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20 years or more of follow-up of living kidney donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222923
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1992
Author
J S Najarian
B M Chavers
L E McHugh
A J Matas
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455.
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Date
Oct-3-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - urine
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Creatinine - blood - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Kidney - physiology
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Proteinuria - etiology
Pulmonary Embolism - mortality
Tissue Donors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The perioperative and long-term risks for living kidney donors are of concern. We have studied donors at the University of Minnesota 20 years or more (mean 23.7) after donation by comparing renal function, blood pressure, and proteinuria in donors with siblings. In 57 donors (mean age 61 [SE 1]), mean serum creatinine is 1.1 (0.01) mg/dl, blood urea nitrogen 17 (0.5) mg/dl, creatinine clearance 82 (2) ml/min, and blood pressure 134 (2)/80 (1) mm Hg. 32% of the donors are taking antihypertensive drugs and 23% have proteinuria. The 65 siblings (mean age 58 [1.3]) do not significantly differ from the donors in any of these variables: 1.1 (0.03) mg/dl, 17 (1.2) mg/dl, 89 (3.3) ml/min, and 130 (3)/80 (1.5) mm Hg, respectively. 44% of the siblings are taking antihypertensives and 22% have proteinuria. To assess perioperative mortality, we surveyed all members of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons about donor mortality at their institutions. We documented 17 perioperative deaths in the USA and Canada after living donation, and estimate mortality to be 0.03%. We conclude that perioperative mortality in the USA and Canada after living-donor nephrectomy is low. In long-term follow-up of our living donors, we found no evidence of progressive renal deterioration or other serious disorders.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1992 Nov 28;340(8831):1354-51360068
PubMed ID
1357243 View in PubMed
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Review of world's experience with pancreas and islet transplantation and results of intraperitoneal segmental pancreas transplantation from related and cadaver donors at Minnesota.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48949
Source
Transplant Proc. 1981 Mar;13(1 Pt 1):291-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1981