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Combining social network analysis and cluster analysis to identify sexual network types.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160314
Source
Int J STD AIDS. 2007 Nov;18(11):754-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
E. De Rubeis
J L Wylie
D W Cameron
R C Nair
A M Jolly
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. emily.derubeis@uottawa.ca
Source
Int J STD AIDS. 2007 Nov;18(11):754-9
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cluster analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Social Support
Abstract
Increases in the rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) suggest that control programmes may not be effectively targeting diverse subpopulations. The objective of this investigation was to examine STI transmission within different groups, using both social network analysis and cluster analysis. Routine partner notification data were analysed from individuals diagnosed with, or exposed to an STI in Manitoba. Groups were identified and characterized. Three different clusters of groups were identified, comprised of demographically and clinically distinct individuals. A greater understanding of disease transmission patterns within these groups will aid in the development of targeted education and prevention programmes for all STIs.
PubMed ID
18005509 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a new chromogenic agar medium for detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and relative prevalences of O157 and non-O157 STEC in Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118726
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2013 Feb;51(2):466-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
J L Wylie
P. Van Caeseele
M W Gilmour
D. Sitter
C. Guttek
S. Giercke
Author Affiliation
Cadham Provincial Laboratory, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2013 Feb;51(2):466-71
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Escherichia coli Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Escherichia coli O157
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Manitoba - epidemiology
Molecular Typing
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Serotyping - methods
Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli - classification - genetics - growth & development
Abstract
This study assesses the detection performance of CHROMagar STEC medium relative to a reference cytotoxin assay and describes the current relative prevalence of O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotypes within the province of Manitoba, Canada. Over a 10-month period, 205 nonfrozen routine stool submissions to Cadham Provincial Laboratory (CPL) were used to assess the performance of CHROMagar STEC. Of the 205 stools, 14 were identified as true positives by a cytotoxin assay, with resultant CHROMagar STEC sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive and negative predictive values of 85.7%, 95.8%, 60.0%, and 98.9%, respectively. Using a separate panel of 111 STEC strains, CHROMagar STEC was shown to support the growth of 96 (86.5%) isolates. To assess relative prevalence, attempts were made to isolate by any means all STEC strains identified at CPL over a 17-month period. Of 49 isolates (representing 86.0% of all STEC infections detected), only 28.6% were O157 STEC strains. Of the 35 non-O157 STEC strains, 29 were subjected to further molecular analysis. In contrast to earlier results from our area, carriage of stx(2) appears to have increased. Overall, although CHROMagar STEC is not recommended as a primary screen, our results indicate that it is an effective supplemental medium for the isolation of probable STEC strains. Increased isolation of these serotypes is warranted to better understand their prevalence, clinical characteristics, and epidemiology and aid in the development or enhancement of food safety control programs targeting all STEC serotypes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23175263 View in PubMed
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Gonorrhoea and chlamydia core groups and sexual networks in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189607
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2002 Apr;78 Suppl 1:i145-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
A M Jolly
J L Wylie
Author Affiliation
Division of Sexual Health Promotion and STD Prevention and Control, Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. ann_jolly@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2002 Apr;78 Suppl 1:i145-51
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Contact Tracing
Disease Outbreaks
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - transmission
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Recurrence
Sexual Behavior
Sexual Partners
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper summarises the results of the R0 equation in sexually transmitted infection (STI) repeaters in Manitoba, Canada, in the early 1990s, with both concurrent and more recent descriptions of sexual networks in the same population. The research presented provides empirical network and sex partner data to refine definitions of sexual networks and core groups in phase IV epidemics. New challenges for both practice and research are also discussed.
PubMed ID
12083435 View in PubMed
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Patterns of chlamydia and gonorrhea infection in sexual networks in Manitoba, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195821
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2001 Jan;28(1):14-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
J L Wylie
A. Jolly
Author Affiliation
Cadham Provincial Laboratory, Manitoba Health, Winnipeg, Canada. JWylie@health.gov.mb.ca
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2001 Jan;28(1):14-24
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Contact Tracing
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - transmission
Humans
Infant
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Public health nursing
Sexual Behavior
Sexual Partners
Abstract
The use of sexual network analysis has the potential to further our understanding of sexually tranmitted disease (STD) epidemics and contribute to the development of more effective targeted control strategies.
To use sexual network analysis to study transmission patterns of chlamydia and gonorrhea in Manitoba, Canada.
Routinely collected case/contact information gathered by public health nurses was used to construct the sexual network.
Components within the sexual network ranged in size from 2 to 82 people. Two types of components, designated radial and linear, were described. Large linear components resembled the theoretical structure of STD core groups. Geographic analysis of the largest components demonstrated the potential for STD transmission between isolated rural communities and within different areas of an urban center.
The application of sexual network analysis on a provincial basis demonstrated the importance of a centralized, coordinated approach to STD control. The analysis highlights the need for a greater understanding of the causative factors promoting the formation of different component types, the homogeneity and heterogeneity of behaviors within and between components, and the temporal stability of these patterns.
Notes
Comment In: Sex Transm Dis. 2001 Jan;28(1):25-811196041
PubMed ID
11196040 View in PubMed
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Sampling individuals with large sexual networks: an evaluation of four approaches.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194936
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2001 Apr;28(4):200-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
A M Jolly
J L Wylie
Author Affiliation
Division of STD Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. ann_jolly@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2001 Apr;28(4):200-7
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Contact Tracing
Databases, Factual
Disease Transmission, Infectious - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Public Health
Sexual Behavior
Sexual Partners
Social Support
Abstract
Methods for accessing large sexual networks are essential for investigating the mechanisms for the spread of sexually transmitted infections.
Four samples of cases were compared with the total population to determine which identified the largest networks.
Individuals with positive test results for chlamydia during a 6-month period were selected from a laboratory database and linked with sex partner information from a notifiable disease registry. Sexual networks were constructed for a random sample, people with positive results from two or more tests for chlamydia, people with positive tests results for both gonorrhea and chlamydia, and the preceding two groups combined.
The coinfected people combined with the repeaters yielded the highest proportion (47.8%) of large networks (>10 people), followed by the coinfected people, the repeaters, and finally the random sample.
People coinfected with chlamydia and gonorrhea and those with repeated chlamydial infection present ideal opportunities for both research and prevention.
PubMed ID
11318250 View in PubMed
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Sexual networks and sexually transmitted infections: a tale of two cities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193200
Source
J Urban Health. 2001 Sep;78(3):433-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
A M Jolly
S Q Muth
J L Wylie
J J Potterat
Author Affiliation
The Division of STD Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centres for Disease Control, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ann_jolly@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Urban Health. 2001 Sep;78(3):433-45
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group
Age Distribution
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Colorado - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Contact Tracing - methods
Disease Transmission, Infectious
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - transmission
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Neural Networks (Computer)
Phenotype
Population Surveillance
Risk-Taking
Sex Distribution
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Partners
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Social Support
Sociometric Techniques
Abstract
Research on risk behaviors for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) has revealed that they seldom correspond with actual risk of infection. Core groups of people with high-risk behavior who form networks of people linked by sexual contact are essential for STI transmission, but have been overlooked in epidemiological studies. Social network analysis, a subdiscipline of sociology, provides both the methods and analytical techniques to describe and illustrate the effects of sexual networks on STI transmission. Sexual networks of people from Colorado Springs, Colorado, and from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, infected with chlamydia during a 6-month period were compared. In Winnipeg, 442 networks were identified, comprising 571 cases and 663 contacts, ranging in size from 2 to 20 individuals; Colorado Springs data yielded 401 networks, comprising 468 cases and 700 contacts, ranging in size from 2 to 12 individuals. Taking differing partner notification methods and the slightly smaller population size in Colorado Springs into account, the networks from both places were similar in both size and structure. These smaller, sparsely linked networks, peripheral to the core, may form the mechanism by which chlamydia can remain endemic, in contrast with larger, more densely connected networks, closer to the core, which are associated with steep rises in incidence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11564847 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.