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155 records – page 1 of 16.

A 2-year self-help smoking cessation manual intervention among middle-aged Finnish men: an application of the transtheoretical model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217852
Source
Prev Med. 1994 Jul;23(4):507-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
U E Pallonen
L. Leskinen
J O Prochaska
C J Willey
R. Kääriäinen
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Prevention Research Center, University of Rhode Island, Kingston 02881.
Source
Prev Med. 1994 Jul;23(4):507-14
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manuals as Topic
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Self Care
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
A 2-year self-help manual smoking cessation intervention was conducted among a panel of middle-aged Finnish men (n = 265) who were recruited proactively in a longitudinal cardiovascular risk factor surveillance study.
Intervention utilized the stages of change concept of the transtheoretical model. The stages were assessed in the treatment condition at baseline of the cessation study and after that by mail every sixth month. Assessments were followed by an immediate mailing of a stage-based self-help manual matching the stage of change at that time. A usual care group was assessed annually but received no treatment.
A significant time x intervention effect (P
PubMed ID
7971879 View in PubMed
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[10 years of the ischemic heart disease prevention project in northern Karelia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239026
Source
Cas Lek Cesk. 1985 Mar 29;124(13):385-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-1985

10-year trends in physical activity in the eastern Finnish adult population: relationship to socioeconomic and lifestyle characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233930
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;224(3):195-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
B. Marti
J T Salonen
J. Tuomilehto
P. Puska
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;224(3):195-203
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In a large, community-based cardiovascular disease prevention study in Eastern Finland, independent random population samples were surveyed in 1972, 1977 and 1982. The leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), occupational physical activity (OPA), and socioeconomic and lifestyle characteristics were assessed. In men and women aged 30-59, the proportion with high LTPA increased from 1972 to 1982 by approximately one half (p less than 0.001), whereas that of high OPA decreased during the same period (p less than 0.001). In both sexes, high overall physical activity fell from 1972 to 1977 (p less than 0.001), but no more from 1977 to 1982. The proportion of entirely sedentary remained stable. Education, income and younger age showed a positive, body mass index, smoking and OPA a graded, negative association with high LTPA in 1972 and 1982. Significant (p less than 0.001) differences in 10-year trends of changes in LTPA were observed: men and women with low education or income increased LTPA more than those with high education and income. Socioeconomic factors, such as income and education, appear to have lost importance as determinants of population-wide exercise, whereas the clustering of low physical activity with overweight and smoking has increased.
PubMed ID
3239447 View in PubMed
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Abdominal obesity is associated with increased risk of acute coronary events in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190450
Source
Eur Heart J. 2002 May;23(9):706-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
H-M Lakka
T A Lakka
J. Tuomilehto
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General practice, Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 2002 May;23(9):706-13
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - blood supply - pathology
Acute Disease
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body constitution
Body mass index
Coronary Disease - blood - complications - epidemiology
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - complications
Oxygen - blood
Risk factors
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to investigate the associations of abdominal obesity and overall obesity with the risk of acute coronary events.
Body mass index indicating overall obesity and waist-to-hip ratio and waist circumference indicating abdominal obesity were measured for 1346 Finnish men aged 42-60 years who had neither cardiovascular disease nor cancer at baseline. There were 123 acute coronary events during an average follow-up of 10.6 years. In Cox regression analyses adjusted for confounding factors, waist-to-hip ratio (P=0.009), waist circumference (P=0.010) and body mass index (P=0.013) as continuous variables were associated directly with the risk of coronary events. These associations were in part explained by blood pressure, diabetes, fasting serum insulin, serum lipids, plasma fibrinogen, and serum uric acid. Waist-to-hip ratio of > or =0.91 was associated with a nearly threefold risk of coronary events. Waist-to-hip ratio provided additional information beyond body mass index in predicting coronary heart disease, whereas body mass index did not add to the predictive value of waist-to-hip ratio. Abdominal obesity combined with smoking and poor cardiorespiratory fitness increased the risk of coronary events 5.5 and 5.1 times, respectively.
Abdominal obesity is an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease in middle-aged men and even more important than overall obesity. Since the effect of abdominal obesity was strongest in smoking and unfit men, the strategy for lifestyle modification to prevent coronary heart disease should address these issues jointly.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 2002 May;23(9):687-911977990
PubMed ID
11977996 View in PubMed
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Aging or disease? Cardiovascular reactivity in Finnish men over the middle years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208340
Source
Psychol Aging. 1997 Jun;12(2):225-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
J R Jennings
T. Kamarck
S. Manuck
S A Everson
G. Kaplan
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA. injenn@vms.cis.pitt.edu
Source
Psychol Aging. 1997 Jun;12(2):225-38
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Finland
Hemodynamics - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychological Tests
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Cardiovascular responses to psychological events may mediate the influence of stress on cardiovascular disease. In this study the authors asked whether cardiovascular responses to psychological challenge changed with age and whether such changes were intrinsic to aging or could be attributed to the influence of disease and medications. Cardiovascular reactivity to mental challenge was examined in 902 men ranging in age from 46 to 64 years who participated in the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. A battery of 4 tasks was used to induce cardiovascular responses. Current disease status, age, and medication use were entered into hierarchical regression analyses to assess their relation with measures of cardiovascular reactivity. Age and hypertension contributed independent, approximately equal, but small amounts of variance in the cardiac and vascular reactivity indexes. Medications also influenced reactivity independently of age and disease. Performance on the tasks was more consistently altered by age than by disease or medication. Cardiac and vascular reactivity increased with increasing age and the presence of hypertension. The authors conclude that both age and disease state must be considered when examining cardiovascular reactivity as a risk factor for disease.
PubMed ID
9189982 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia and risk of death in middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210431
Source
J Psychosom Res. 1996 Dec;41(6):541-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
J. Kauhanen
G A Kaplan
R D Cohen
J. Julkunen
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Finland. jussi.kauhanen@uku fi
Source
J Psychosom Res. 1996 Dec;41(6):541-9
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk
Sampling Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Abstract
We prospectively examined the association between alexithymia and risk of death over an average follow-up time of nearly 5.5 years in 42- to 60-year-old men (N = 2297) participating in the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD). Alexithymia, impairment in identification, processing, and verbal expression of inner feelings, was assessed by the validated Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS) In age-adjusted survival analyses, men in the highest alexithymia quintile had a twofold greater risk of all-cause death (p
PubMed ID
9032717 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia may influence the diagnosis of coronary heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218241
Source
Psychosom Med. 1994 May-Jun;56(3):237-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Kauhanen
G A Kaplan
R D Cohen
R. Salonen
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
State of California Department of Health Services, Berkeley.
Source
Psychosom Med. 1994 May-Jun;56(3):237-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - psychology
Angina Pectoris - diagnosis - psychology
Carotid Stenosis - diagnosis - psychology
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise Test - psychology
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - psychology
Personality Assessment
Risk factors
Type A Personality
Abstract
A number of psychosomatic studies have suggested that alexithymia, impairment in identifying and expressing inner feelings, might somehow affect the course of various illnesses. However, none of these studies have distinguished between an impact of alexithymia on actual pathophysiological change versus an impact only on illness behavior. In the present study, a population-based random sample of 2297 middle-aged men from Eastern Finland was evaluated for alexithymia using the Finnish version of the self-report Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS). Although high TAS scores were associated with prior diagnosis of coronary heart disease (CHD), they were not associated with greater prevalence of ischemia on an exercise tolerance test. The results of B-mode ultrasonography of the carotid artery for those who had a CHD diagnosis showed that carotid atherosclerosis actually decreased significantly as alexithymia increased. An interaction analysis indicated that alexithymia was related to increased probability of being diagnosed with CHD only among those who had mildly or moderately progressed carotid atherosclerosis, and not among those with the most severe progression. Alexithymia was associated with higher perceived exertion, and to some extent, with more self-reported symptoms during the exercise tolerance test. The findings support the hypothesis that alexithymia relates to increased symptom reporting rather than pathophysiological changes in CHD. The results also suggest that alexithymic men may get diagnosed earlier, perhaps because of their different illness behavior.
PubMed ID
8084970 View in PubMed
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Analgesics and risk of coronary and other death in middle-aged men in eastern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241158
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1984;216(3):295-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
J T Salonen
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1984;216(3):295-9
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Analgesics - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Random Allocation
Risk
Abstract
The association between oral analgesics and the risk of death from ischaemic heart disease (IHD), cardiovascular disease, disease other than IHD, and any disease was studied in a cohort of 3551 men aged 30-59 years, based on a random sample from the population of eastern Finland. A number of potential coronary risk factors were allowed for in multiple logistic models. On the basis of these data, a regular use of oral analgesics is associated with a decreased risk of death from IHD. The relative risk was 0.6 with 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.2-0.9 for IHD death and 0.6 (95% CI = 0.4-0.9) for cardiovascular death. No significant association was found between oral analgesics and the risk of death from diseases other than IHD.
PubMed ID
6496187 View in PubMed
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Analysis of community-based cardiovascular disease prevention studies--evaluation issues in the North Karelia Project and the Minnesota Heart Health Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236934
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1986 Jun;15(2):176-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986
Author
J T Salonen
T E Kottke
D R Jacobs
P J Hannan
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1986 Jun;15(2):176-82
Date
Jun-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Finland
Humans
Minnesota
Models, Theoretical
Research Design
Risk
Sampling Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
Karelia project of the Minnesota Heart Health Program. International Journal of Epidemiology 1986, 15: 176-182. Community-based cardiovascular disease control studies represent an effort to change cardiovascular disease rates in entire communities. Communities, rather than individuals, are the primary units of analysis. The cross-community multiple time series model to estimate and test the effects is based on multiple communities that are evaluated at several points over time. Issues that influence the power of the analysis include: the number of communities to be studied, community size and composition, sample sizes of surveys, the decision to use cohorts or cross-sectional surveys, the number of surveys conducted in each community, and assumptions of latencies in the effects. These points are illustrated using the experiences of the North Karelia Project and the Minnesota Heart Health Program. The North Karelia Project was a community-based cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention programme consisting of a five-year intervention period in 1972-7. It took place in two provinces in Finland. The Minnesota Heart Health Program is similar, taking place between 1980 and 1990 in six communities in the American Midwest.
PubMed ID
3721679 View in PubMed
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Anger expression and incident hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203695
Source
Psychosom Med. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):730-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
S A Everson
D E Goldberg
G A Kaplan
J. Julkunen
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. severson@umich.edu
Source
Psychosom Med. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):730-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anger
Coronary Disease - psychology
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
It has long been thought that anger is important in the development of essential hypertension. However, tests of this hypothesis have yielded conflicting findings. This study prospectively examined the relationship between anger expression style and incident hypertension in a population sample of middle-aged men.
Participants were 537 initially normotensive men from eastern Finland, who completed a medical examination and series of psychological questionnaires at baseline and at 4-year follow-up. Anger expression was assessed by Spielberger's Anger-out and Anger-in scales.
At follow-up, 104 men (19.4%) were hypertensive (blood pressure > or = 165 mm Hg systolic and/or 95 mm Hg diastolic). Age-adjusted logistic regression analyses revealed that each 1-point increase in Anger-out was associated with a 12% increase in risk of hypertension after 4 years of follow-up (p
PubMed ID
9847033 View in PubMed
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155 records – page 1 of 16.