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[Alexander Pushkin's duel--biographic and medical aspects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198145
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Apr 10;120(10):1170-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2000
Author
J M Tangen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Apr 10;120(10):1170-2
Date
Apr-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Famous Persons
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Male
Pelvic Bones - injuries
Peritonitis - history
Poetry as Topic - history
Russia
Wounds, Gunshot - history
Abstract
The great Russian poet Aleksandr Pushkin (1799-1837) died 46 hours after being wounded by a pistol shot in a duel. The bullet penetrated the right pelvic bone, continued through the lower abdomen, and crushed the right part of the sacral bone. Biographical events leading to the duel are presented in the article, which also reviews articles in Russian medical journals describing the extent of the trauma and discussing the treatment possibilities at the time of the duel as well as present-day treatment. It is concluded that death was caused by peritonitis and that only modern extensive abdominal and orthopaedic surgery combined with antibiotic treatment could have saved the poet's life.
PubMed ID
10863347 View in PubMed
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[Chronic myeloid leukemia in health regions 1, 3, 4 and 5 during the period 1990-96]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20967
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 May 10;119(12):1733-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1999
Author
J. Lamvik
L. Brinch
I M Dahl
M. Sjo
I. Nesthus
J M Tangen
S. Berentsen
B. Ly
F V Shammas
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling, Regionsykehuset i Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 May 10;119(12):1733-6
Date
May-10-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
English Abstract
Female
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Abstract
The aim of the present investigation was to obtain information about treatment, clinical course and outcome for all patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia through a six-year period in a defined part of Norway. A total number of 141 patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria. This is equivalent to 0.9 patients per 100,000 per year. The median age was 62 years. More than 70% of the patients were primarily treated with hydroxyurea, either alone or combined with interferon. 40 out of 57 patients younger than 55 years underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Median survival for all patients was 36 months with an estimated five-year survival rate of 33%. Patients older than 55 years had a median survival of 30 months with 16% alive after five years. The five-year survival rate for patients younger than 55 years was 56%, for transplanted patients 72%. 60 of 84 patients older than 55 years have died after 4 1/2 years median observation time. Two thirds of those died of leukaemia; one third of other causes. 23 of 57 patients younger than 55 years have died. 11 of them had had transplantations and most of them died from transplantation-related causes, while leukaemia was the dominating cause of death in the others.
PubMed ID
10380587 View in PubMed
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Cost of autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: the Norwegian experience from a multicenter cost study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174911
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2005 Jun;35(12):1149-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
V. Mishra
S. Andresen
L. Brinch
S. Kvaløy
P. Ernst
M K Lønset
J M Tangen
J. Wikelund
C. Flatum
E. Baggerød
B. Helle
S. Vaaler
T P Hagen
Author Affiliation
Health Professional Support Department, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. vinod.mishra@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2005 Jun;35(12):1149-53
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cryopreservation - economics
Cytapheresis - economics
Financing, Government
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization - economics
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Norway
Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation - economics
Prospective Studies
Transplantation, Autologous
Abstract
High-dose therapy with autologous blood progenitor cell support is now routinely used for patients with certain malignant lymphomas and multiple myeloma. We performed a prospective cost analysis of the mobilization, harvesting and cryopreservation phases and the high-dose therapy with stem cell reinfusion and hospitalization phases. In total, 40 consecutive patients were studied at four different university hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data on direct costs were obtained on a daily basis. Data on indirect costs were allocated to the specific patient based on estimates of relevant department costs (ie the service department's costs), and by means of predefined allocation keys. All cost data were calculated at 2001 prices. The mean total costs for the two phases were US$ 32,160 (range US$ 19,092-50,550). The mean total length of hospital stay for two phases was 31 days (range 27-37). A large part of the actual cost in the harvest phase was attributed to stem cell mobilization, including growth factors, harvesting and cryopreservation. In the high-dose chemotherapy phase, the most significant part of the costs was nursing staff. Average total costs were considerably higher than actual DRG-based reimbursement from the government, indicating that the treatment of these patients was heavily subsidized by the basic hospital grants.
PubMed ID
15880133 View in PubMed
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[High dose therapy with autologous stem cell support--finally a progress in myelomatosis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19513
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Aug 30;121(20):2402-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-2001
Author
F. Wisløff
J M Tangen
L. Brinch
I M Dahl
F X Gruber
J. Hammerstrøm
A. Waage
I. Nesthus
P. Ernst
Author Affiliation
Hematologisk avdeling Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. f.g.b.wisloff@ioks.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Aug 30;121(20):2402-6
Date
Aug-30-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating - administration & dosage
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal - administration & dosage
Clinical Trials
Comparative Study
Cost-Benefit Analysis
English Abstract
Follow-Up Studies
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Melphalan - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Prednisone - administration & dosage
Prognosis
Transplantation, Autologous
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Since the introduction of the simple cyclic oral treatment with melphalan and prednisone in the late 1960s, there has been no substantial improvement in the therapy of multiple myeloma. In 1994, the Nordic Myeloma Study Group initiated a population-based, prospective study to evaluate the impact on survival of high dose chemotherapy in newly diagnosed, symptomatic patients under 60 years of age, compared to a conventionally treated control group. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 274 patients were treated according to a specified high dose protocol and compared to 274 patients from previous population-based trials fulfilling the same eligibility criteria. RESULTS: Median survival was 44 months in the control group and 62 months in the intensive treatment group (risk ratio 1.65; 95% CI = 1.28-2.14, P = 0.0001). A study of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) which was integrated in the trial showed a moderately reduced HRQoL associated with the intensive treatment phase, but no statistically significant difference beyond the first year of follow-up. In a cost-utility analysis of the trial, the cost per (quality-adjusted life years) was estimated at USD 26,000. INTERPRETATION: The incremental cost of the treatment is within what is usually thought to be acceptable limits. Further improvement of the results and reduction of stay in hospital would give an even more favourable cost-utility ratio.
PubMed ID
11603051 View in PubMed
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[High dose therapy with autologous stem cell support in malignant disorders. Excerpt from the statement by the advisory group of the State Health Services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22483
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Sep 10;116(21):2577-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-1996
Author
H. Holte
S O Kvaløy
T. Engan
S A Evensen
O. Mella
J M Tangen
F. Wesenberg
E A Wist
Author Affiliation
Onkologisk avdeling, Det Norske Radiumhospital, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Sep 10;116(21):2577-81
Date
Sep-10-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
English Abstract
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - economics
Humans
Neoplasms - radiotherapy - therapy
Norway
Radiotherapy Dosage
Transplantation, Autologous
Abstract
New biomedical knowledge may improve the diagnostic procedures and treatment provided by the Health Services, but at additional cost. In a social democratic health care system, the hospital budgets have no room for expensive, new procedures or treatments, unless these are funded through extra allocation from the central authorities. High dose therapy with autologous stem cell support in malignant disorders is an example of a new and promising, but rather expensive treatment, but its role in cancer therapy has yet to be established. The indications for testing high dose therapy with autologous stem cell support in various malignancies are discussed, with emphasis on the principles for deciding which categories of disease should have priority. The authors suggest some malignant disorders for which high dose therapy with stem cell support should be explored versus conventional treatment in randomised prospective trials.
PubMed ID
8928130 View in PubMed
Less detail

Survival in 86 patients, aged 15-60, with primary acute myelogenous leukemia, treated with a common program in the Norwegian health regions I, III, IV and V in the period 1990-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21982
Source
Eur J Haematol. 1997 Aug;59(2):110-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
J M Tangen
M. Abdelnoor
L. Brinch
I M Dahl
J. Lamvik
B. Ly
I. Nesthus
F. Wisløff
Author Affiliation
Department of Hematology, Medical clinic, Ullevål University Hospital,Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Haematol. 1997 Aug;59(2):110-4
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Survival Analysis
Transplantation, Autologous
Abstract
Eighty-six patients between 15 and 60 yr with primary acute myelogenous leukemia in health regions I, III, IV and V in Norway were treated according to a common protocol from 21 January 1990 until 1 September 1995 (until 1 January 1993 for health region IV). Seventy-one percent of the patients reached complete remission (CR) and went on to receive consolidation treatment. In addition to chemotherapy, 18 patients under the age of 52, i.e. 28% of all patients in this age group, received allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. A follow-up analysis was performed by 1 September 1996. The median overall survival was 15 months, estimated 3-yr survival 30% and estimated survival at 5 yr was 26%. The median duration of 1st CR was 19 months, and the leukemia-free survival at 3 yr was 29%. At follow-up 26/86 patients were alive, 18 in 1st CR (4 after BMT) and 8 in 2nd CR (5 after BMT in 2nd, 1 after BMT in early 1st relapse). These results are comparable to many previously published studies, but may be inferior to the results obtained with more intensive consolidation treatment, including high dose Ara C.
PubMed ID
9293859 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.