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Regional mortality patterns in Saskatchewan, 1956-1965.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255780
Source
Can J Public Health. 1972 Jan-Feb;63(1):4-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
J M Robertson
D J Hosking
Source
Can J Public Health. 1972 Jan-Feb;63(1):4-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Demography
Humans
Mortality
Residence Characteristics
Saskatchewan
PubMed ID
5010571 View in PubMed
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Familial and sporadic breast cancer cases in Iceland: a comparison related to ABO blood groups and risk of bilateral breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25761
Source
Int J Cancer. 1988 Oct 15;42(4):499-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1988
Author
L. Tryggvadottir
H. Tulinius
J M Robertson
Author Affiliation
Icelandic Cancer Registry, Reykjavik.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1988 Oct 15;42(4):499-501
Date
Oct-15-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - etiology - genetics
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Iceland
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
This study was aimed at determining whether the familial clustering often observed in breast cancer is associated with genetic factors. We compared familial and sporadic breast cancer cases with respect to ABO blood group distribution and the risk of bilateral disease, using the data from the Icelandic Cancer Registry which contains genealogical information for about 30% of the breast cancer cases diagnosed in Iceland since 1911. Cases were classified as familial if at least one first-degree relative had breast cancer. Using this criterion, we identified 184 familial cases and 572 sporadic cases. The familial cases had a 2-fold higher prevalence of blood group B than did the sporadic cases, and the frequency of this blood group in non-affected relatives of cases was significantly reduced. Familial cases were about 2.7 times more likely to suffer from bilateral breast cancer than were the sporadic patients. These results support the presence of a genetic factor in the etiology of familial breast cancer.
PubMed ID
3170024 View in PubMed
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Some calculations on the prevalence of dementia in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235523
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1987 Mar;32(2):81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1987
Author
E R Jeans
E. Helmes
H. Merskey
J M Robertson
K A Rand
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1987 Mar;32(2):81-6
Date
Mar-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Institutionalization
Psychometrics
Abstract
The epidemiology of dementia in Canada is not known. However, we report figures on the frequency of dementia in institutions in Ontario based upon the use of a multidimensional observation scale for the assessment of the elderly. These findings on institutionalized patients can be extrapolated to the whole elderly population, but the procedure is clearly too conservative by comparison with findings in other countries and in the light of the known occurrence of numbers of demented patients outside institutions. Ratios in different studies for the numbers of patients with dementia outside institutions and within institutions range from 1:1 to 6:1. Using a ratio of 2:1 and applying it to age specific population figures, a prevalence of dementia in Canada of 222,324 for those over 65 is obtained with a rate of 9.4% in that age group. When the figures projected in this way are compared with five epidemiological studies for the rate of dementia elsewhere, the Canadian figure which we have obtained ranks fourth out of six. This estimate provides potential figures on which to base the planning of services, provided that the inferential nature of the estimates is fully recognized.
PubMed ID
3494498 View in PubMed
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An analysis of blood lead data in clinical records by external data on lead pipes and age of household.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220772
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1993 Jul-Sep;3(3):299-314
Publication Type
Article
Author
R J Alder
J A Dillon
S. Loomer
H C Poon
J M Robertson
Author Affiliation
Middlesex-London Health Unit, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1993 Jul-Sep;3(3):299-314
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Construction Materials - analysis
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lead - analysis - blood
Male
Ontario
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
This study examined the possibility that lead pipes in the drinking water distribution system were elevating the blood lead levels of children in London, Ontario, Canada. Based on their postal codes, 164 children admitted between 1984 and 1989 to an institution for the behaviorally disordered or developmentally challenged were categorized according to whether they lived in the area of the city known by the local Public Utilities Commission to be serviced by lead pipes. Analysis of covariance was used to obtain confounder-adjusted geometric means in each area. After adjusting for gender, year of lead test (a surrogate for gasoline source), and census tract prevalence of low family income, children in the lead service area (LSA) were found not to have higher blood lead levels (geometric means: LSA = 4.7 micrograms/dl, Non-LSA = 4.8 micrograms/dL; p = 0.839). The average blood lead level declined 60.9% between 1984 and 1989. Using municipal tax assessment data on the age of each child's home, those children living in homes built during or before 1945 (when interior paints were as much as 50% lead by dry weight) had an average blood lead level that was 62.3% higher (p = 0.011) than that of those in homes built since 1975 (when interior paints were limited to no higher than 0.5% lead by dry weight). A clear gradient was observed. This association with age of home remained significant after adjusting for gender, diagnosis, and year of lead test. Variables indicating the amount of industry near the child's residence and the presence of lead service pipes did not enter the model after house-age. In conclusion, no evidence indicated that the lead service pipes were elevating blood lead levels in these London children. The data suggest that with the removal of lead from gasoline, lead-based paint is a significant remaining source of lead exposure. Little data are available on childhood lead exposure from paint in Canada. The present descriptive data suggest that more research into this potential problem in Canada is warranted.
PubMed ID
8260839 View in PubMed
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