Skip header and navigation

Refine By

20 records – page 1 of 2.

Abdominal and gynoid adipose distribution and incident myocardial infarction in women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143340
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Dec;34(12):1752-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
P. Wiklund
F. Toss
J-H Jansson
M. Eliasson
G. Hallmans
A. Nordström
P W Franks
P. Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Dec;34(12):1752-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology - radionuclide imaging
Blood Glucose - physiology
Body Composition
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Hypertriglyceridemia - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Obesity - complications
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
The relationships between objectively measured abdominal and gynoid adipose mass with the prospective risk of myocardial infarction (MI) has been scarcely investigated. We aimed to investigate the associations between fat distribution and the risk of MI.
Total and regional fat mass was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in 2336 women and 922 men, of whom 104 subsequently experienced an MI during a mean follow-up time of 7.8 years.
In women, the strongest independent predictor of MI was the ratio of abdominal to gynoid adipose mass (hazard ratio (HR)=2.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.79-3.32 per s.d. increase in adipose mass), after adjustment for age and smoking. This ratio also showed a strong association with hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and hypertriglyceridemia (P
PubMed ID
20498655 View in PubMed
Less detail

The disparity between long-term survival in patients with and without diabetes following a first myocardial infarction did not change between 1989 and 2006: an analysis of 6,776 patients in the Northern Sweden MONICA Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101419
Source
Diabetologia. 2011 Jul 21;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-21-2011
Author
M. Eliasson
J-H Jansson
D. Lundblad
U. Näslund
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden, mats.eliasson@nll.se.
Source
Diabetologia. 2011 Jul 21;
Date
Jul-21-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Long-term survival after myocardial infarction (MI) has improved in the population, but data on diabetic patients is lacking. We analysed survival for up to 18 years after a first MI in patients with or without diabetes. METHODS: The Northern Sweden MONICA Myocardial Infarction Registry was linked to the Cause-of-Death Registry for a total of 6,776 patients, 25-64 years of age, with a first MI during 1989-2006. Prehospital deaths were included. Follow-up ended on 30 August 2008. RESULTS: Sixteen per cent had diabetes. Median follow-up time was 6.8 years, and the study included 50,667 patient-years. One third of the non-diabetic patients died vs half of the diabetic patients. Median survival for non-diabetic men was 227 months and for diabetic men 123 months. Corresponding figures for the non-diabetic and diabetic women were 222 and 81 months respectively. Men with diabetes had an age-adjusted HR for all-cause mortality of 1.56 (95% CI 1.39, 1.79) vs men without diabetes. Mortality risk was higher among diabetic women, HR 1.97 (1.62, 2.39) (diabetes × sex interaction, p?=?0.03). Survival increased for three consecutive cohorts and was higher in non-diabetic patients for all durations of follow-up and in all three cohorts. The interaction of diabetes x cohort was not significant over time (p?=?0.5) and HRs did not differ either. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Long-term survival after a first MI is markedly lower in diabetic patients, especially among women, over an 18-year observation time. Although survival has improved in diabetic patients, the effect of diabetes upon mortality has not diminished.
PubMed ID
21779872 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effect of streptokinase neutralizing antibodies on fibrinolytic activity and reperfusion following streptokinase treatment in acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187013
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Nov;252(5):405-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
J B Nilsson
T K Nilsson
J H Jansson
K. Boman
S. Söderberg
U. Näslund
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. johan.nilsson@medicin.umu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Nov;252(5):405-11
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antibodies - blood
Female
Fibrinolysis - physiology
Fibrinolytic Agents - immunology - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - blood - drug therapy - immunology
Streptokinase - immunology - therapeutic use
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - immunology
Vectorcardiography - methods
Abstract
To evaluate tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) activity as a measure of fibrinolytic response to treatment with streptokinase (SK) and to relate this to the effect of pretreatment SK antibodies and to successful reperfusion assessed by continuous computerized vectorcardiography (VCG).
Umeå University Hospital.
A total of 104 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) treated with SK and no history of previous SK treatment were studied. The tPA activity was measured 4 h after the start of treatment. The effect of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies to SK was analysed with a functional assay in pretreatment samples. Reperfusion was evaluated with VCG.
Successful reperfusion.
Fifty-five patients (53%) were classified as successfully reperfused. The risk for failed reperfusion was calculated in logistic regression models. In a univariate model, a borderline significant increase in the risk of failed reperfusion was observed in intermediate levels of SK neutralizing antibodies, but not in the highest levels. In a multivariate model, only high tPA activity, >25 U mL(-1), at 4 h (OR 0.17: 95% CI: 0.06-0.51) was associated with a higher rate of reperfusion whilst longer time to treatment (OR 1.17; 95% CI: 1.02-1.35) was associated with a higher risk of failed reperfusion. There was no significant correlation between neutralizing antibodies to SK and tPA activity at 4 h.
The SK treatment of AMI induced high levels of tPA activity which were associated with successful reperfusion. The effect of pre-existing SK antibodies had no significant influence on reperfusion and were not correlated to the fibrinolytic activity obtained.
PubMed ID
12528758 View in PubMed
Less detail

Elevated plasma homocysteine: cause or consequence of myocardial infarction?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53248
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Dec;256(6):491-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
J. Hultdin
A M Thøgersen
J-H Jansson
T K Nilsson
L. Weinehall
G. Hallmans
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical Chemistry, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Dec;256(6):491-8
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Creatinine - blood
Female
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Serum Albumin - analysis
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a first myocardial infarction leads to increased plasma homocysteine concentrations and whether the association between homocysteine and myocardial infarction was greater at follow-up compared with baseline. DESIGN: A population-based, prospective, nested case-referent study. SETTING: Screening took place at the nearest health survey centre in northern Sweden. SUBJECTS: Of more than 36,000 persons screened, 78 developed a first myocardial infarction (average 18 months after sampling). Fifty of these had participated in a follow-up health survey (average 8(1/2) years between surveys) and were sex- and age-matched with 56 referents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of plasma homocysteine levels in case and referent subjects before and after development of a first myocardial infarction. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found between cases and referents regarding homocysteine at baseline or follow-up. Plasma homocysteine and plasma creatinine increased significantly, and plasma albumin decreased significantly over time. Conditional univariate logistic regression indicated that high homocysteine at follow-up but not baseline was associated with first myocardial infarction (OR 2.49; 95% CI: 1.03-6.02), but the relation disappeared in multivariate analyses including plasma creatinine and plasma albumin. High plasma creatinine remained associated with first myocardial infarction at both baseline (OR 2.94; 95% CI: 1.05-8.21) and follow-up (OR 3.38; 95% CI: 1.21-9.48). CONCLUSION: In this study, first myocardial infarction did not cause increased plasma homocysteine concentration.
PubMed ID
15554950 View in PubMed
Less detail

High plasminogen activator inhibitor and tissue plasminogen activator levels in plasma precede a first acute myocardial infarction in both men and women: evidence for the fibrinolytic system as an independent primary risk factor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48046
Source
Circulation. 1998 Nov 24;98(21):2241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-24-1998
Author
A M Thögersen
J H Jansson
K. Boman
T K Nilsson
L. Weinehall
F. Huhtasaari
G. Hallmans
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Clinical Chemistry, and Nutritional Research and Pathology. Umeå University Hospital, University of Umeå, Sweden. anna.margrethe.thogersen@medicin.umu.se
Source
Circulation. 1998 Nov 24;98(21):2241-7
Date
Nov-24-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Biological Markers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate - blood
Female
Fibrinolysis
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Plasminogen Inactivators - blood
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In patients with established ischemic heart disease, prospective cohort studies have indicated that plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), the inhibitor of the fibrinolytic system, may predict cardiovascular events. So far, there have been no primary prospective studies of PAI-1. METHODS AND RESULTS: The aim of the present study was to test whether plasma levels of PAI-1, tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), von Willebrand factor (vWF), and thrombomodulin (TM) could predict the occurrence of a first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a population with high prevalence of coronary heart disease by use of a prospective nested case-control design. Mass concentrations of PAI-1 and tPA were significantly higher for the 78 subjects who developed a first AMI compared with the 156 references matched for age, sex, and sampling time; for tPA, this increase was independent of smoking habits, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, cholesterol, and apolipoprotein A-I. The ratio of quartile 4 to 1 for tPA was 5.9 for a patient to develop a first AMI. The association between tPA and AMI was seen in both men and women. Increased levels of vWF were associated with AMI in a univariate analysis. High levels of TM were associated with AMI in women but not in men. CONCLUSIONS: The plasma levels of PAI-1, tPA, and vWF are associated with subsequent development of a first AMI; for PAI-1 and tPA, this relation was found in both men and women. For tPA but not for PAI-1 and vWF, this association is independent of established risk factors.
PubMed ID
9826309 View in PubMed
Less detail

High proinsulin concentration precedes acute myocardial infarction in a nondiabetic population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54195
Source
Metabolism. 1999 Sep;48(9):1197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
B. Lindahl
B. Dinesen
M. Eliasson
M. Røder
J H Jansson
F. Huhtasaari
G. Hallmans
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Metabolism. 1999 Sep;48(9):1197-202
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol - blood
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Proinsulin - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Hyperinsulinemia has been shown to have strong and consistent associations with a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors. Yet the associations between hyperinsulinemia and coronary heart disease (CHD) have been weak, at best, and often inconsistent. Most previous studies have analyzed the insulin level using a radioimmunoassay method, which does not separate proinsulin from intact (true) insulin. New methods separating the two have demonstrated that proinsulin may be at least as strongly or even more strongly associated than intact insulin with a CHD-promoting risk factor profile. In this incident case-control study of a nondiabetic population, 67 cases of first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were compared with 127 individually age- and sex-matched controls. Blood sampling was collected prior to disease outcome. Proinsulin and intact insulin levels were measured using highly sensitive two-site sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The highest quartile of proinsulin, in contrast to intact insulin, showed a greater than threefold increase in AMI compared with the lowest quartile, with an odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 3.5 and 1.2 to 9.9, respectively. The increased risk of AMI persisted after controlling for total cholesterol, smoking status, diastolic blood pressure, and antihypertensive medication, and disappeared after additional control was used for the body mass index. High levels of proinsulin, even in a nondiabetic population, seem to be a strong and independent risk factor for AMI. The mechanism underlying the relationship may be direct via effects on fibrinolysis or, probably more plausibly, indirect, where proinsulin is a marker of an underlying metabolic disturbance.
PubMed ID
10484064 View in PubMed
Less detail

Homozygosity for the C677-->T mutation of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and total plasma homocyst(e) ine are not associated with greater than normal risk of a first myocardial infarction in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53947
Source
Coron Artery Dis. 2001 Mar;12(2):85-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
A M Thögersen
T K Nilsson
G. Dahlen
J H Jansson
K. Boman
F. Huhtasaari
G. Hallmans
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden. amt@dadlnet.dk
Source
Coron Artery Dis. 2001 Mar;12(2):85-90
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Female
Homocysteine - blood
Homozygote
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2)
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - genetics
Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-NH Group Donors - genetics
Point Mutation
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Results of several case-control studies have shown elevated total plasma homocyst(e)ine (TPH) and homozygosity for the point mutation C677-->T in the gene for 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) to be associated with a greater than normal risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease. However, there have been few epidemiologic studies and the interpretation of the results is not clear-cut. OBJECTIVE: To elucidate whether homozygosity for the point mutation C677-->T in the gene for MTHFR, and TPH are risk factors for a first myocardial infarction. DESIGN: A prospective nested case-control study in Northern Sweden. METHODS: Among more than 36000 persons screened, 78 cases satisfied the inclusion criterion of having developed, after sampling, a first myocardial infarction. For each case, two controls matched for sex and age were randomly selected. RESULTS: We found no statistically significant difference among the prevalences of the three possible MTHFR genotypes -/- (no mutation), +/+ (both alleles have the mutation), and +/- among cases and controls in univariate conditional logistic regression analysis. Mean levels of TPH in patients and controls were 12.2+/-4.9 and 12.2+/-3.5 micromol/l (means +/- SD), respectively (NS). CONCLUSIONS: In this study neither homozygosity for the point mutation C677-->T in the gene for MTHFR nor TPH was related to a greater than normal risk of a first myocardial infarction for members of the population of northern Sweden. Further research is needed in order to show whether TPH is an independent risk factor for a first myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
11281306 View in PubMed
Less detail

Increased levels of plasma thrombomodulin are associated with vascular and all-cause mortality in patients on long-term anticoagulant treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210946
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1503-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
J H Jansson
K. Boman
M. Brännström
T K Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Skellefteå Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1503-5
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - drug therapy - mortality
Cause of Death
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Long-Term Care
Prothrombin Time
Regression Analysis
Risk
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Thromboembolism - blood - drug therapy - mortality
Thrombomodulin - blood
Abstract
The aim of the study was to test if plasma levels of thrombomodulin could predict mortality in 209 patients on long-term anticoagulant treatment followed up for 3.8 years.
The thrombomodulin level was 60.9 +/- 29.8 micrograms.l-1 for all 45 patients who died and 60.5 +/- 30.5 micrograms.l-1 for the 38 vascular deaths, compared to 52.3 +/- 20.7 micrograms.l-1 for the 164 survivors. We found that, in Cox regression analyses, all-cause (P = 0.025) and vascular mortality (P = 0.042) was significantly and independently associated with increased levels of thrombomodulin.
The level of plasma thrombomodulin can predict all-cause and vascular mortality in patients on long-term anticoagulant treatment.
PubMed ID
8909906 View in PubMed
Less detail

Increased levels of tissue plasminogen activator antigen in essential hypertension. A population-based study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208799
Source
J Hypertens. 1997 Apr;15(4):349-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
M. Eliasson
J H Jansson
P. Nilsson
K. Asplund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Luleå Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Hypertens. 1997 Apr;15(4):349-56
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Fibrinogen - analysis
Humans
Hypertension - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 - blood
Population Surveillance
Sweden
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - blood
Abstract
To investigate components of the haemostatic and fibrinolytic system in borderline hypertensives and hypertensives, drug-treated or not, from a defined population.
A randomly selected sample of the population of northern Sweden, 1558 subjects aged 25-64 years, was studied. Eight per cent of them were being treated with antihypertensive drugs (trHT). Remaining subjects were classified according to their mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Normotension, DBP or = 95 mmHg, in 8% of the subjects.
Mean age increased from the normotensive group through the bHT and uHT groups to the trHT group, members of which were the oldest. Age-adjusted values for the body mass index, waist: hip ratio, serum triglyceride and Phadeseph plasma insulin levels increased with each level of hypertension. Plasma fibrinogen levels and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 activity (in men) increased stepwise from normotensives through bHT and uHT to the highest values found in the trHT group. The tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) activity in men declined strongly across the groups, trHT having the lowest fibrinolytic activity (P
PubMed ID
9211169 View in PubMed
Less detail

Large improvements in major cardiovascular risk factors in the population of northern Sweden: the MONICA study 1986-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99859
Source
J Intern Med. 2011 Feb;269(2):219-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
M. Eriksson
L. Holmgren
U. Janlert
J-H Jansson
D. Lundblad
B. Stegmayr
S. Söderberg
M. Eliasson
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå Research Department, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå Department of Medicine, Skellefteå Hospital, Skellefteå Department of Medicine, Sunderby Hospital, Luleå National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2011 Feb;269(2):219-31
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Abstract. Eriksson M, Holmgren L, Janlert U, Jansson J-H, Lundblad D, Stegmayr B, S?derberg S, Eliasson M (Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Ume? University, Ume?; Research Department, Norrbotten County Council, Lule?; Department of Medicine, Skellefte? Hospital, Skellefte?; Department of Medicine, Sunderby Hospital, Lule?; and National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden). Large improvements in major cardiovascular risk factors in the population of northern Sweden: the MONICA study 1986-2009. J Intern Med 2011; 269: 219-231. Objectives. The incidence of cardiovascular disease has declined rapidly in Sweden since the 1980s. We explored changes in major cardiovascular risk factors in northern Sweden between 1986 and 2009. Design. Since 1986, six population surveys have been carried out in northern Sweden using procedures of the World Health Organization MONICA project. The population age range was 25-64 years in 1986 and 1990, and 25-74 years from 1994. Trends were analysed using generalized linear models. Results. A total of 10 586 subjects were included in the surveys. Blood pressure decreased by 4.9/3.9 mmHg in women and 1.8/1.5 mmHg in men aged 25-64 years between 1986 and 2009. In men and women aged 65-74 years, the decrease was 12.6/6.1 mmHg between 1994 and 2009. From 1994, the use of blood pressure-lowering drugs increased, particularly among the older subgroup. The prevalence of smoking halved between 1986 and 2009; 11% of women and 9% of men were smokers in 2009. Cholesterol levels decreased by 0.9 mmol L(-1) in the younger age group (25-64 years), and the use of lipid-lowering agents increased from 1994. Among subjects aged 25-64 years, one in five was obese in 2009, which was twice as many as in 1986, and body mass index (BMI) increased by 1.5 kg m(-2) , corresponding to an increase in weight of 4 kg. There was no further increase in BMI from 2004. The prevalence of diabetes did not change between 1986 and 2009. The proportion that received a university education increased markedly in all age groups, especially in women, during the study period. Conclusions. Significant improvements were observed in major cardiovascular risk factors in northern Sweden between 1986 and 2009.
PubMed ID
21158982 View in PubMed
Less detail

20 records – page 1 of 2.