounds. The consequences of these challenges will be outlined, and potential solutions will be offered.
Notes
Cites: Med Decis Making. 2001 Jan-Feb;21(1):37-4411206945
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2010 Mar;42(1):119-2720420096
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Sep;67(4):374-8319024806
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Aug;98(8):1398-40618556605
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):24-3918714896
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(12):2072-818952344
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Mar;22(3):289-9518354758
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Jan;98(1):22-718048800
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2006 May;61(2):173-9016122896
Cites: J Health Serv Res Policy. 2005 Oct;10(4):203-1116259686
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004;63 Suppl 2:139-4315736639
Cites: Health Educ Behav. 2005 Feb;32(1):84-10115642756
PubMed ID
23986884 View in PubMed
Documents
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Community-driven Research on Environmental Sources of H. pylori Infection in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258492
Source
Gut Microbes. 2014 Sep 1;:0
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2014
Author
Emily V Hastings
Yutaka Yasui
Patrick Hanington
Karen J Goodman
The CANHelp Working Group
Author Affiliation
a School of Public Health , University of Alberta , Edmonton , Canada.
Source
Gut Microbes. 2014 Sep 1;:0
Date
Sep-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Abstract The role of environmental reservoirs in H. pylori transmission remains uncertain due to technical difficulties in detecting living organisms in sources outside the stomach. Residents of some Canadian Arctic communities worry that contamination of the natural environment is responsible for the high prevalence of H. pylori infection in the region. This analysis aims to estimate associations between exposure to potential environmental sources of biological contamination and prevalence of H. pylori infection in Arctic Canada. Using data from 3 community-driven H. pylori projects in the Northwest and Yukon Territories, we estimated effects of environmental exposures on H. pylori prevalence, using odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) from multilevel logistic regression models to adjust for household and community effects. Investigated exposures include: untreated drinking water; livestock; dogs; cats; mice or mouse droppings in the home; cleaning fish or game. Our analysis did not identify environmental exposures associated clearly with increased H. pylori prevalence, except any exposure to mice or mouse droppings (OR = 4.6, CI = 1.2-18), reported by 11% of participants. Our multilevel models showed H. pylori clustering within households, but environmental exposures accounted for little of this clustering; instead, much of it was accounted for by household composition (especially: having infected household members; number of children). Like the scientific literature on this topic, our results do not clearly implicate or rule out environmental reservoirs of H. pylori; thus, the topic remains a priority for future research. Meanwhile, H. pylori prevention research should seek strategies for reducing direct transmission from person to person.
PubMed ID
25483330 View in PubMed
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Community-driven research on Helicobacter pylori infection in the Canadian Arctic: the Old Crow H. pylori Project

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284356
Source
Pages 725-726 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):725-726
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
INFECTIOUS DISEASE CQ\CTION Community-driven research on Helicobacter pylori infection in the Canadian Arctic: the Old Crow H. pylori Project Laura Aplin 1*, Janis Geary2 , Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten 1, Brendan Hanley3 , Diane Kirchgatter3 , Karen J. Goodman 1 •2 , The Old Crow H. pylori
  1 document  
Author
Laura Aplin
Janis Geary
Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten
Brendan Hanley
Diane Kirchgatter
Karen J. Goodman
The Old Crow H. pylori Project Planning Committee and The CANHelp Working Group
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Health and Social Services, Government of Yukon, Whitehorse, Canada
Source
Pages 725-726 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):725-726
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Abstract
The Old Crow H pylori Project aims to investigate the disease burden related to H. pylori infection and identify strategies for reducing health-related risks. This project was designed and conducted in collaboration with a local planning committee and includes 6 main components: surveys of health and socio-environmental factors, urea breath test (UBT) screening for H pylori infection, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, treatment, knowledge exchange and policy development.
Documents
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Complete Genome Sequences of Two Helicobacter pylori Strains from a Canadian Arctic Aboriginal Community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262059
Source
Genome Announc. 2015;3(2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Dangeruta Kersulyte
M Teresita Bertoli
Sravya Tamma
Monika Keelan
Rachel Munday
Janis Geary
Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten
Karen J Goodman
Douglas E Berg
Source
Genome Announc. 2015;3(2)
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We report here the complete genome sequences of two Amerind Helicobacter pylori strains from Aklavik, Northwest Territories, Canada. One strain contains extra iron-cofactored urease genes and ~140 rearrangements in its chromosome relative to other described strains (typically differing from one another by
PubMed ID
25883278 View in PubMed
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Designing the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176567
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Jan 19;97(2):94-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-19-2005
Author
Scott M Lippman
Phyllis J Goodman
Eric A Klein
Howard L Parnes
Ian M Thompson
Alan R Kristal
Regina M Santella
Jeffrey L Probstfield
Carol M Moinpour
Demetrius Albanes
Philip R Taylor
Lori M Minasian
Ashraful Hoque
Sarah Moody Thomas
John J Crowley
J Michael Gaziano
Janet L Stanford
Elise D Cook
Neil E Fleshner
Michael M Lieber
Philip J Walther
Fadlo R Khuri
Daniel D Karp
Gary G Schwartz
Leslie G Ford
Charles A Coltman
Author Affiliation
The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030-4009, USA. slippman@mdanderson.org
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Jan 19;97(2):94-102
Date
Jan-19-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans
Aged
Anticarcinogenic Agents - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Canada
Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Patient Selection
Prostatic Neoplasms - prevention & control
Puerto Rico
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Research Design
Selenium - therapeutic use
United States
Vitamin E - therapeutic use
Abstract
Prostate cancer continues to be a major health threat, especially among African American men. The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), which opened on July 25, 2001, was planned to study possible agents for the prevention of prostate cancer in a population of 32,400 men in the United States, including Puerto Rico, and Canada. SELECT is a phase III randomized, placebo-controlled trial of selenium (200 microg/day from L-selenomethionine) and/or vitamin E (400 IU/day of all rac alpha-tocopheryl acetate) supplementation for a minimum of 7 years (maximum of 12 years) in non-African American men at least 55 years of age and African American men at least 50 years of age. SELECT is a large, simple trial that conforms as closely as possible with community standards of care. This commentary discusses the design problems the SELECT investigators had to resolve in developing the trial, including the role of prostate cancer screening, the best forms and doses of the study agents, and estimation of the event (prostate cancer) rate of men on the placebo arm.
PubMed ID
15657339 View in PubMed
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The diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in Arctic regions with a high prevalence of infection: Expert Commentary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263943
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Jun 22;:1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-2015
Author
B J McMAHON
M G Bruce
A. Koch
K J Goodman
V. Tsukanov
G. Mulvad
M L Borresen
F. Sacco
D. Barrett
S. Westby
A J Parkinson
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Jun 22;:1-9
Date
Jun-22-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of peptic ulcer and is also associated with chronic gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Guidelines have been developed in the United States and Europe (areas with low prevalence) for the diagnosis and management of this infection, including the recommendation to 'test and treat' those with dyspepsia. A group of international experts performed a targeted literature review and formulated an expert opinion for evidenced-based benefits and harms for screening and treatment of H. pylori in high-prevalence countries. They concluded that in Arctic countries where H. pylori prevalence exceeds 60%, treatment of persons with H. pylori infection should be limited only to instances where there is strong evidence of direct benefit in reduction of morbidity and mortality, associated peptic ulcer disease and MALT lymphoma and that the test-and-treat strategy may not be beneficial for those with dyspepsia.
PubMed ID
26094936 View in PubMed
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Environment and waiting behaviors in emergency waiting areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237536
Source
Child Health Care. 1985;13(4):174-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
D. Alcock
J. Goodman
W. Feldman
P J McGrath
M. Park
M. Cappelli
Source
Child Health Care. 1985;13(4):174-80
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Child, Preschool
Data Collection
Emergency Service, Hospital
Family
Female
Health Facility Environment
Humans
Male
Ontario
Sociometric Techniques
Time Factors
Abstract
Environmental conditions and waiting behaviors of 625 children and their families were recorded in the waiting room and suture hall of a children's hospital and a general hospital. Randomized intervention and control days at the children's hospital resulted in children and their families being assigned to an experimental group receiving child life intervention or to a control group who did not receive child life intervention. A second control group at the general hospital did not receive child life intervention. The average waiting time was 1.5 hr. Significant differences were observed in noise level between the children's hospital and general hospital waiting areas, waiting behaviors of children who received child life intervention and those who did not, and parent-child interaction among the three groups. Suggestions for further study regarding the optimal use of waiting time are included.
PubMed ID
10300050 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.