Skip header and navigation

Refine By

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Neuromodulation. 2013 Nov-Dec;16(6):506-13; discussion 513
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaare Meier
Lone Nikolajsen
Morten Flink
Ronnie Simonsen
Ioanna Milidou
Troels Staehelin Jensen
Jens Christian Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Pain Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Neurosurgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Anesthesiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; ITmedico, Aarhus, Denmark; Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; and Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Neuromodulation. 2013 Nov-Dec;16(6):506-13; discussion 513
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Chronic Pain - therapy
Computer Security
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Employment
Humans
Internet
Neuralgia - drug therapy - therapy
Neurosurgical Procedures - adverse effects
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Software
Spinal Cord Stimulation - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
?? Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is increasingly gaining widespread use as a treatment for chronic pain. A widely used electronic registry could play a pivotal role in improving this complex and cost-?intensive treatment. We aimed to construct a comprehensive, universally available data base for SCS.
?? The design considerations behind a new online data base for SCS are presented; basic structure, technical issues, research applications, and future perspectives are described.
?? The Aarhus Neuromodulation Database covers core SCS treatment parameters, including procedure-?related details and complications, and features recording of key success parameters such as pain intensity, work status, and quality of life. It combines easy access to patient information with exhaustive data extraction options, and it can readily be adapted and expanded to suit different needs, including other neuromodulation treatment modalities.
?? We believe that the data base described in this article offers a powerful and versatile data collection tool suited for both clinicians and researchers in the field. The basic data base structure is immediately available on a no?-cost basis, and we invite our colleagues to make use of the data base as part of the efforts to further the field of neuromodulation.
PubMed ID
22882331 View in PubMed
Less detail

Developmental Coordination Disorder in Children with a History of Infantile Colic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268211
Source
J Pediatr. 2015 Sep;167(3):725-30.e1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Ioanna Milidou
Morten Søndergaard Lindhard
Charlotte Søndergaard
Jørn Olsen
Tine Brink Henriksen
Source
J Pediatr. 2015 Sep;167(3):725-30.e1-2
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Colic - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Motor Skills Disorders - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Abstract
To investigate whether children with a history of infantile colic showed impaired motor development at age 7 years compared with unaffected peers.
We studied 27,940 children from the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2002), including 1879 (6.8%) with a history of infantile colic. Infantile colic was defined according to the modified Wessel criteria as crying for more than 3 hours per day and more than 3 days per week. We compared the parental Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire 2007 (DCDQ'07) scores in children with and without infantile colic after adjustment for intrauterine exposures, feeding type, parity, maternal age, socioeconomic status, Apgar score, gestational age, and birth weight.
Children with a history of infantile colic had an elevated risk of scoring above the predefined cutoff limit of possible or suspected developmental coordination disorder (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.7; P = .034). The mean total DCDQ'07 score was -0.4 point (95% CI, -0.8 to 0) lower in children with a history of infantile colic. Moreover, they were at higher risk for a low total score (OR for a 10-point decrease, 1.1; 95% CI, 1.0-1.1; P = .006) and a low general coordination score (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5, P = .000) in the DCDQ'07. All associations appeared to be stronger among boys, but no statistically significant effect measure modification between infantile colic and sex was found.
We found no evidence of a strong association between infantile colic and developmental coordination disorder in this large Danish cohort.
PubMed ID
26164380 View in PubMed
Less detail

Gestational age, small for gestational age, and infantile colic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258013
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Mar;28(2):138-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Ioanna Milidou
Charlotte Søndergaard
Morten Søndergaard Jensen
Jørn Olsen
Tine Brink Henriksen
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Mar;28(2):138-45
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colic - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Life Style
Male
Maternal Age
Mothers
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Preterm and growth restricted infants may have developmental delays and deviations from normal organ function related to the gastrointestinal tract and the central nervous system. Since both organ systems are hypothesised to be involved in the pathogenesis of infantile colic, a condition characterised by excessive crying during the first months of life, impaired fetal growth and preterm birth may be risk factors for infantile colic.
A total of 62,761 liveborn singletons from the Danish National Birth Cohort (1996 to 2002) were studied. Infantile colic was defined according to Wessel's modified criteria based on maternal interview conducted at 6 months post-partum.
A total of 2605 (4.2%) infants were born preterm, 54,441 (86.7%) at term, and 5715 (9.1%) post-term. A total of 4964 (7.9%) infants fulfilled Wessel's modified criteria for infantile colic. The risk for infantile colic increased with decreasing gestational age after adjustment for covariates. The highest odds [odds ratio (95% confidence interval)] was observed for infants born before 32 completed gestational weeks (1.5 [95% CI 1.0, 2.2], reference: 40 gestational weeks). Small for gestational age infants (birthweight below 10th percentile) had an increased odds of infantile colic (1.2 [95% CI 1.1, 1.3]) in all gestational age groups.
We observed an increased risk of infantile colic in preterm and small for gestational age infants in a large cohort. Our results suggest that the aetiology of infantile colic may be found in the prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal period.
PubMed ID
24261325 View in PubMed
Less detail

Neonatal morbidity after spontaneous labor onset prior to intended cesarean delivery at term: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281473
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2017 Apr;96(4):479-486
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Julie Glavind
Ioanna Milidou
Niels Uldbjerg
Rikke Maimburg
Tine B Henriksen
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2017 Apr;96(4):479-486
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - mortality
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Labor Presentation
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Registries
Abstract
We aimed to investigate if labor onset before planned cesarean delivery (CD) affects the risk of neonatal admission, respiratory distress, or neonatal infectious morbidity.
Our cohort included singleton term pregnant women with intended CD who delivered at Aarhus University Hospital from 1990 to 2012. Two groups of women were identified: women with intended CD performed before labor (nonlabor CD) and women with intended CD performed after spontaneous labor onset (labor-onset CD); in both groups there was no other maternal or fetal medical indication for an immediate CD or for early-term CD scheduling. Data were stratified in early-term (37-38 weeks) and full-term (39-40 weeks) deliveries. The main outcome measures were neonatal admission, respiratory distress and neonatal infectious morbidity.
Among 103 919 live births, 5071 deliveries were nonlabor CDs and 731 were labor-onset CDs. Compared to nonlabor CD, labor-onset CD was associated with similar risks of neonatal admission and respiratory distress, both at early and full term, but with a two- to three-fold increased risk of newborn septicemia or antibiotic treatment at early term. Labor onset at early term was associated with a lower risk of maternal blood loss of more than 500 mL, but with a higher risk of postoperative antibiotic treatment and endometritis.
Labor onset before planned CD was not associated with a decrease in neonatal respiratory morbidity, but may be associated with increased risks of neonatal infection.
PubMed ID
28100003 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nicotine replacement therapy during pregnancy and infantile colic in the offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126823
Source
Pediatrics. 2012 Mar;129(3):e652-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Ioanna Milidou
Tine Brink Henriksen
Morten Søndergaard Jensen
Jørn Olsen
Charlotte Søndergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Herning Regional Hospital, Herning, Denmark. ioanna.milidou@ki.au.dk
Source
Pediatrics. 2012 Mar;129(3):e652-8
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Colic - chemically induced - epidemiology - physiopathology
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Nicotine - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods
Tobacco Use Cessation Products
Abstract
To investigate the associations between use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and smoking during pregnancy and infantile colic in the offspring.
We used data from maternal interviews (from pregnancy and at 6 months post partum) from the Danish National Birth Cohort (1996-2002). We included 63?128 live-born singletons with complete information on nicotine exposure during pregnancy and infantile colic symptoms as recorded at 6 months of age.
A total of 46?660 infants (73.9%) were unexposed to nicotine during pregnancy; 207 (0.3%) were exposed to NRT, 15?016 (23.8%) were exposed to smoking, and 1245 (2.0%) to both. A total of 4974 (7.9%) infants fulfilled Wessel's modified criteria for infantile colic. Prenatal nicotine exposure was associated with elevated risk for infantile colic in the offspring. Compared with the unexposed, NRT users had an adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval) of 1.6 (1.0-2.5; P = .03), smokers had OR = 1.3 (1.2-1.4), and women who both smoked and used NRT had OR = 1.6 (1.3-1.9). Partners' smoking was not associated with infantile colic after adjustment for maternal smoking.
We corroborated the association between smoking and infantile colic after adjustment for several possible confounders in a large cohort study. Moreover, we found that infants exposed to NRT prenatally had an increased risk for infantile colic of the same magnitude as those exposed to tobacco smoke. Thus, nicotine may play a role in the pathogenesis of infantile colic.
PubMed ID
22351887 View in PubMed
Less detail

Seasonal variation of dystocia in a large Danish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259661
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e94432
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christine Rohr Thomsen
Niels Uldbjerg
Lone Hvidman
Hjördís Ósk Atladóttir
Tine Brink Henriksen
Ioanna Milidou
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e94432
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dystocia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Seasons
Young Adult
Abstract
Dystocia is one of the most frequent causes of cesarean delivery in nulliparous women. Despite this, its causes are largely unknown. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) has been found in the myometrium. Thus, it is possible that vitamin D affects the contractility of the myometrium and may be involved in the pathogenesis of dystocia. Seasonal variation of dystocia in areas with distinct seasonal variation in sunlight exposure, like Denmark, could imply that vitamin D may play a role. This study examined whether there was seasonal variation in the incidence of dystocia in a Danish population.
We used information from a cohort of 34,261 nulliparous women with singleton pregnancies, spontaneous onset of labor between 37 and 42 completed gestational weeks, and vertex fetal presentation. All women gave birth between 1992 and 2010 at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby. Logistic regression combined with cubic spline was used to estimate the seasonal variation for each outcome after adjusting for calendar time.
No evidence for seasonal variation was found for any of the outcomes: acute cesarean delivery due to dystocia (p?=?0.44); instrumental vaginal delivery due to dystocia (p?=?0.69); oxytocin augmentation due to dystocia (p?=?0.46); and overall dystocia (p?=?0.91).
No seasonal variation in the incidence of dystocia was observed in a large cohort of Danish women. This may reflect no association between vitamin D and dystocia, or alternatively that other factors with seasonal variation and influence on the occurrence of dystocia attenuate such an association.
Notes
Cites: Epidemiology. 2007 Mar;18(2):240-517202868
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(2):216-2118231891
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2008;8:4518837972
Cites: Mol Aspects Med. 2008 Dec;29(6):453-6118786559
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Mar;94(3):940-519106272
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(4):402-719330572
Cites: Epidemiology. 2009 Sep;20(5):720-619451820
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Oct;203(4):326.e1-326.e1020708166
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Dec;116(6):1281-721099592
Cites: Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2011 Jan;74(1):37-4321039730
Cites: Comput Methods Programs Biomed. 2011 Dec;104(3):333-4021996029
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Dec;91(12):1357-6722974137
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2013 Feb;92(2):128-3922623177
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013 Mar;67(3):270-423388663
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2013 Jul;122(1):33-4023743454
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Mar;79(3):174-910716297
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Apr;95(4):589-9510725495
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2001 May;90(5):577-911430721
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2001 Jul;185(1):128-3411483916
Cites: BJOG. 2001 Nov;108(11):1116-911762648
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2002 Mar;99(3):409-1811864667
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2002 Mar;81(3):222-611966478
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Dec;102(6):1445-5414662243
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2003 Dec;88(12):5766-7214671166
Cites: J Soc Gynecol Investig. 2004 Feb;11(2):104-1214980312
Cites: Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2004 Jul 15;115(1):17-2215223159
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1983 Nov 15;147(6):662-66638110
Cites: J Biol Chem. 1985 Jul 25;260(15):8882-912991224
Cites: BMJ. 1993 Jul 24;307(6898):234-98369684
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Aug;86(2):188-927617348
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1998 Mar;77(3):303-69539276
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 May;81(5):1060-415883429
Cites: J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2005 Nov;18(5):319-2416390791
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Aug;84(2):350-3; quiz 468-916895882
PubMed ID
24736600 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.