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Acute bronchitis in adults. How close do we come to its aetiology in general practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207475
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1997 Sep;15(3):156-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
J S Jonsson
J A Sigurdsson
K G Kristinsson
M. Guthnadóttir
S. Magnusson
Author Affiliation
Gardabaer Community Health Centre, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1997 Sep;15(3):156-60
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bronchitis - blood - diagnosis - microbiology - virology
C-Reactive Protein - analysis - diagnostic use
Chlamydia Infections
Chlamydophila pneumoniae
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Middle Aged
Mycoplasma pneumoniae
Pneumonia, Mycoplasma
Prospective Studies
Virus Diseases - blood - diagnosis
Abstract
To investigate how close we can come to the aetiology of acute bronchitis in adults in a primary care setting.
Prospective study.
General practice population in Gardabaer district, south-western Iceland.
140 patients > or = 16 years old who were diagnosed as having acute bronchitis during a two-year period (1992-1993).
Laboratory investigations (twice with a minimum four-week interval), used in general practice to analyse respiratory tract infections. They included serology for Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, respiratory tract viruses, and the level of C-reactive protein.
Of a total of 140 patients, two blood samples were taken on scheduled time in 113 patients. Serology confirmed recent infection in 18 (16%) of these patients. Only two (2%) had a bacterial infection (one C. pneumoniae, one M. pneumoniae). The others (84%) did not have a significant increase in antibody titres. Only four (4%) had C-reactive protein levels higher than 48 mg/l.
The study indicates that it is difficult to come close to a precise aetiology with respect to infectious agents of acute bronchitis in general practice. We conclude that the disease is rarely caused by atypical bacteria such as C. pneumoniae and M. pneumoniae, and rarely caused by bacterial infections severe enough significantly to increase the level of C-reactive protein.
PubMed ID
9323784 View in PubMed
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Adverse reactions to food and food allergy in young children in Iceland and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33350
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1999 Mar;17(1):30-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
I. Kristjansson
B. Ardal
J S Jonsson
J A Sigurdsson
M. Foldevi
B. Björkstén
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1999 Mar;17(1):30-4
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Infant
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of adverse reactions to food and food allergy in Icelandic and Swedish 18-month-old children. DESIGN: Prospective multicentre comparative study. SETTING: Primary health care centres in Sweden and Iceland. SUBJECTS: A total of 324 children in Iceland and 328 in Sweden who attended for regular 18-month check-up. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adverse reaction to food according to questionnaire, and food allergy according to skin prick tests and double blind food challenge tests. RESULTS: Adverse reactions to food were reported in 27% of children in Iceland and 28% in Sweden. Food allergy was confirmed in 2.0% in both countries. Allergy among other family members was reported in 45% of the Icelandic children and 62% in the Swedish (p
PubMed ID
10229990 View in PubMed
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Alcohol habits in Swedish women: observations from the population study of women in Gothenburg, Sweden 1968-1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10788
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1998 Sep-Oct;33(5):533-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Bengtsson
P. Allebeck
L. Lissner
C. Björkelund
T. Hällström
J A Sigurdsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1998 Sep-Oct;33(5):533-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a prospective population study of women in Gothenburg, Sweden, three examinations were conducted with 12-year intervals between 1968-1969 and 1992-1993. There were 1462 participants aged 38-60 years in the baseline study in 1968-1969, with a participation rate of 90.1%. This paper describes longitudinal changes and secular trends with respect to women's alcohol habits. An alcohol frequency questionnaire was validated at baseline and was re-administered at all examinations. Between 1968-1969 and 1980-1981, the proportion of alcohol abstainers decreased significantly both in 38-year-old and 50-year-old women. Women reporting alcohol intake at least once per week had higher socio-economic status and higher education than other women. Serum gamma-glutamyl transpepsidase concentration was higher in women with the heavier alcohol intake, while a number of potential cardiovascular risk indicators were higher in women with the lower intake. Daily intake of wine and spirits was about as common at all three examinations, whereas moderate intake of wine and spirits was more common in 1980-1981 and 1992-1993 than in 1968-1969. There seemed to be an increase in overall consumption of alcohol, mainly due to the increase in moderate drinking, but there was no indication of a large increase in heavy consumption of alcohol.
PubMed ID
9811207 View in PubMed
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Bacteriuria in a population sample of women: 24-year follow-up study. Results from the prospective population-based study of women in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204379
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 1998 Jul;32(4):284-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
C. Bengtsson
U. Bengtsson
C. Björkelund
K. Lincoln
J A Sigurdsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Vasa Hospital, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 1998 Jul;32(4):284-9
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bacteriuria - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aims of the study were to estimate the prevalence of bacteriuria in a female urban population, to follow up the same population over the years, and to relate bacteriuria to long-term prognosis with respect to mortality and kidney disease. The study was based on a randomly selected population sample comprising 1462 women aged 38-60 years at entrance to the study in 1968-69 with an initial participation rate of 90.1%. Bacteriuria was observed in 3-5%, increasing with age, and most often asymptomatic. Bacteriuria on one occasion meant increased risk of having bacteriuria 6 and 12 years later. The percentages of different types of bacteria and the resistance pattern were similar initially and at follow-up studies after 6 and 12 years. There were no differences in mortality or incidence of severe kidney disease during a 24-year follow-up between those with and those without bacteriuria in the baseline study.
PubMed ID
9764457 View in PubMed
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Breast-feeding in Iceland. Predictive factors and effects of interventive measures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34885
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1996 Mar;24(1):62-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
H. Freysteinsson
J A Sigurdsson
Author Affiliation
Community Health Centre of Akureyri, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1996 Mar;24(1):62-6
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mothers - education
Multivariate Analysis
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyse how long babies born in Akureyri district in 1990 were breast-fed, compared with babies born in 1985. Possible predictive factors for the length of breast-feeding were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses. From 1985 to 1990, the proportion of infants exclusively breast-fed at the age of 3 months increased from 57% to 70% (p
PubMed ID
8740878 View in PubMed
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Do antihypertensive drugs precipitate diabetes?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48881
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 Dec 1;289(6457):1495-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1984
Author
C. Bengtsson
G. Blohmé
L. Lapidus
O. Lindquist
H. Lundgren
E. Nyström
K. Petersen
J A Sigurdsson
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 Dec 1;289(6457):1495-7
Date
Dec-1-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - adverse effects
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body Weight - drug effects
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - chemically induced
Diuretics - adverse effects
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
A longitudinal population study of 1462 women aged 38-60 was carried out from 1968-9 to 1980-1 in Gothenburg, Sweden. The initial and follow up examinations included questions concerning history of diabetes and antihypertensive treatment. A considerably increased risk of developing diabetes was observed for subjects with hypertension taking diuretics (895 patient years), subjects taking beta blockers (682 patient years), and subjects taking a combination of diuretics and beta blockers (281 patient years) compared with subjects not taking antihypertensive drugs (13 855 control years). When diuretics and beta blockers were compared no difference was found in relative risk. Despite this increased risk, and because little is known about the relation between other forms of antihypertensive treatment and diabetes, diuretics and beta blockers should remain the treatments of choice in arterial hypertension.
PubMed ID
6150745 View in PubMed
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Do antimicrobials increase the carriage rate of penicillin resistant pneumococci in children? Cross sectional prevalence study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34682
Source
BMJ. 1996 Aug 17;313(7054):387-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-17-1996
Author
V A Arason
K G Kristinsson
J A Sigurdsson
G. Stefánsdóttir
S. Mölstad
S. Gudmundsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Sólvangur Health Centre, University of Iceland, Hafnarfjördur, Iceland.
Source
BMJ. 1996 Aug 17;313(7054):387-91
Date
Aug-17-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Carrier State - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Nasopharyngeal Diseases - epidemiology
Nasopharynx - microbiology
Penicillin resistance
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Streptococcus pneumoniae - isolation & purification
Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Combination - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the correlation of antimicrobial consumption with the carriage rate of penicillin resistant and multiresistant pneumococci in children. DESIGN: Cross sectional and analytical prevalence study. SETTING: Five different communities in Iceland. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Prevalence of nasopharyngeal carriage of penicillin resistant pneumococci in children aged under 7 years in relation to antibiotic use as determined by information from parents, patient's records, and total sales of antimicrobials from local pharmacies in four study areas. RESULTS: Total antimicrobial sales for children (6223 prescriptions) among the four areas for which data were available ranged from 9.6 to 23.2 defined daily doses per 1000 children daily (1.1 to 2.6 courses yearly per child). Children under 2 consumed twice as much as 2-6 year olds (20.5 v 10.9 defined daily doses per 1000 children daily). Nasopharyngeal specimens were obtained from 919 children, representing 15-38% of the peer population groups in the different areas. Pneumococci were carried by 484 (52.7%) of the children, 47 (9.7%) of the isolates being resistant to penicillin or multiresistant. By multivariate analysis age (
PubMed ID
8761224 View in PubMed
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Effects of dietary intervention on serum lipids in factory workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50188
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1994 Jun;12(2):93-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
R. Thorsteinsson
A. Johannesson
H. Jonsson
T. Thorhallsson
J A Sigurdsson
Author Affiliation
Akranes Health Care Centre, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1994 Jun;12(2):93-9
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Dietary Services
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Intervention Studies
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To assess the effect of workplace-oriented dietary intervention on serum lipids. DESIGN--A cohort study. Screening for blood lipids and subsequent dietary intervention performed at a ferro-alloy factory where all the workers have at least one meal per working day served by the factory kitchen. SETTING--Employees at Grundartangi ferro-alloy factory, Iceland. SUBJECTS--From 1 June 1989 to 1 June 1991, 155 workers participated in the screening and prevention programme. INTERVENTION--Changing the food served by the kitchen to 200 workers by lowering the total number of calories and increasing the content of fibre and unsaturated fats in the diet. RESULTS--The mean serum cholesterol was lowered from 6.64 to 6.09 mmol/l or by -8.28% for the whole group (p
PubMed ID
7973200 View in PubMed
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Health problems in family practice. An Icelandic multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34892
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1996 Mar;14(1):4-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
T. Njalsson
J A Sigurdsson
R G McAuley
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Iceland Solvangur Health Centre, Hafnarfjordur, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1996 Mar;14(1):4-12
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Primary Health Care - utilization
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Utilization Review
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To establish epidemiological data on the health problems within family practice in Iceland by multicentre analysis of well-defined geographic areas. DESIGN--Prospective practice audit. SUBJECTS AND SETTINGS--Thirteen Icelandic health centres (HC) with computerized contact data from 1 January - 31 December 1988. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Health problems during one year in a population, as perceived by health care providers. RESULTS--A total of 176 384 health problems during one year in a population of 31 248, as perceived by the health care provider, were analysed. Musculoskeletal disorders accounted for 9.3% of all health problems (prevalence 210.6/1000 inhabitants), respiratory disorders 9.4% (189.9/1000), accidents 7.4% (203.2/1000), cardiovascular disorders 7.4% (112.0/1000) and mental disorders 6.1% (87.6/1000). The commonest single health problems were: hypertension, upper respiratory tract infections and non-articular rheumatism. The health problems accounting for the most frequent contacts were: mental disorders (4.0 contacts per individual per year), cardiovascular (3.7), and endocrine, nutrition and metabolic (3.2). CONCLUSION--Problem-oriented medical records from HCs, computerized in a uniform standardized way, can give extensive information about the content and burden of health problems in family practice and presumably public health. Our results are valuable because the population (the denominator) and the geographic study area are well defined. This information is an important part of clinical epidemiology and can be of great value for educators and health care planners.
PubMed ID
8725088 View in PubMed
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Herpes zoster in children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33623
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1998 Oct;17(10):905-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
G. Petursson
S. Helgason
S. Gudmundsson
J A Sigurdsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1998 Oct;17(10):905-8
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Herpes Zoster - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Infant
Male
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To follow the clinical course of herpes zoster and to determine the incidence, frequency of complications and association with malignancy in children and adolescents. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study in a primary health care setting in Iceland. The main outcome measures were age and sex distribution of patients and discomfort or pain 1, 3 and 12 months after the rash and general health before and 3 to 6 years after the zoster episode. RESULTS: During observation of the target population for a period of 75750 person years, 121 episodes of acute zoster developed (incidence 1.6/1000/year) in 118 patients. End points were gained for all 118 patients after 554 person years of follow-up. Systemic acyclovir was never used. No patient developed postherpetic neuralgia, moderate or severe pain or any pain lasting longer than 1 month from start of the rash (95% confidence interval, 0 to 0.03). Potential immunomodulating conditions were diagnosed in 3 patients (2.5%) within 3 months of contracting zoster. Only 5 (4%) had a history of severe diseases. CONCLUSIONS: The probability of postherpetic neuralgia in children and adolescents is extremely low. Zoster is seldom associated with undiagnosed malignancy in the primary care setting.
PubMed ID
9802633 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.