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Description of extended pre-harvest pig Salmonella surveillance-and-control programme and its estimated effect on food safety related to pork.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99993
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Nov;57 Suppl 1:6-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
L. Alban
K. Barfod
J V Petersen
J. Dahl
J C Ajufo
G. Sandø
H H Krog
S. Aabo
Author Affiliation
The Danish Agricultural & Food Council, Copenhagen, Denmark. lia@lf.dk
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Nov;57 Suppl 1:6-15
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Denmark - epidemiology
Food Contamination
Food Handling
Food Safety
Humans
Incidence
Meat
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Salmonella - isolation & purification
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Salmonella Infections - prevention & control
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Zoonoses
Abstract
Salmonella in pork can be combated during pre- or post-harvest. For large slaughterhouses, post-harvest measures like decontamination might be cost-effective while this is less likely with small-to-medium sized slaughterhouses. In this study, pre-harvest measures might be more relevant. We describe an extended surveillance-and-control programme for Salmonella in finisher pigs, which, to establish equivalence to the Swedish control programme, is intended for implementation on the Danish island, Bornholm. The effect of the programme on food safety was estimated by analysing Salmonella data from pig carcasses originating from herds that would have qualified for the programme during 2006-2008. Food safety was interpreted as prevalence of Salmonella on carcasses as well as the estimated number of human cases of salmonellosis related to pork produced within the programme. Data from the Danish Salmonella programme were obtained from Bornholm. We used a simulation model developed to estimate the number of human cases based on the prevalence of Salmonella on carcass swabs. Herds are only accepted in the programme if they have one or less seropositive sample within the previous 6 months. In this way, the Salmonella load is kept to a minimum. The programme is not yet in operation and pigs that qualify for the programme are currently mixed at slaughter with those that do not qualify. Therefore, we had to assess the impact on the carcass prevalence indirectly. The prevalence of Salmonella in carcass swabs among qualifying herds was 0.46% for the 3 years as a whole, with 2006 as the year with highest prevalence. According to the simulation the expected number of human cases relating to pork produced within the programme was below 10. When the programme is in operation, an extra effect of separating pigs within the programme from those outside is expected to lower the prevalence of Salmonella even further.
PubMed ID
21083813 View in PubMed
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Estimated costs of postoperative wound infections. A case-control study of marginal hospital and social security costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217190
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1994 Oct;113(2):283-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
K B Poulsen
A. Bremmelgaard
A I Sørensen
D. Raahave
J V Petersen
Author Affiliation
National Center for Hospital Hygiene, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1994 Oct;113(2):283-95
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospital Costs
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Social Security - economics
Surgical Wound Infection - economics - epidemiology
Abstract
A cohort of 4515 surgical patients in ten selected intervention groups was followed. Three hundred and seventeen developed postoperative wound infections, and 291 of these cases were matched 1:1 to controls by operation, sex and age. In comparison to the controls the cases stayed longer in hospital after the intervention and had more contact after discharge with the social security system. Using data from a national sentinel reference database of the incidence of postoperative wound infections, and using national activity data, we established an empirical cost model based on the estimated marginal costs of hospital resources and social sick pay. It showed that the hospital resources spent on the ten groups, which represent half of the postoperative wound infections in Denmark, amounted to approximately 0.5% of the annual national hospital budget. This stratified model creates a better basis for selecting groups of operations which need priority in terms of preventive measures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
7925666 View in PubMed
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Survey of numbers and types of lesions detectable in pig heads and the implications for human and animal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75568
Source
Vet Rec. 1999 Aug 28;145(9):256-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-1999
Author
F. Sørensen
J V Petersen
Author Affiliation
Veterinary and Meat Hygiene Advisory Section, The Federation of Danish Pig Producers and Slaughterhouses, Copenhagen.
Source
Vet Rec. 1999 Aug 28;145(9):256-8
Date
Aug-28-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Consumer Product Safety
Denmark - epidemiology
Food Inspection - methods
Head
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Meat-Packing Industry
Salmonella Food Poisoning - prevention & control
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology
PubMed ID
10504070 View in PubMed
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Survival of patients with surgical wound infection: a case-control study of common surgical interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215918
Source
Br J Surg. 1995 Feb;82(2):208-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
K B Poulsen
C H Wachmann
A. Bremmelgaard
A I Sørensen
D. Raahave
J V Petersen
Author Affiliation
National Center for Hospital Hygiene.
Source
Br J Surg. 1995 Feb;82(2):208-9
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - mortality
Survival Rate
Abstract
A cohort of 4515 surgical patients was selected from ten different surgical intervention groups, and 291 of 317 with a postoperative wound infection were matched 1:1 with controls with regard to intervention, sex and age. The mortality rate was investigated from the time of operation, with a follow-up period from 4 years 4 months to 8 years 4 months. Eighty-seven patients with a deep infection had a significantly increased mortality rate, with a risk ratio of 1.7. Without a distinction between superficial and deep infection the former might mask the higher mortality rate associated with the latter.
PubMed ID
7749691 View in PubMed
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