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51 records – page 1 of 6.

14 years of follow-up from the Edinburgh randomised trial of breast-cancer screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20979
Source
Lancet. 1999 Jun 5;353(9168):1903-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1999
Author
F E Alexander
T J Anderson
H K Brown
A P Forrest
W. Hepburn
A E Kirkpatrick
B B Muir
R J Prescott
A. Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK. freda.alexander@ed.ac.uk
Source
Lancet. 1999 Jun 5;353(9168):1903-8
Date
Jun-5-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control - radiography
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Research
Humans
Logistic Models
Mammography - utilization
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scotland - epidemiology
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Edinburgh randomised trial of breast-cancer screening recruited women aged 45-64 years from 1978 to 1981 (cohort 1), and those aged 45-49 years during 1982-85 (cohorts 2 and 3). Results based on 14 years of follow-up and 270,000 woman-years of observation are reported. METHODS: Breast-cancer mortality rates in the intervention group (28,628 women offered screening) were compared with those in the control group (26,026) with adjustment for socioeconomic status (SES) of general medical practices. Rate ratios were derived by means of logistic regression for the total trial population and for women first offered screening while younger than 50 years. Analyses were by intention to treat. FINDINGS: Initial unadjusted results showed a difference of just 13% in breast-cancer mortality rates between the intervention and control groups (156 deaths [5.18 per 10,000] vs 167 [6.04 per 10,000]; rate ratio 0.87 [95% CI 0.70-1.06]), but the results were influenced by differences in SES by trial group. After adjustment for SES, the rate ratio was 0.79 (95% CI 0.60-1.02). When deaths after diagnosis more than 3 years after the end of the study were censored the rate ratio became 0.71 (0.53-0.95). There was no evidence of heterogeneity by age at entry and no evidence that younger entrants had smaller or delayed benefit (rate ratio 0.70 [0.41-1.20]). No breast-cancer mortality benefit was observed for women whose breast cancers were diagnosed when they were younger than 50 years. Other-cause mortality rates did not differ by trial group when adjusted for SES. INTERPRETATION: Our findings confirm results from randomised trials in Sweden and the USA that screening for breast cancer lowers breast-cancer mortality. Similar results are reported by the UK geographical comparison, UK Trial of Early Detection of Breast Cancer. The results for younger women suggest benefit from introduction of screening before 50 years of age.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 Jun 5;353(9168):1896-710371561
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 Sep 11;354(9182):946-710489974
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 Sep 11;354(9182):946; author reply 94710489973
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 Sep 11;354(9182):947-810489975
Comment In: Lancet. 2001 Dec 22-29;358(9299):2165; author reply 2167-811784654
PubMed ID
10371567 View in PubMed
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Acute effect of estrogen on metabolic coronary vasodilator responses to atrial pacing in postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205030
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1998 Jul 15;82(2):236-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1998
Author
T J Anderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1998 Jul 15;82(2):236-9
Date
Jul-15-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Coronary Disease - complications - physiopathology
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Estrogens, Conjugated (USP) - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Vasodilation - drug effects
Women's health
Abstract
This study assessed the acute effect of intravenous conjugated equine estrogen on metabolic coronary vasodilation to atrial pacing in 22 postmenopausal women with coronary disease or risk factors for atherosclerosis. Impaired metabolic coronary vasodilation is present in postmenopausal women with atherosclerosis or its risk factors and is not acutely augmented by the intravenous administration of Premarin.
PubMed ID
9678297 View in PubMed
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Affordability of a nutritious diet for income assistance recipients in Nova Scotia (2002-2010).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121472
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 May-Jun;103(3):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricia L Williams
Cynthia G Watt
Michelle Amero
Barbara J Anderson
Ilya Blum
Rebecca Green-LaPierre
Christine P Johnson
Debra E Reimer
Author Affiliation
Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS. patty.williams@msvu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 May-Jun;103(3):183-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet - economics
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Poverty - economics
Social Welfare - economics
Abstract
This study assessed the affordability of a basic nutritious diet for selected household types relying on income assistance (IA) by comparing potential incomes to the costs of the National Nutritious Food Basket (NNFB) and other essential expenditures in Nova Scotia from 2002 to 2010, and examined the adequacy of IA allowances during this time period.
The cost of the NNFB was surveyed across a random sample of grocery stores in NS during five time periods: 2002, 2004/05, 2007, 2008 and 2010, and was factored into affordability scenarios for three household types relying on IA: a family of four, a lone mother with three children, and a lone male. Essential monthly expenses were deducted from total net income to determine if adequate funds remained for the NNFB.
For each time period examined, the findings demonstrated that all household types faced a significant monthly deficit if they purchased a basic nutritious diet. In each household scenario, the potential monthly deficits increased from 2002 to 2010, ranging from $112 in 2002 for a lone mother with three children to $523 in 2010 for a lone male.
Despite increases in allowances, these findings suggest that the risk of food insecurity has increased for IA-dependent households in NS. To address this public health challenge, public health practitioners must advocate for integrated, progressive and sustainable social welfare policies that ensure that individuals and families relying on IA have adequate income and other supports to meet their basic needs, including access to a healthy diet.
PubMed ID
22905636 View in PubMed
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An erythema infectiosum-like illness caused by human parvovirus infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238559
Source
N Engl J Med. 1985 Jul 11;313(2):74-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-11-1985
Author
F A Plummer
G W Hammond
K. Forward
L. Sekla
L M Thompson
S E Jones
I M Kidd
M J Anderson
Source
N Engl J Med. 1985 Jul 11;313(2):74-9
Date
Jul-11-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
DNA, Viral - analysis
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Erythema - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Male
Manitoba
Parvoviridae - analysis
Parvoviridae Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Abstract
In the spring of 1980, an epidemic of an illness that resembled erythema infectiosum occurred in Manitoba, Canada. We initiated prospective epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic studies of this illness among elementary-school children and their families. Initial microbiologic studies failed to identify the cause of the exanthem. After a similar illness associated with serologic evidence of human parvovirus infection occurred in London, stored specimens of 12 patients with exanthem were investigated for parvovirus infection. Eleven patients had parvovirus-specific IgM antibody, as did two family contacts and a teacher with nonexanthematous illnesses, and two asymptomatic family members. None of 28 children with measles or rubella had serologic evidence of recent parvovirus infection. Human parvovirus was detected by DNA hybridization and immune electron microscopy in the serum of one patient who later had a rash and in one unaffected family contact. Parvovirus DNA was also detected in the pharyngeal specimen of the teacher who was ill but did not have a rash. We conclude that human parvovirus infection can be asymptomatic or cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including nonexanthematous illness and an illness resembling erythema infectiosum.
PubMed ID
2987695 View in PubMed
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Autosomal recessive, fatal infantile hypertonic muscular dystrophy among Canadian Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217615
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1994 Aug;21(3):203-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
A G Lacson
S S Seshia
H B Sarnat
J. Anderson
W R DeGroot
A. Chudley
C. Adams
H Z Darwish
R B Lowry
S. Kuhn
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Manitoba.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1994 Aug;21(3):203-12
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Electromyography
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Fatal Outcome
Female
Genes, Recessive
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Muscle Proteins - analysis - metabolism
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism - pathology
Muscular Dystrophies - ethnology - genetics - mortality
Nerve Tissue Proteins - metabolism
Pedigree
Abstract
We describe eleven mid-western Canadian aboriginal infants with a unique, progressive muscle disorder. All except one had muscle biopsy and/or autopsy. The infants were normal newborns who rapidly developed rigidity of all skeletal muscles, with early, respiratory insufficiency. Death occurred before 18 months of age. Electromyography showed increased insertion activity and profuse fibrillation potentials; motor unit potentials and interference pattern are normal until late in the course. Pathologic features include progressive, granular to powdery Z-band transformation, myofibrillar loss, and muscle regeneration. SDS-gel electrophoresis of one muscle sample revealed increased 54kDa and reduced 80kDa protein fractions. This disease differs from other conditions with Z-band alterations because of continuous muscle activity and relentless clinical progression. The clinical features, elevated serum creatine kinase, electromyographic and muscle biopsy findings suggest a dystrophic process. The recognition of this condition as an autosomal recessive disorder allows appropriate genetic counselling.
PubMed ID
8000975 View in PubMed
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Bronchiolitis-associated hospitalizations among American Indian and Alaska Native children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6083
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2000 Jan;19(1):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
S A Lowther
D K Shay
R C Holman
M J Clarke
S F Kaufman
L J Anderson
Author Affiliation
Respiratory and Enteric Viruses Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. SGL6@cdc.gov
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2000 Jan;19(1):11-7
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Bronchiolitis - ethnology - virology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - diagnosis - ethnology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract illness among infants and young children. Respiratory system diseases account for a large proportion of hospitalizations in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children; however, aggregate estimates of RSV-associated hospitalizations among AI/AN children have not been made. METHODS: We used Indian Health Service hospitalization data from 1990 through 1995 to describe hospitalizations associated with bronchiolitis, the most characteristic clinical manifestation of RSV infection, among AI/AN children
Notes
Comment In: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2000 May;19(5):49210819360
PubMed ID
10643844 View in PubMed
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Can households earning minimum wage in Nova Scotia afford a nutritious diet?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165814
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Nov-Dec;97(6):430-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricia L Williams
Christine P Johnson
Meredith L V Kratzmann
C Shanthi Jacob Johnson
Barbara J Anderson
Cathy Chenhall
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS. patty.williams@msvu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Nov-Dec;97(6):430-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Costs and Cost Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Diet - economics
Family Characteristics
Female
Financing, Personal - statistics & numerical data
Focus Groups
Food - economics
Food Industry - economics
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Humans
Male
Nova Scotia
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Requirements
Poverty - classification
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - classification
Abstract
To assess the affordability of a nutritious diet for households earning minimum wage in Nova Scotia.
Food costing data were collected in 43 randomly selected grocery stores throughout NS in 2002 using the National Nutritious Food Basket (NNFB). To estimate the affordability of a nutritious diet for households earning minimum wage, average monthly costs for essential expenses were subtracted from overall income to see if enough money remained for the cost of the NNFB. This was calculated for three types of household: 1) two parents and two children; 2) lone parent and two children; and 3) single male. Calculations were also made for the proposed 2006 minimum wage increase with expenses adjusted using the Consumer Price Index (CPI).
The monthly cost of the NNFB priced in 2002 for the three types of household was 572.90 dollars, 351.68 dollars, and 198.73 dollars, respectively. Put into the context of basic living, these data showed that Nova Scotians relying on minimum wage could not afford to purchase a nutritious diet and meet their basic needs, placing their health at risk. These basic expenses do not include other routine costs, such as personal hygiene products, household and laundry cleaners, and prescriptions and costs associated with physical activity, education or savings for unexpected expenses.
People working at minimum wage in Nova Scotia have not had adequate income to meet basic needs, including a nutritious diet. The 2006 increase in minimum wage to 7.15 dollars/hr is inadequate to ensure that Nova Scotians working at minimum wage are able to meet these basic needs. Wage increases and supplements, along with supports for expenses such as childcare and transportation, are indicated to address this public health problem.
PubMed ID
17203719 View in PubMed
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Characterization of human metapneumoviruses isolated from patients in North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190113
Source
J Infect Dis. 2002 Jun 1;185(11):1660-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2002
Author
Teresa C T Peret
Guy Boivin
Yan Li
Michel Couillard
Charles Humphrey
Albert D M E Osterhaus
Dean D Erdman
Larry J Anderson
Author Affiliation
Respiratory Virus Section, Respiratory and Enteric Viruses Branch, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2002 Jun 1;185(11):1660-3
Date
Jun-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Metapneumovirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - ultrastructure
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Paramyxoviridae Infections - virology
Phylogeny
Quebec
Respiratory Tract Infections - virology
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Viral Fusion Proteins - genetics
Abstract
Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was recently identified in The Netherlands and was linked to acute respiratory tract illness. In this study, 11 isolates from 10 patients with respiratory disease from Quebec, Canada, were tested by a reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction based on the fusion protein gene. Identified sequences were consistent with HMPV. The patients were 2 months to 87 years of age (median age, 58 years) and presented with acute respiratory tract illness during the winter season. Sequence studies of the nucleocapsid, fusion, and polymerase genes identified 2 main lineages of HMPV and cocirculation of both lineages during the same year. These findings support a previous finding that HMPV is a human respiratory pathogen that merits further study.
PubMed ID
12023774 View in PubMed
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Characterization of Neisseria meningitidis isolates and clinical features of meningococcal conjunctivitis in ten patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35810
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1994 May;13(5):388-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
J. Anderson
I. Lind
Author Affiliation
Neisseria Department, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen S, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1994 May;13(5):388-93
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Conjunctivitis, Bacterial - epidemiology - microbiology - physiopathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - physiopathology
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - isolation & purification
Retrospective Studies
Serotyping
Abstract
Cases of meningococcal conjunctivitis occurring in Denmark in the period 1982-1991 were reviewed. In a survey of laboratory reports, ten cases were identified. The meningococcal strains were characterized by serological grouping, typing and subtyping, and by antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Five cases were caused by serogroup B meningococci (B:15:P1.16, B:15:P1.6, B:4:P1.15) and five cases by serogroup C meningococci (C:2a:P1.2 (4 strains), C:14:NST). The median age of the patients was 12.5 months (range 7 days to 9 years). Signs of conjunctivitis were predominant; in addition, five of the patients had fever and general malaise. In one patient the same strain was recovered from blood and eye secretions. None of the patients had signs of meningitis. All meningococcal strains isolated from patients with meningococcal conjunctivitis were assumed to be virulent and had the same characteristics as strains causing meningococcal disease in Denmark within the same period.
PubMed ID
8070451 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.