Skip header and navigation

Refine By

13 records – page 1 of 2.

Colon cancer trends in Norway and Denmark by socio-economic group: A cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271109
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Dec;43(8):890-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Elsebeth Lynge
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Inger Kristin Larsen
Kristina Kjærheim
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Dec;43(8):890-8
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Norway has experienced an unprecedented rapid and so far unexplained increase in colon cancer incidence. Norwegian rates passed Danish rates for men in 1985 and for women in 1990. This study aimed to unravel clues to the development in colon cancer incidence by investigating changes over time in incidence by socio-economic group.
Persons participating in the 1970 censuses in Norway and Denmark were aged 55-75 years in 1971-1980 (called pre-crossing period) and in 1991-2000 (called post-crossing period), respectively. Country, sex, age and socio-economic group-specific colon cancer incidence rates. Percent change in the average rate from the pre- to the post-crossing period.
In the pre-crossing period, Norwegian male managers/administrators had the highest colon cancer incidence, but the largest increase in incidence from the pre-to the post-crossing period was seen for unskilled workers, skilled workers and farmers. The rate for unskilled workers almost doubled and in the post-crossing period this rate had bypassed that of managers/administrators. A similar development was seen for Norwegian women and was less dramatic in Denmark.
The change in the risk of manual workers has been the driving force behind the dramatic increase in the Norwegian incidence of colon cancer. This development resulted in a reversal of the socio-economic gradient from the classic European pattern with the highest incidence in the upper socio-economic groups to an American pattern with the highest incidence in the lower socio-economic groups. This 'Americanization' of the disease pattern followed the rapid growth in the Norwegian gross domestic product.
PubMed ID
26355120 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of cancer stage distribution in the immigrant and host populations of Norway, 1990-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285521
Source
Int J Cancer. 2017 Jul 01;141(1):52-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-01-2017
Author
Håvard Thøgersen
Bjørn Møller
Trude Eid Robsahm
Stein Aaserud
Ronnie Babigumira
Inger Kristin Larsen
Source
Int J Cancer. 2017 Jul 01;141(1):52-61
Date
Jul-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa South of the Sahara - epidemiology
Aged
Asia - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Cohort Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants
Epidemiological Monitoring
Far East - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
Cancer stage at diagnosis is the most important prognostic factor for survival. We conducted a nationwide, population-based cohort study to investigate cancer stage distribution in immigrants compared to the host population of Norway. All patients recorded in the Cancer Registry of Norway in 1990-2014 were included (17,709 immigrants and 431,936 Norwegians). Individual level sociodemographic data was obtained from Statistics Norway. Ordered logistic regression was used to estimate if immigrants were diagnosed with cancer at a more advanced stage than Norwegians. Seven cancer sites were analyzed (breast, cervix, colorectal, liver, lung and trachea, prostate and stomach). With exception of breast cancer, we did not observe a clear pattern of more advanced cancer stage distribution in immigrants compared to Norwegians. Odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals for being diagnosed with a more advanced stage of breast cancer for non-Western immigrant groups compared to Norwegians were: Eastern Europe: 1.41 (1.20-1.65), Middle East: 1.58 (1.19-2.10), sub-Saharan Africa: 1.44 (0.99-2.08), South Asia: 1.40 (1.07-1.83) and East Asia: 0.90 (0.72-1.13). Sub-analyses showed that late detection of breast cancer in young non-Western immigrants might be of particular concern. Young (
PubMed ID
28369751 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of data from the Norwegian Patient Register and the Cancer Registry of Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123230
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Jun 12;132(11):1336-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-2012
Author
Inger Johanne Bakken
Stein Olav Gystad
Øyvind Olav Schjøtt Christensen
Unn Elisabeth Huse
Siri Larønningen
Jan Nygård
Lena Holmstrøm
Tom Børge Johannesen
Bjørn Møller
Inger Kristin Larsen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Directorate of Health, Norwegian Patient Register, Trondheim, Norway. inger.johannebakken@helsedirektoratet.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Jun 12;132(11):1336-40
Date
Jun-12-2012
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Registries - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The regulations of the Norwegian Patient Register (NPR) and the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN) allow linkage of the registries for evaluation of completeness and validity of data.
Data on patients registered as having C18 (colon cancer), C19-C21 (cancer of the rectum, rectosigmoid junction or anus), C33-C34 (cancer of the lungs or trachea), C50 (breast cancer), C61 (prostate cancer) or C66-C68 (cancer of the bladder, ureter or urethra) were obtained from NPR 2008 and compared with data from CRN.
81 % of patients registered in NPR as having colon cancer were registered with the same diagnosis in CRN. Corresponding figures were 94 % for breast cancer (women), 97 % for prostate cancer, 82 % for cancer of the rectum, rectosigmoid junction or anus, 93 % for urinary tract cancer and 90 % for cancer of the lungs or trachea. In cases where NPR codes and CRN diagnoses did not match, a related diagnosis was often registered in the CRN.
The agreement between the data in NPR and CRN is relatively good for the diagnoses included in the study. The NPR codes are less precise for colon and rectal cancer than for the other major types of cancer. Regular exchange of data between the registries will further improve the quality of the data.
PubMed ID
22717858 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does cancer in a child affect parents' employment and earnings? A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140985
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2011 Jun;35(3):298-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Astri Syse
Inger Kristin Larsen
Steinar Tretli
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. astri.syse@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2011 Jun;35(3):298-305
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - economics - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Parents
Registries
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Cancer in a child may adversely affect parents' work opportunities due to enlarged care burdens and/or altered priorities. Few studies exist, and possible effects on parental employment and earnings were therefore explored.
Data on the entire Norwegian population aged 27-65 with children under the age of 20 in 1990-2002 (N=1.2 million) was retrieved from national registries. Employment rates for parents of 3263 children with cancer were compared to those of parents with children without cancer by means of logistic regression models. Log-linear regression models were used to explore childhood cancer's effect on parental earnings for the large majority of parents who remained employed.
Cancer in a child was in general not associated with a reduced risk of employment, although some exceptions exist among both mothers and fathers. For employed mothers, CNS cancers, germinal cell cancers, and unspecified leukemia were associated with significant reductions in earnings (10%, 21%, and 60%, respectively). Reductions were particularly pronounced for mothers with a young and alive child, and became more pronounced with time elapsed from diagnosis. Fathers' earnings were not affected significantly.
Parents' employment is not adversely affected by a child's cancer in Norway. Earnings are reduced in certain instances, but the overall effects are minor. Generous welfare options and flexible labor markets typical for Nordic welfare states may account for this. In line with traditional caregiving responsibilities, reductions in earnings were most pronounced for mothers.
PubMed ID
20822964 View in PubMed
Less detail

How Many Deaths from Colorectal Cancer Can Be Prevented by 2030? A Scenario-Based Quantification of Risk Factor Modification, Screening, and Treatment in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291607
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2017 Sep; 26(9):1420-1426
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Katrine Damgaard Skyrud
Tor Åge Myklebust
Freddie Bray
Morten Tandberg Eriksen
Thomas de Lange
Inger Kristin Larsen
Bjørn Møller
Author Affiliation
Department of Registration, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Majorstuen, Oslo, Norway. Katrine.Damgaard.Skyrud@kreftregisteret.no.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2017 Sep; 26(9):1420-1426
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Female
History, 21st Century
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Background: Colorectal cancer mortality can be reduced through risk factor modification (adherence to lifestyle recommendations), screening, and improved treatment. This study estimated the potential of these three strategies to modify colorectal cancer mortality rates in Norway.Methods: The potential reduction in colorectal cancer mortality due to risk factor modification was estimated using the software Prevent, assuming that 50% of the population in Norway-who do not adhere to the various recommendations concerning prevention of smoking, physical activity, body weight, and intake of alcohol, red/processed meat, and fiber-started to follow the recommendations. The impact of screening was quantified assuming implementation of national flexible sigmoidoscopy screening with 50% attendance. The reduction in colorectal cancer mortality due to improved treatment was calculated assuming that 50% of the linear (positive) trend in colorectal cancer survival would continue to persist in future years.Results: Risk factor modification would decrease colorectal cancer mortality by 11% (corresponding to 227 prevented deaths: 142 men, 85 women) by 2030. Screening and improved treatment in Norway would reduce colorectal cancer mortality by 7% (149 prevented deaths) and 12% (268 prevented deaths), respectively, by 2030. Overall, the combined effect of all three strategies would reduce colorectal cancer mortality by 27% (604 prevented deaths) by 2030.Conclusions: Risk factor modification, screening, and treatment all have considerable potential to reduce colorectal cancer mortality by 2030, with the largest potential reduction observed for improved treatment and risk factor modification.Impact: The estimation of these health impact measures provides useful information that can be applied in public health decision-making. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1420-6. ©2017 AACR.
PubMed ID
28626069 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lifestyle changes at middle age and mortality: a population-based prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289552
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017 01; 71(1):59-66
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2017
Author
Paula Berstad
Edoardo Botteri
Inger Kristin Larsen
Magnus Løberg
Mette Kalager
Øyvind Holme
Michael Bretthauer
Geir Hoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Colorectal Cancer Screening, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017 01; 71(1):59-66
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Colonoscopy
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The effect of modifying lifestyle at middle age on mortality has been sparsely examined.
Men and women aged 50-54 years randomised to the control group (no intervention) in the population-based Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention trial were asked to fill in lifestyle questionnaires in 2001 and 2004. Lifestyle scores were estimated ranging from 0 (poorest) to 4 (best) based on health recommendations (non-smoking, daily physical activity, body mass index
PubMed ID
27312250 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lifestyle changes at middle age and mortality: a population-based prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289710
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017 01; 71(1):59-66
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2017
Author
Paula Berstad
Edoardo Botteri
Inger Kristin Larsen
Magnus Løberg
Mette Kalager
Øyvind Holme
Michael Bretthauer
Geir Hoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Colorectal Cancer Screening, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017 01; 71(1):59-66
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Colonoscopy
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The effect of modifying lifestyle at middle age on mortality has been sparsely examined.
Men and women aged 50-54 years randomised to the control group (no intervention) in the population-based Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention trial were asked to fill in lifestyle questionnaires in 2001 and 2004. Lifestyle scores were estimated ranging from 0 (poorest) to 4 (best) based on health recommendations (non-smoking, daily physical activity, body mass index
PubMed ID
27312250 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-term lifestyle changes after colorectal cancer screening: randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266521
Source
Gut. 2015 Aug;64(8):1268-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Paula Berstad
Magnus Løberg
Inger Kristin Larsen
Mette Kalager
Øyvind Holme
Edoardo Botteri
Michael Bretthauer
Geir Hoff
Source
Gut. 2015 Aug;64(8):1268-76
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Sigmoidoscopy - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
There is uncertainty whether cancer screening affects participant incentives for favourable lifestyle. The present study investigates long-term effects of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening on lifestyle changes.
In 1999-2001, men and women drawn from the population registry were randomised to screening for CRC by flexible sigmoidoscopy ('invited-to-screening' arm) or to no-screening (control arm) in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention trial. A subgroup of 3043 individuals in the 'invited-to-screening' and 2819 in the control arm, aged 50-55 years, randomised during 2001 had their lifestyle assessed by a questionnaire at inclusion and after 11 years (42% of cohort). The outcome was 11-year changes in lifestyle factors (body weight, smoking status, physical exercise, selected dietary habits) and in total lifestyle score (0-4 points, translating to the number of lifestyle recommendations adhered to). We compared outcomes in the two randomisation arms and attendees with positive versus negative findings.
Total lifestyle scores improved in both arms. The improvement was smaller in the 'invited-to-screening' arm (score 1.43 at inclusion; 1.58 after 11 years) compared with the control arm (score 1.49 at inclusion; 1.67 after 11 years); adjusted difference -0.05 (95% CI -0.09 to -0.01; p=0.03). The change in the score was less favourable in screening attendees with a positive compared with negative screening result; adjusted difference -0.16 (95% CI -0.25 to -0.08; p
PubMed ID
25183203 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lung cancer – changes in incidence by gender, age and county of residence 1984-2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271970
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Nov 3;135(20):1844-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-3-2015
Author
Tom Kristian Grimsrud
Hans Kristian Skaug
Inger Kristin Larsen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Nov 3;135(20):1844-9
Date
Nov-3-2015
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
The Cancer Registry of Norway has reported a decline in age-standardised lung cancer rates for men and an unconfirmed levelling-off in the rate for women. This study describes the development in trends according to gender and age, nationwide as well as by county.
Data on lung cancer from the Cancer Registry of Norway and the NORDCAN website are presented as age-specific and age-standardised rates by gender and place of residence, with a main emphasis on the period 1984-2013.
Out of 62,937 Norwegian lung cancer patients (1984-2013), altogether 63% were men. Nationally there was a decline in the rate for middle-aged men (50-69 years), but only a levelling-off in the oldest age group (= 70 years). For women, the rates increased in both age groups, most markedly in the oldest one. The rates for older men in the Agder, Vestfold and Finnmark counties have remained above the national average for a prolonged period, and there are only modest signs of a decline among the middle-aged. Oslo is a clear exception, with a clear and sustained decline among men in both age groups. Vest-Agder county had the highest rate for women during the last five-year period, while the rates in Oslo are now at the national average. The national rates for middle-aged women and middle-aged men are converging, intersecting each other in Akershus county.
The large differences between genders, age groups, counties and nations in terms of trends in lung cancer indicate that through preventive efforts, we might have achieved much more in a shorter time.
Notes
Erratum In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Nov 17;135(21):192426577315
Erratum In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Dec 15;135(23-24):213126674027
PubMed ID
26534811 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk of breast cancer following fertility treatment--a registry based cohort study of parous women in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260795
Source
Int J Cancer. 2015 Mar 1;136(5):1140-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2015
Author
Marte Myhre Reigstad
Inger Kristin Larsen
Tor Åge Myklebust
Trude Eid Robsahm
Nan Birgitte Oldereid
Anne Katerine Omland
Siri Vangen
Louise Annette Brinton
Ritsa Storeng
Source
Int J Cancer. 2015 Mar 1;136(5):1140-8
Date
Mar-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infertility, Female - complications - therapy
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Registries
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - adverse effects
Risk factors
Abstract
Despite increasing numbers of women availing themselves of assisted reproductive technology (ART), effects on cancer risk remain unresolved. Given hormonal exposures, breast cancer risk is of particular concern. The aim of this study is to investigate breast cancer risk amongst women giving birth following ART as compared to that amongst women who gave birth without ART. Data on all women who gave birth in Norway with or without ART, between 1984 and 2010 were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN). 808,834 women eligible for study were linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. Cox proportional models computed hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of breast cancer between the two groups, adjusting for age, parity, age at first birth, calendar period and region of residence. In total, 8,037 women were diagnosed with breast cancer during the study period, 138 ART women and 7,899 unexposed. Total follow-up time was 12,401,121 person-years (median 16.0); median age at entry was 32.5 years (range 18.6-49.9) for ART women and 26.3 (range 10.5-54.6) for unexposed. Women exposed to ART had an elevated risk of breast cancer (adjusted HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.01-1.42). Subgroup analyses gave an HR of 1.30 (95% CI 1.07-1.57) for women treated with IVF and 1.35 (95 % CI 1.07-1.71) for women with follow-up >10 years, compared with controls. Our findings of increased risk in the study population warrant continued monitoring of women treated with ART as this population advances into more typical cancer age ranges.
Notes
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2010 Nov;124(1):13-2620809361
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2011 Jan;26(1):253-821088017
Cites: Reprod Biomed Online. 2011 Jun;22(7):673-8521498121
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2011 Sep 1;129(5):1225-3621387311
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2012 Apr;27(4):1149-5522343550
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2012 May 1;156(9):635-4822547473
Cites: Semin Reprod Med. 2012 Apr;30(2):131-4522549713
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2012 Aug;98(2):334-4022633651
Cites: Gynecol Endocrinol. 2012 Oct;28(10):809-1422475084
Cites: Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2013 Jan;23(1):16-2423211423
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2012;12:11523095718
Cites: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther. 2013 Feb;13(2):149-5723406556
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2013 Apr;99(5):1189-9623375197
Cites: Hum Reprod Update. 2013 Jul-Aug;19(4):354-6523459992
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2013 Sep;28(9):2318-3123842560
Cites: Lancet. 1999 Nov 6;354(9190):1586-9010560672
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2002 Feb;77(2):324-711821091
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2002 May;17(5):1399-40311980771
Cites: Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2003 Jan-Feb;13(1):23-712631215
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2004 Sep;19(9):2005-1315217997
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2004 Oct;19(10):2216-2115271872
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Nov 15;136(10):1184-2031476141
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 Sep 22;331(12):771-68065405
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 Sep 22;331(12):805-67772101
Cites: Fertil Steril. 1995 Jan;63(1):77-867805928
Cites: Hum Reprod. 1995 Oct;10(10):2534-408567765
Cites: Fertil Steril. 1998 Jul;70(1):30-49660416
Cites: Stat Med. 1998 Sep 15;17(17):1973-889777690
Cites: J Cell Mol Med. 2005 Jan-Mar;9(1):208-2115784178
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2007 Feb;22(2):421-617071821
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Jul;16(7):1400-717585058
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2007;22(7):447-5517594526
Cites: Psychooncology. 2007 Oct;16(10):920-717279494
Cites: Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2008 Apr;66(1):65-7417949989
Cites: Ann Surg Oncol. 2008 Apr;15(4):1048-5518214616
Cites: Breast J. 2008 Nov-Dec;14(6):517-2219000041
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Jan;200(1):72.e1-719121659
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2009 May;45(7):1218-3119091545
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2009 Nov;24(11):2683-719801627
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(10):1083-919657758
PubMed ID
25042052 View in PubMed
Less detail

13 records – page 1 of 2.