Skip header and navigation

Refine By

19 records – page 1 of 2.

Commentary on the paper "reliability and validity of the Swedish version of the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS)".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168251
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2006 Jun;13(2):133-4; author reply 134
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Ingvild Kjeken
Hanne Dagfinrud
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2006 Jun;13(2):133-4; author reply 134
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Fatigue - diagnosis
Humans
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: Scand J Occup Ther. 2005 Dec;12(4):170-8016457090
PubMed ID
16856470 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of a one week multidisciplinary inpatient self-management programme for patients with fibromyalgia: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120352
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:189
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Bente Hamnes
Petter Mowinckel
Ingvild Kjeken
Kåre B Hagen
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Lillehammer, Norway. bente.hamnes@revmatismesykehuset.no
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:189
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Fibromyalgia - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Pain - diagnosis - etiology
Pain Measurement
Patient care team
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Self Care
Self Efficacy
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - etiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Self-management programmes (SMP) are recommended for patients with fibromyalgia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effects of a one week multidisciplinary inpatient self-management programme on psychological distress, skills as a consumer of health services, self-efficacy, and functional and symptomatic consequences of fibromyalgia (FM).
A randomised controlled two-armed, assessor-blinded trial with three-week follow-up to evaluate SMP. Primary outcomes were the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20) and the Effective Musculoskeletal Consumer Scale (EC-17), while secondary outcomes included the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and Self-efficacy scales for pain, function and symptoms (ASES).
150 patients with FM were randomised to one week one SMP (n?=?75) or to a waiting list control group (n?=?75). Of these, 58 participants in the treatment group and 60 in the control group completed the study. At three weeks' follow up there was a significant difference in EC-17 (0-100) in favour of the treatment group (mean difference 4.26, 95 CI 0.8 to 7.7, p?=?0.02). There were no differences between the groups for any of the other outcomes.
This study shows that in patients with FM the SMP had no effect on psychological distress, functional and symptomatic consequences and self-efficacy, except for a small short-term effect on skills and behaviour that are important for managing and participating in health care (EC-17). Clinical Trials.gov Id: NCT01035125.
Clinical Trials.gov Id: NCT01035125.
Notes
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2000 Mar;43(3):561-710728749
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2007 May;66(5):571-8116916856
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2002 Oct -Nov;48(2):177-8712401421
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2007 Jun;34(6):1392-40017552066
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jan;66(1):182-817850944
Cites: Int J Clin Pract. 2008 Jan;62(1):115-2618039330
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2008 Apr;67(4):536-4117644548
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2008;69 Suppl 2:30-418537461
Cites: BMJ. 2008;337:a165518824488
Cites: Geriatr Nurs. 2009 Mar-Apr;30(2 Suppl):4-1019345857
Cites: Scand J Rheumatol. 2009 May-Jun;38(3):231-219165650
Cites: Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2009 Jun;106(23):383-9119623319
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2009;10:12419811630
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Dec 15;61(12):1650-619950317
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:2120113488
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2010 May;79(2):178-8419889508
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2010 Jun;69(6):955-6320448289
Cites: Musculoskeletal Care. 2011 Dec;9(4):200-1021774066
Cites: Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2011 Dec;41(3):319-3421665248
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2009 Sep;36(9):2087-9119738218
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1989 Jan;32(1):37-442912463
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 May 10;109(13):1391-42749623
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1989;355:103-122624128
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1990 Feb;33(2):160-722306288
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1991 May;18(5):728-331865419
Cites: WHO Reg Publ Eur Ser. 1992;44:11-311514969
Cites: Scand J Rheumatol. 1995;24(2):69-757747146
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 1995 Sep;26(1-3):139-447494713
Cites: Psychosom Med. 1999 Jul-Aug;61(4):576-8310443768
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Nov 17;292(19):2388-9515547167
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2005 Jun 17;27(12):703-916012063
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2005 Jun 17;27(12):711-2316012064
Cites: Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2005 Sep-Oct;23(5 Suppl 39):S154-6216273800
Cites: Curr Pharm Des. 2006;12(1):59-6616454725
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Sep;60(9):789-9216905724
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2001 Nov;45(2):111-811687324
PubMed ID
23013162 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of a structured goal planning and tailored follow-up programme in rehabilitation for patients with rheumatic diseases: protocol for a pragmatic, stepped-wedge cluster randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266104
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2014;15:153
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ingvild Kjeken
Gunnhild Berdal
Ingvild Bø
Turid Dager
Anne Dingsør
Jon Hagfors
Bente Hamnes
Siv G Eppeland
Elin Fjerstad
Petter Mowinckel
Merete Nielsen
Randi W Rørstad
Anne-Lene Sand-Svartrud
Bente Slungaard
Sigrid H Wigers
Kåre Birger Hagen
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2014;15:153
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare - methods
Cost of Illness
Goals
Humans
Life Style
Motivation
Multicenter Studies as Topic - methods
Norway
Patient Education as Topic
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - ethics - methods
Research Design
Rheumatic Diseases - economics - rehabilitation
Self Care
Self Efficacy
Single-Blind Method
Telephone
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Comprehensive rehabilitation, involving health professionals from various disciplines, is widely used as an adjunct to pharmacological and surgical treatment in people with rheumatic diseases. However, the evidence for the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of such interventions is limited, and the majority of those who receive rehabilitation are back to their initial health status six to 12 months after discharge.
To evaluate the goal attainment, health effects and cost-effectiveness of a new rehabilitation programme compared to current traditional rehabilitation programmes for people with rheumatic diseases, a stepped-wedge cluster randomized trial will be performed. Patients admitted for rehabilitation at six centres in the south-eastern part of Norway will be invited to participate. In the trial, six participating centres will switch from a control (current rehabilitation programme) to an intervention phase (the new rehabilitation programme) in a randomized order. Supported by recent research, the new programme will be a supplement to the existing programme at each centre, and will comprise four elements designed to enhance and support lifestyle changes introduced in the rehabilitation period: structured goal-planning, motivational interviewing, a self-help booklet and four follow-up telephone calls during the first five months following discharge. The primary outcome will be health-related quality of life and goal attainment, as measured by the Patient Generated Index directly before and after the rehabilitation stay, as well as after six and 12 months. Secondary outcomes will include self-reported pain, fatigue, a global assessment of disease activity and motivation for change (measured on 11-point numeric ratings scales), health-related quality of life as measured by the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) and utility assessed by the SF6D utility index.The main analysis will be on an intention to treat basis and will assess the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of the structured goal planning and tailored follow-up rehabilitation programme for patients with rheumatic diseases.
The findings will constitute an important contribution to more cost-effective- and evidence-based rehabilitation services for people with rheumatic diseases.
ISRCTN91433175.
Notes
Cites: Behav Cogn Psychother. 2009 Mar;37(2):129-4019364414
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1998 Nov;51(11):1069-769817124
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1999 Oct;80(10):1282-710527088
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2005 Feb;56(2):209-1115703351
Cites: Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2005 Sep;19(3):227-3116093413
Cites: Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2006 Oct;85(10):807-1316998427
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2006 Sep;20(9):739-5517005499
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2006;6:5417092344
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2007 May;16(4):705-1517268928
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2010 Jul;63(7):699-70419788953
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2010 Jun;69(6):955-6320448289
Cites: Am J Health Behav. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):750-6320604699
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2010 Oct;69(10):1762-720448285
Cites: Tob Control. 2010 Oct;19(5):410-620675688
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Nov 2;153(9):570-921041576
Cites: Int J Rheum Dis. 2010 Oct;13(4):324-3421199467
Cites: Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2011 May;23(3):259-6421346575
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2011 May;20(9-10):1236-4421492271
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2011 May;25(5):468-8221131335
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011;(5):CD00806321563163
Cites: Fam Pract. 2011 Oct;28(5):489-50421555339
Cites: Scand J Rheumatol. 2012 Feb;41(1):20-822106920
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(11):910-622066740
Cites: Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2012 Mar-Apr;30(2):30822325016
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2012 May;44(5):406-1322549648
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2013 Mar;45(3):260-723138412
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2013 May;52(5):924-3223335634
Cites: BMJ. 2000 May 20;320(7246):1385-810818031
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2001 Jun;15(3):229-3211386391
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003 Aug;35(8):1381-9512900694
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2003 Oct;71(5):843-6114516234
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2004 Jan 7;26(1):1-814660192
Cites: Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2004 Mar;16(2):153-614770103
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2004 May;53(2):147-5515140454
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 1987 Sep;53(3):563-712821217
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1988 Apr;31(4):471-93358810
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1989 Jan;32(1):37-442912463
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):473-831593914
Cites: Br J Addict. 1992 Jun;87(6):825-8; discussion 833-51525523
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1993 Feb;36(2):243-67679273
Cites: Med Care. 1994 Nov;32(11):1109-267967852
Cites: Br J Rheumatol. 1996 May;35(5):475-828646440
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2007 Jun;34(6):1241-717516624
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2007 Sep;46(9):1397-40417586864
Cites: Pharm World Sci. 2008 Jan;30(1):17-2317557211
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Mar 15;59(3):325-3118311770
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2008 May;40(5):340-618461258
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2009 Apr;23(4):321-3319293291
Cites: Eur J Phys Rehabil Med. 2009 Jun;45(2):205-819532108
PubMed ID
24886382 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hand, hip and knee osteoarthritis in a Norwegian population-based study--the MUST protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112482
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013;14:201
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Nina Østerås
May Arna Risberg
Tore K Kvien
Lars Engebretsen
Lars Nordsletten
Dag Bruusgaard
Unni-Berit Schjervheim
Ida K Haugen
Hilde Berner Hammer
Sella Provan
Britt Elin Øiestad
Anne Grete Semb
Silvia Rollefstad
Kåre Birger Hagen
Till Uhlig
Barbara Slatkowsky-Christensen
Ingvild Kjeken
Gunnar Flugsrud
Margreth Grotle
Sølve Sesseng
Hanne Edvardsen
Bård Natvig
Author Affiliation
National Resource, Center for rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. nina.osteras@medisin.uio.no
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013;14:201
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Clinical Protocols
Female
Hand Joints - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoarthritis - epidemiology - pathology
Osteoarthritis, Hip - epidemiology - pathology
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - pathology
Postal Service
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Design
Abstract
Knowledge about the prevalence and consequences of osteoarthritis (OA) in the Norwegian population is limited. This study has been designed to gain a greater understanding of musculoskeletal pain in the general population with a focus on clinically and radiologically confirmed OA, as well as risk factors, consequences, and management of OA.
The Musculoskeletal pain in Ullensaker STudy (MUST) has been designed as an observational study comprising a population-based postal survey and a comprehensive clinical examination of a sub-sample with self-reported OA (MUST OA cohort). All inhabitants in Ullensaker municipality, Norway, aged 40 to 79 years receive the initial population-based postal survey questionnaire with questions about life style, general health, musculoskeletal pain, self-reported OA, comorbidities, health care utilisation, medication use, and functional ability. Participants who self-report OA in their hip, knee and/or hand joints are asked to attend a comprehensive clinical examination at Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, including a comprehensive medical examination, performance-based functional tests, different imaging modalities, cardiovascular assessment, blood and urine samples, and a number of patient-reported questionnaires including five OA disease specific instruments. Data will be merged with six national data registries. A subsample of those who receive the questionnaire has previously participated in postal surveys conducted in 1990, 1994, and 2004 with data on musculoskeletal pain and functional ability in addition to demographic characteristics and a number of health related factors. This subsample constitutes a population based cohort with 20 years follow-up.
This protocol describes the design of an observational population-based study that will involve the collection of data from a postal survey on musculoskeletal pain, and a comprehensive clinical examination on those with self-reported hand, hip and/or knee OA. These data, in addition to data from national registries, will provide unique insights into clinically and radiologically confirmed OA with respect to risk factors, consequences, and management.
Notes
Cites: Res Q Exerc Sport. 1999 Jun;70(2):113-910380242
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 1957 Dec;16(4):494-50213498604
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Jan;64(1):70-415608302
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 May;64(5):669-8115471891
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2005 Aug;32(8):1432-916078316
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Nov;64(11):1539-4116107512
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2006 Mar;54(3):802-716508955
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2006 Apr 15;55(2):241-716583414
Cites: Epidemiology. 2006 May;17(3):252-416617271
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2006 Apr;14(4):303-2216697937
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2006 Nov;27(21):2588-60517000623
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2007 Jan;34(1):172-8017216685
Cites: Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2007 Mar;19(2):179-8317278935
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2007 Mar;15(3):357-6117097316
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2007 Mar;66(3):377-8817046965
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2007;15 Suppl A:A1-5617320422
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2007 Oct;34(10):2099-10517722223
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Jul;65(7):1043-5123401461
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2006 May;30(5):385-9316627126
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 Mar 1;53(3):315-2210760643
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2000 Sep;18(3):159-6411097101
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2001 May;44(5):1105-1311352242
Cites: Hypertension. 2001 Oct;38(4):932-711641312
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 Jul 1;166(1):111-712091180
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2002 Nov;10(11):855-6212435330
Cites: Scand J Rheumatol. 2003;32(1):46-5112635946
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Jun 15;49(3):453-412794803
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003 Aug;35(8):1381-9512900694
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Oct 15;49(5):626-3214558047
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2003 Dec;62(12):1145-5514644851
Cites: Eur Radiol. 2004 Sep;14(9):1568-7315150666
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 1973 Sep;32(5):413-84751776
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1985 Sep;(198):43-94028566
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1986 Aug;29(8):1039-493741515
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1989;42(5):449-572732773
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1990 Nov;33(11):1601-102242058
Cites: Med Care. 1990 Dec;28(12):1111-262250496
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2009 Apr;36(4):809-1519286855
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2009 May;68(5):611-919366893
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2009 Sep;68(9):1453-6018765429
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2009 Nov;68(11):1696-70019033292
Cites: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2009 Dec;39(12):845-920032559
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2010 Mar;69(3):585-720124359
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2010 Apr;18(4):476-9920170770
Cites: BMJ. 2011;342:d116521385807
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2011 Jun;70(6):1033-821436160
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2008 Apr;35(4):677-8418278832
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2008 May;67(5):651-517704062
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jan;36(1):52-6118426785
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2008 Jul;16(7):846-5018226557
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Jul 9;300(2):197-20818612117
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:14518611250
Cites: Pain. 2008 Aug 15;138(1):41-618077092
Cites: BMJ. 2008;337:a95718703659
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2008 Sep;89(9):1830-4518760171
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2008 Oct;67(10):1406-1118077540
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(4):CD00437618843657
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2008 Dec;58(557):839-4319068156
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Jan 15;61(1):92-919116973
Cites: Pain. 2009 Jan;141(1-2):25-3018977088
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Apr;64(4):465-7422563589
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2012 Jun;71(6):899-90422121126
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2012 Jun;18(3):534-4121210900
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2012 Dec;20(12):1568-7322975023
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2013 Jan;72(1):51-622523427
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Dec 15;380(9859):2163-9623245607
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e5304423308135
Cites: Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 2013 Feb;39(1):67-10523312411
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2013 Mar;72(3):401-522679305
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2011 May;19(5):478-8221396464
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Jun 18;377(9783):2115-2621684382
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2011 Jul;19(7):809-1521524707
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2011 Sep;70(9):1581-621622766
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2011 Nov;70(11):1995-821784724
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2011 Oct;38(10):2230-721807776
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2011 Nov;19(11):1270-8521907813
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2011 Nov;63(11):3372-8221792835
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Jan;64(1):38-4522213723
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Feb;44(2):266-7221796052
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2012 Mar;71(3):345-5021989543
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13:2022340303
Cites: Health Policy. 1990 Dec;16(3):199-20810109801
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1991 May;34(5):505-142025304
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1991 Oct;18(10):1552-71837315
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):473-831593914
Cites: Rev Rhum Engl Ed. 1995 Jun;62(6 Suppl 1):43S-53S7583182
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1997 Jan;24(1):43-89002009
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1997 Apr;24(4):719-259101508
Cites: Semin Arthritis Rheum. 1997 Apr;26(5):771-99144852
Cites: Scand J Rheumatol. 1997;26(6):412-89433400
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 1998 Mar;6(2):87-939692063
Cites: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 1998 Aug;28(2):88-969699158
Cites: J Hand Surg Am. 1998 Jul;23(4):575-879708370
PubMed ID
23826721 View in PubMed
Less detail

How to develop patient-centered research: some perspectives based on surveys among people with rheumatic diseases in Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145762
Source
Phys Ther. 2010 Mar;90(3):450-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Ingvild Kjeken
Connie Ziegler
Jack Skrolsvik
Jan Bagge
Geir Smedslund
Anne Tøvik
Hanne S Dagfinrud
Ingemar F Petersson
Kåre Birger Hagen
Author Affiliation
National Resource Centre for Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ingvild.kjeken@diakonsyk.no
Source
Phys Ther. 2010 Mar;90(3):450-60
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis - therapy
Attitude to Health
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Congresses as topic
Consumer Participation
Employment
Health Priorities
Humans
Information Dissemination
Needs Assessment
Patient Selection
Patient-Centered Care
Questionnaires
Scandinavia
Abstract
Patient-centered research addresses the research agenda of patients and captures aspects of health and functioning that they consider important. Yet, those who live with a disease or condition have limited influence when it comes to setting the research agenda, and we know little about how they experience being participants in research studies. Furthermore, knowledge is limited concerning factors enhancing or hindering patients' participation in trials and the format that people with rheumatic diseases and their families prefer for dissemination of the results from clinical research. This perspective article describes the research priorities of people with rheumatic diseases in Scandinavia, their experiences and attitudes concerning participation in research projects, and which format for research information they prefer. Based on results from 3 surveys organized by the Scandinavian Rheumatism Associations and on related research literature, the possible implications for future research also are discussed.
PubMed ID
20110341 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of functional impairment in ankylosing spondylitis: impairment, activity limitation, and participation restrictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175956
Source
J Rheumatol. 2005 Mar;32(3):516-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Hanne Dagfinrud
Ingvild Kjeken
Petter Mowinckel
Kaare B Hagen
Tore K Kvien
Author Affiliation
Section for Health Science, University of Oslo, PO Box 1153, Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. h.s.dagfinrud@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Rheumatol. 2005 Mar;32(3):516-23
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Range of Motion, Articular
Sex Factors
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - pathology - physiopathology
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
To describe difficulties in everyday activities related to impaired function in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and to examine possible sex differences in the impact of the disease. In addition, to examine the relationships between measures of personal characteristics, impairment, and activity/participation levels within the framework of the International Classification of Functioning (ICF).
A total of 152 patients with AS took part in a clinical examination including anthropometric measures, blood samples, and self-reported disease related measures. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) interviews were performed to describe and measure activity limitations and participation restrictions perceived by the patient during the last year. The study variables were categorized and analyzed according to the levels of the ICF model using bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches.
The mean age of patients was 47 (SD 13) years, 58% were men, and the mean disease duration was 15 (SD 12) years. The problems most frequently reported in COPM interviews were "interrupted sleeping," "turn head when driving," "carry groceries," and "having energy for social activities." Women reported higher level of disease activity and more physical limitations than men. Disease activity and reduced mobility (impairment variables) seemed to result in more activity/participation restrictions in female than in male patients. The impairment variables explained only one-third of the activity and participation restrictions perceived by patients.
Activity limitations and participation restrictions reported by patients were only partly explained by the impairment variables. Further research should identify social, structural, and attitudinal barriers influencing activity and participation in patients with AS.
PubMed ID
15742446 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Interdisciplinary documentation of the course of rehabilitation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158781
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Feb 14;128(4):468-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2008

Multidisciplinary and multifaceted outpatient management of patients with osteoarthritis: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139631
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:253
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Rikke Helene Moe
Till Uhlig
Ingvild Kjeken
Kåre Birger Hagen
Tore Kristian Kvien
Margreth Grotle
Author Affiliation
National Resource Centre for Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. rikke.moe@diakonsyk.no
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:253
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clinical Protocols - standards
Combined Modality Therapy - methods - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Osteoarthritis - rehabilitation
Outpatients
Pain Clinics - standards
Patient Care Team - standards
Single-Blind Method
Abstract
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent joint disorder with a need for efficient and evidence-based management strategies.
The primary purpose of this study is to compare the effects of a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic, including a brief group-based educational programme, with a traditional individual outpatient clinic for patients with hip, knee, hand or generalized OA. A secondary purpose is to investigate the effects of a telephone follow-up call.
This is a pragmatic randomised single-blind controlled study with a total of 400 patients with hip, knee, hand or generalized OA between 40 and 80 years referred to an outpatient rheumatology hospital clinic. The randomisation is stratified according to the diagnostic subgroups. The experimental group is exposed to a multidisciplinary and multifaceted intervention, including a 3.5 hour group-based patient education programme about OA in addition to individual consultations with members of a multidisciplinary team. The control intervention is based on regular care with an individual outpatient consultation with a rheumatologist (treatment as usual). Primary outcomes are patient satisfaction measured at 4 months and cost-effectiveness measured at 12 months. Secondary outcomes are pain and global disease activity measured on a numeric rating scales (NRS), generic and disease specific functioning and disability using Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index 3 (WOMAC), the Australian/Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index (AUSCAN), and a patient-generated measure of disability (Patient-Specific Functional scale, PSFS). Global perceived effect of change in health status during the study period is also reported. At 4-month follow-up, patients in both groups will be randomly allocated to a 10-minute telephone call or no follow-up ("treatment as usual"). After additional 8 months (12-month follow-up) the four groups will be compared in a secondary analysis with regard to health outcomes and health care costs.
This trial will provide results on how multidisciplinary and multifaceted management of patients with OA affects health outcomes and health care costs.
Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN25778426.
Notes
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2002 Nov;10(11):855-6212435330
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2008 Oct;67(10):1406-1118077540
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2003 Dec;62(12):1145-5514644851
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 Aug 9-23;164(15):1641-915302634
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Oct 15;51(5):709-1515478169
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1989 Jan;32(1):37-442912463
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1988 Dec;15(12):1833-403068365
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1989;42(5):449-572732773
Cites: Health Policy. 1990 Dec;16(3):199-20810109801
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1991 Oct;18(10):1552-71837315
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):473-831593914
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1997 Apr;24(4):719-259101508
Cites: Semin Arthritis Rheum. 1997 Apr;26(5):771-99144852
Cites: Phys Ther. 1997 Aug;77(8):820-99256870
Cites: Curr Opin Rheumatol. 1998 Mar;10(2):136-409567209
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 1998 Jun;69(3):219-209703390
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1999 Jul;26(7):1474-8010405932
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 May;64(5):669-8115471891
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2005 Jun;13(6):455-6215922179
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2005 Jul;13(7):561-715896986
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Nov;64(11):1633-815829571
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2006 Feb;20(1):3-2516483904
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2007 Mar;66(3):377-8817046965
Cites: Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2007 Sep;15(9):981-100017719803
Cites: Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2003 Mar;15(2):156-912598805
PubMed ID
21040556 View in PubMed
Less detail

Norwegian version of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure in patients with hand osteoarthritis: validity, responsiveness, and feasibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13784
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Oct 15;51(5):709-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2004
Author
Ingvild Kjeken
Barbara Slatkowsky-Christensen
Tore K Kvien
Till Uhlig
Author Affiliation
Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ingvild.kjeken@nrrk.no
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Oct 15;51(5):709-15
Date
Oct-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Feasibility Studies
Female
Hand
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Osteoarthritis - diagnosis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To test the Norwegian version of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) for validity, responsiveness, and feasibility in patients with hand osteoarthritis. METHODS: Seventy-nine patients completed a COPM interview and several self-reported health status questionnaires, including Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales 2, modified Health Assessment Questionnaire; Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and the Australian/Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index. Rescoring of the same instruments was performed 4 months later, after an intervention. RESULTS: The COPM detected a great variability of occupational performance problems. The hypotheses for testing validity were confirmed. Mean COPM change was 1.51 (P
PubMed ID
15478169 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patient-reported quality of care for osteoarthritis: development and testing of the osteoarthritis quality indicator questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116406
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Jul;65(7):1043-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Nina Østerås
Andrew Garratt
Margreth Grotle
Bård Natvig
Ingvild Kjeken
Tore K Kvien
Kåre B Hagen
Author Affiliation
National Resource Center for Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, N-0319 Oslo, Norway. nina.osteras@medisin.uio.no
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Jul;65(7):1043-51
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Observer Variation
Office Visits
Osteoarthritis - diagnosis - therapy
Patient Education as Topic
Patients
Quality Improvement
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
To develop and test a new instrument for patient self-reported quality of osteoarthritis (OA) care, and to provide quality indicator (QI) pass rates in a Norwegian OA cohort.
The OsteoArthritis Quality Indicator (OA-QI) questionnaire was developed using published QIs, expert panels, and patient interviews. Self-reported data were collected from 359 persons in a Norwegian OA cohort, and test-retest reliability and validity were assessed. Separate QI pass rates and summary QI pass rates were calculated.
The 17-item questionnaire includes QIs related to patient education and information, regular provider assessments, referrals, and pharmacologic treatment. The patient self-reported questionnaire was completed with minimal respondent burden. Support for content validity was confirmed by 2 patient research partners and 2 expert panels. All 10 predefined hypotheses relating to construct validity were confirmed. Test-retest kappa coefficients ranged from 0.20-0.80 and the percentage of exact agreement ranged from 62-90%. The mean pass rate for individual QIs was 31% (range 5-49%). The median summary QI pass rate was 27% (interquartile range 12-50%), with lower summary pass rates for nonpharmacologic compared to pharmacologic treatments.
To our knowledge, this is the first instrument developed to measure patient-reported QI pass rates for OA care. This study indicates that the OA-QI questionnaire is acceptable to persons with OA, and its short format makes it suitable for population surveys. The low patient self-reported QI pass rates in this study suggest a potential for quality improvement in OA care.
PubMed ID
23401461 View in PubMed
Less detail

19 records – page 1 of 2.