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50 records – page 1 of 5.

Alcohol, smoking, social and occupational factors in the aetiology of cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239865
Source
Int J Cancer. 1984 Nov 15;34(5):603-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1984
Author
J M Elwood
J C Pearson
D H Skippen
S M Jackson
Source
Int J Cancer. 1984 Nov 15;34(5):603-12
Date
Nov-15-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
British Columbia
Dental Care
Female
Humans
Laryngeal Neoplasms - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Neoplasms - etiology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Pharyngeal Neoplasms - etiology
Risk
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
A case-control study of 374 patients with primary epithelial cancers of the oral cavity, oro- and hypopharynx, and larynx is reported, the controls being patients with selected other cancers, matched for age and sex. Of all eligible patients, 93% were interviewed. Increased risks were seen with alcohol consumption and, less strongly, with smoking, which for all sites could be adequately fitted by either a multiplicative or an additive model. However, the site-specific relationships were different, alcohol consumption being significantly associated only with oral cavity, pharyngeal and extrinsic laryngeal tumours, and smoking only with intrinsic laryngeal tumours. Increased risks were associated with low socio-economic status, the unmarried state, and poor dental care. No significant associations were seen with specific occupational exposures.
PubMed ID
6500740 View in PubMed
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Anencephalus and drinking water composition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249965
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1977 May;105(5):460-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1977
Author
J M Elwood
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1977 May;105(5):460-8
Date
May-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anencephaly - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Calcium - analysis
Canada
Congenital Abnormalities - mortality
Drinking
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Fresh Water - analysis
Humans
Hydrocephalus - mortality
Lithium - analysis
Magnesium - analysis
Pregnancy
Spinal Dysraphism - mortality
Water - analysis
Water Softening
Water supply
Abstract
The mortality rate (stillbirths and infant deaths) from anencephalus from 1950-1969 in 36 cities of over 50,000 population in Canada showed a negative association (r = -.39) with the concentration of magnesium in water sampled at domestic taps. The mortality rates showed negative associations with mean income and longitude, and a multiple regression model using the three factors showed significant effects of each and accounted for 69% of the intercity variation in rates. There were no significant associations seen with water calcium concentration or total hardness. Income, magnesium and longitude were also negatively associated with mortality rates from spina bifida, hydrocephalus, other congenital abnormalities, and total stillbirth and infant death rates, but the association with magnesium was significant only for total stillbirths. The negative association of anencephalus mortality and magnesium levels was also seen in a sample of 14 smaller towns in Ontario.
PubMed ID
324271 View in PubMed
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Body site distribution of cutaneous malignant melanoma in relationship to patterns of sun exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204355
Source
Int J Cancer. 1998 Oct 29;78(3):276-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-29-1998
Author
J M Elwood
R P Gallagher
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1998 Oct 29;78(3):276-80
Date
Oct-29-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carcinoma in Situ - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - pathology
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Organ Specificity
Registries
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Abstract
A study of all newly incident melanoma patients in British Columbia in 1991-1992 was undertaken to test the hypothesis raised by an earlier study, which showed that in younger patients the incidence rate of melanoma per unit area of skin was higher on intermittently exposed skin areas than on continuously exposed areas. Using 1,033 patients and a more detailed body site categorisation than was previously possible, our results confirmed that in both men and women under age 50 the highest melanoma density was on the back. At ages over 50, the greatest density occurred on fully exposed sites, such as the face, though the dorsum of the hand and forearm, likely also to have high exposure, show very low melanoma densities. Differences between males and females correlate well with differences in likely exposure patterns. These results were seen for all invasive cutaneous melanomas combined; the patterns were similar for subtypes and for both invasive and in situ melanoma, with the exception of lentigo maligna melanoma (LMM), which occurs almost exclusively on the face, even at younger ages. Comparison with the earlier study (1976-1979) shows that the age-standardised rates for melanoma excluding LMM have increased by 60%, with the greatest proportional increase being at younger ages; in the recent data, the age-standardised rate for intermittently exposed sites exceeds that for usually exposed sites. Our results confirm that intermittent sun exposure has a greater potential for producing melanoma than continuous exposure at ages below about 50, though at older ages melanoma is more common on body sites with continuous sun exposure.
PubMed ID
9766557 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening with mammography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24016
Source
Lancet. 1993 Jun 12;341(8859):1531; author reply 1531-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-1993
Author
J M Elwood
B. Cox
A K Richardson
Source
Lancet. 1993 Jun 12;341(8859):1531; author reply 1531-2
Date
Jun-12-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - radiography
Female
Humans
Mammography
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Lancet. 1993 Apr 17;341(8851):973-88096941
PubMed ID
8099397 View in PubMed
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Breast disease in nurses, a 30-year study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245227
Source
Can Nurse. 1980 Dec;76(11):38-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1980

Cancer mortality among Chinese, Japanese, and Indians in British Columbia, 1964-73.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246677
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1979 Nov;(53):89-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979
Author
R P Gallagher
J M Elwood
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1979 Nov;(53):89-94
Date
Nov-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
China - ethnology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Japan - ethnology
Male
Neoplasms - mortality
Abstract
We compared age-adjusted mortality rates for cancer of selected sites for Chinese, Japanese, and native Indian residents of British Columbia during the years 1964-73 to the corresponding rates for the white population. Mortality from all cancers of the Chinese did not differ significantly from that of whites. Elevated rates are seen for cancer of the nasopharynx in both sexes, of the liver and esophagus in males, and of the lung in females. Chinese males had a lower mortality than whites from stomach, prostate, and bladder cancer and brain tumors, whereas females had a lower mortality from tumors of the colon, breast, and ovary; both sexes had a lower mortality from leukemia. For Japanese males and females, the mortality rates for all cancers combined were similar to those of the white population. The rates for cancer of the stomach and gallbladder were higher in both sexes; males also showed a higher rate of liver cancer. Prostate and breast cancer mortality rates were lower. Native Indian males had a lower mortality rate from all cancers combined; the difference was significant for stomach, colon, lung, and prostate cancers, and for leukemia. Native Indian females showed a lower rate for ovarian cancer and a higher rate of tumors of the gallbladder and uterine cervix, but their overall cancer mortality was similar to that of whites.
PubMed ID
537637 View in PubMed
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Can vitamins prevent neural tube defects?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241439
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Nov 15;129(10):1088-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1983
Author
J M Elwood
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Nov 15;129(10):1088-92
Date
Nov-15-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Diet
Ethical Review
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Neural Tube Defects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Pregnant Women
Recurrence
Risk
Risk assessment
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Notes
Cites: Nature. 1982 Nov 11-17;300(5888):10211653439
Cites: Lancet. 1983 May 7;1(8332):1027-316133069
Cites: Br J Prev Soc Med. 1969 Nov;23(4):218-255355276
Cites: Lancet. 1971 Jan 2;1(7688):31-34099330
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 1972 Dec;47(256):854-734567074
Cites: Br J Prev Soc Med. 1972 Nov;26(4):219-234658267
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1974 Oct;100(4):288-964607703
Cites: Br J Prev Soc Med. 1975 Mar;29(1):22-61137766
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 1976 Dec;51(12):944-501015847
Cites: Lancet. 1977 Jun 25;1(8026):1323-3269055
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1978 May 20;118(10):1186-9177179
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1979 Jan 15;133(2):119-2584533
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Mar 17;120(6):653-786382
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1979;3(4):377-87382853
Cites: Lancet. 1980 Feb 16;1(8164):339-406101792
Cites: Lancet. 1980 Mar 22;1(8169):6476102643
Cites: Br J Hosp Med. 1980 May;23(5):473-4, 476, 478-80 passim6155962
Cites: JAMA. 1980 Dec 19;244(24):2731-56160265
Cites: Br Med J. 1980 Dec 13;281(6255):1592-47448527
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1981;9(3):201-96169278
Cites: Lancet. 1982 Jan 30;1(8266):275-66120289
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 1982 Jun;24(3):394-57095309
Cites: Practitioner. 1982 Nov;226(1373):1947-536891459
Cites: Ir Med J. 1983 Feb;76(2):78-96341309
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1969 Apr 26;100(16):748-554888983
PubMed ID
6354410 View in PubMed
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Changes in the twinning rate in Canada 1926-70.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254226
Source
Br J Prev Soc Med. 1973 Nov;27(4):236-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1973
Author
J M Elwood
Source
Br J Prev Soc Med. 1973 Nov;27(4):236-41
Date
Nov-1973
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Parity
Pregnancy
Statistics as Topic
Time Factors
Twins
Urban Population
Notes
Cites: Hereditas. 1967;57(3):395-4025585052
Cites: Hum Biol. 1969 Feb;41(1):66-825814949
Cites: Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1970 Jan-Apr;19(1):30-45502042
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1970 Nov;22(6):611-295518457
Cites: J Biosoc Sci. 1972 Oct;4(4):427-345079991
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1955 Jun;7(2):204-1714388009
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1962 Dec;14:410-2514028923
Cites: Lancet. 1964 Dec 12;2(7372):1298-914219153
PubMed ID
4760507 View in PubMed
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50 records – page 1 of 5.