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Cancer mortality (1956-1985) among male employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited with respect to occupational exposure to external low-linear-energy-transfer ionizing radiation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221558
Source
Radiat Res. 1993 Mar;133(3):375-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
M A Gribbin
J L Weeks
G R Howe
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Institute of Canada Epidemiology Unit, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Radiat Res. 1993 Mar;133(3):375-80
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Energy Transfer
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - mortality
Nuclear Energy
Occupational Exposure
Radiation Dosage
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Abstract
The mortality experience between 1956 and 1985 of 8977 males employed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is reported. A total of 4260 men, 47% of the cohort, were exposed to low doses of external ionizing radiation at low dose rates, with a mean cumulative equivalent dose of 52.1 mSv. For cancers as a whole the excess relative risk, based on 227 deaths, was 0.36% per 10 mSv (90% confidence bounds -0.46, 2.45). This is quite comparable to the corresponding estimate based on the atomic bomb survivors study. There was a positive association between radiation dose and death from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia) P = 0.058. However, this was based on only four deaths and hence cannot sensibly be compared to estimates based on high-dose studies. The present results suggest that, for cancer as a whole, risk estimates based on high-dose studies are unlikely to underestimate risks substantially for low-dose and low-dose-rate exposures.
PubMed ID
8451390 View in PubMed
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Epidemic of "shocks" in telephone operators: lessons for the medical community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230992
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Apr 1;140(7):816-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1989
Author
A. Yassi
J L Weeks
K. Samson
M B Raber
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Apr 1;140(7):816-20
Date
Apr-1-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Outbreaks
Electricity - adverse effects
Equipment Failure
Humans
Manitoba
Mass Behavior
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Telephone - instrumentation
Abstract
In January 1986 two brief power failures occurring within an hour of each other affected the operation of visual display terminals in a section of the Manitoba Telephone System. After the power failures three operators reported an alarming tingling sensation in their arms and one side of their body, which they called "shocks". Other operators then began to report incidents of numbness and tingling in their limbs, face or head as well as other, diffuse symptoms. During the next 2 weeks 92 such incidents were reported by 55 operators. The media carried alarming headlines, and medical practitioners perpetuated the label of "electric shock". Despite extensive investigation, which revealed no electrical fault, the section was closed by the regulatory authority, and an independent medical panel was convened to review the findings. The panel concluded that there was no immediate hazard to life or health and recommended continued workplace assessment and follow-up of affected operators; however, because the panel lacked electrical engineering expertise, uncertainty persisted as to the cause of the events. The reports of incidents persisted, peaking in association with continued rumours of diagnoses of "nerve damage". In the fall of 1987 a multidisciplinary committee ruled out as causative factors all known hazards other than electrostatic shock and occupational stress. This costly and lengthy investigation underlines the danger in regarding collective stress reaction as a diagnosis of exclusion. It highlights the need to scrutinize objective evidence before validating potentially unfounded concerns and underlines the desirability of considering the psychosocial effects of technology and regimented tasks.
Notes
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1974;252:1-464532462
Cites: J Human Stress. 1976 Sep;2(3):35-461018119
Cites: Hum Factors. 1981 Aug;23(4):387-4007275107
Cites: J Occup Med. 1981 Jan;23(1):22-67225196
Cites: J Occup Med. 1981 Sep;23(9):635-87277054
Cites: J Occup Med. 1983 Jun;25(6):459-646886848
Cites: J Occup Med. 1985 Dec;27(12):867-723910765
Cites: J Occup Med. 1987 Dec;29(12):942-82892901
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1986 May-Jun;1(3):201-23772590
PubMed ID
2924232 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Sep 17;117(6):566-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-17-1977
Author
J L Weeks
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Sep 17;117(6):566-7
Date
Sep-17-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Environmental health
Humans
Neoplasms - etiology
Nuclear Energy
Nuclear Medicine
PubMed ID
902200 View in PubMed
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Occupational medicine in Canada: an end or a new beginning?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103221
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Feb 1;142(3):215-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1990
Author
J L Weeks
Author Affiliation
Whiteshell Research, Pinawa, Man.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Feb 1;142(3):215-9
Date
Feb-1-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Occupational Health Services - trends
Occupational Medicine - trends
Abstract
Occupational medicine is frequently described in the broad context of the provision of occupational health services as a whole. Although this approach reflects the concepts currently underlying the delivery of occupational health services in Canada and in other countries, it is sometimes necessary to consider the problems that relate specifically to occupational medicine and to those who practise in this field. In this article some of these problems are discussed and suggestions made as to the way in which occupational medical practice may develop in Canada.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1989 Jul;46(7):433-42765415
Comment In: CMAJ. 1990 Jul 1;143(1):9-122400435
PubMed ID
2302612 View in PubMed
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