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[Physicians' and medical students' perception of environmental risks]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22479
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Sep 16;158(38):5291-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-16-1996
Author
P. Grandjean
J B Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Institut for Sygdomsforebyggelse og Helsetjenesteforskning, fagområdet for miljømedicin. Odense Universitet.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Sep 16;158(38):5291-5
Date
Sep-16-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Denmark
Education, Medical, Continuing
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Students, Medical - psychology
Abstract
Evaluation of environmental risks involves several subjective elements, including the individual reaction to the mere presence of such risks. We have carried out a study of students participating in postgraduate courses in environmental and occupational medicine and of medical students. They received a form that contained twelve statements and were asked to indicate whether they agreed or disagreed with these statements. Almost half of the medical students agreed that one must count on developing cancer if one is exposed to a carcinogenic chemical. Responses to other statements were also contrary to the basic principle of the dose-response relationship. A majority in both groups disagreed with the statement that people are unnecessarily concerned about small amounts of pesticides in the environment. Compared to the medical students, the postgraduate students were more sceptical and less concerned regarding environmental risks. These results are in general agreement with a study carried out in the US using the same statements. The results are an indication that we do not necessarily react the same way with regard to information on risks. When communicating such information, the needs and the background of the audience must be appreciated.
PubMed ID
8966777 View in PubMed
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[Adverse effects following sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Review and 2 case reports]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65948
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1979 Mar 12;141(11):709-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-12-1979

Recurrence risk in spontaneous pneumothorax. A follow-up of 178 initial occurrences in a Danish county in a ten-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108949
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1965;356:160-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1965
Author
B. Andersen
J B Nielsen
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1965;356:160-6
Date
1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Pneumothorax - epidemiology
PubMed ID
5221687 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dermal in vitro penetration of methiocarb, paclobutrazol, and pirimicarb: effect of nonylphenolethoxylate and protective gloves.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10260
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Feb;109(2):129-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
J B Nielsen
H R Andersen
Author Affiliation
The Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. jbnielsen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Feb;109(2):129-32
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadaver
Carbamates - pharmacokinetics
Denmark
Detergents
Ethylene Glycols
Female
Gloves, Protective
Humans
Methiocarb - pharmacokinetics
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Pesticides - pharmacokinetics
Pyrimidines
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Absorption
Triazoles - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
Dermal exposure has become the major route of human occupational exposure to pesticides. Detergents are used as part of formulated pesticide products and are known to change the barrier properties of human skin in vitro. However, studies on the influence of detergents as well as protective glove materials on dermal penetration of pesticides are scarce. In an experiment using in vitro static diffusion cells mounted with human skin, we evaluated the effect of nonylphenol-ethoxylate on dermal penetration of three extensively used pesticides--methiocarb, paclobutrazol, and pirimicarb--and the protection against dermal penetration offered by protective gloves made of latex or nitrile. There was a general tendency, though not statistically significant for all pesticides, for nonylphenolethoxylate to decrease the percutaneous penetration of the three pesticides. The nitrile generally offered better protection against percutaneous penetration of pesticides than did latex, but the degree of protection decreased over time and depended on the pesticides used.
PubMed ID
11266321 View in PubMed
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[Blood lead concentration in the Danish population after introduction of lead-free gasoline]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10831
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Aug 10;160(33):4768-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1998
Author
J B Nielsen
P. Grandjean
P J Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Odense Universitet, Afdeling for Miljømedicin.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Aug 10;160(33):4768-71
Date
Aug-10-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure
Female
Gasoline
Humans
Lead - blood
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Blood lead concentrations in a Danish reference population were related to information from an extensive questionnaire on work, environment and life style. The mean concentration of lead in blood was 0.167 mumol/L, i.e. significantly lower than in previous studies. This finding is in accordance with the fact that less than 10% of petrol used in Denmark contained lead additives (up to 0.15 g/L). An important finding was that the well-documented predictors for lead in blood at higher concentration levels, such as age, gender, menopausal status, and intake of alcohol, are still valid in a low-level exposure situation. In addition, a strong and negative correlation was found between blood lead concentrations and dietary supplementation with vitamins and minerals. The present data indicate that lead exposure may still constitute a health risk in a small proportion of adult males and postmenopausal women.
PubMed ID
9715658 View in PubMed
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Predictors of blood lead concentrations in the lead-free gasoline era.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10868
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1998 Apr;24(2):153-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
J B Nielsen
P. Grandjean
P J Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Health, Odense University, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1998 Apr;24(2):153-6
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Female
Gasoline - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Lead - pharmacokinetics
Lead Poisoning - blood - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - blood - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Trace Elements - administration & dosage
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Blood lead concentrations in a Danish reference population were related to information from an extensive questionnaire on work, environment, and life-style. METHODS: Data were gathered for 209 persons by means of a questionnaire and blood lead analyses. RESULTS: The mean concentration of lead in blood was 0.167 micromol/l (ie, significantly lower than in previous studies). This finding is in accordance with the fact that less than 10% of the gasoline used in Denmark contains lead additives (up to 0.15 g/l). An important finding was that the well-documented predictors for lead in blood at higher concentration levels, such as age, gender, menopausal status, and intake of alcohol, are still valid in a low-level exposure situation. In addition, a strong and negative correlation was found between blood lead concentrations and dietary supplementation with vitamins and minerals. CONCLUSIONS: The present data indicate that lead exposure may still constitute a health risk in a small proportion of adult men and postmenopausal women.
PubMed ID
9630064 View in PubMed
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[Frequency of Chlamydia trachomatis in women under 35 years of age consulting the general practitioner for gynecologic or obstetric reasons].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229473
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Mar 5;152(10):662-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-1990
Author
J B Nielsen
H E Kallerup
A D Ingvardsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Mar 5;152(10):662-3
Date
Mar-5-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Denmark - epidemiology
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Abstract
In a general practice, we examined 173 women under the age of 35 years who sought help for gynaecological or obstetric reasons, consecutively. 18% of all of the examinations for Chlamydia rendered positive results. Chlamydia infection was commonest in the younger age groups. The case histories and objective findings were unsuited for predicting which of the patients had Chlamydia infection. Routine examination for Chlamydia is recommended in women under 25 years in general practice.
PubMed ID
2321282 View in PubMed
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Influence of number needed to treat, costs and outcome on preferences for a preventive drug.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53229
Source
Fam Pract. 2005 Feb;22(1):126-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
J. Nexøe
I S Kristiansen
D. Gyrd-Hansen
J B Nielsen
Author Affiliation
University of Southern Denmark, Research Unit of General Practice, Winsløwparken 19, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark. jnexoe@health.sdu.dk
Source
Fam Pract. 2005 Feb;22(1):126-31
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Denmark
Drug Therapy - adverse effects - economics
Family Practice
Female
Heart Diseases - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The number needed to treat (NNT) has been widely recommended for communicating benefits from risk reductions. It has been claimed that NNT is easily understood and that it has intuitive meaning. There are, however, only few studies of lay people's understanding of NNT. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to explore whether lay people are sensitive to the magnitude of treatment effectiveness as expressed in terms of NNT, and whether the sensitivity is influenced by variation in the type of health outcome, variation in patients' payment for the treatment or variation in the type of side effects. METHODS: In total, 2326 non-institutionalized Danes aged 18-91 years were interviewed face to face and asked whether they would consent to a treatment against a somewhat increased risk of death or heart attack. The respondents were allocated to different levels of effectiveness of treatment expressed as NNT of 10, 100, 200 or 400, different costs and different descriptions of adverse effects. RESULTS: The odds for consenting to therapy were little influenced by the magnitude of NNT, but were greater among married respondents and among those who had side effects presented in terms of headache and constipation. CONCLUSION: In this study, the respondents' choice of treatment was largely insensitive to the magnitude of NNT independently of variations in type of health outcome and costs. NNT may not be easily understood by lay people.
PubMed ID
15640298 View in PubMed
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Faith Moves Mountains-Mountains Move Faith: Two Opposite Epidemiological Forces in Research on Religion and Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284780
Source
J Relig Health. 2017 Feb;56(1):294-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
N C Hvidt
D. Hvidtjørn
K. Christensen
J B Nielsen
J. Søndergaard
Source
J Relig Health. 2017 Feb;56(1):294-304
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Denmark
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Religion
Surveys and Questionnaires
Twins - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Research suggests opposite epidemiological forces in religion and health: (1). Faith seems to move mountains in the sense that religion is associated with positive health outcomes. (2). Mountains of bad health seem to move faith. We reflected on these forces in a population of 3000 young Danish twins in which all religiosity measures were associated with severe disease. We believe the reason for this novel finding is that the sample presents as a particularly secular population-based study and that the second epidemiological force has gained the upper hand in this sample. We suggest that all cross-sectional research on religion and health should be interpreted in light of such opposite epidemiological forces potentially diluting each other.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27541015 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.