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Acupuncture reduces crying in infants with infantile colic: a randomised, controlled, blind clinical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139981
Source
Acupunct Med. 2010 Dec;28(4):174-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Kajsa Landgren
Nina Kvorning
Inger Hallström
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Kajsa.Landgren@med.lu.se
Source
Acupunct Med. 2010 Dec;28(4):174-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Points
Acupuncture Therapy - methods
Colic - therapy
Crying
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant Care - methods
Infant, Newborn
Male
Single-Blind Method
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To investigate whether acupuncture reduces the duration and intensity of crying in infants with colic. Patients and methods 90 otherwise healthy infants, 2-8 weeks old, with infantile colic were randomised in this controlled blind study. 81 completed a structured programme consisting of six visits during 3 weeks to an acupuncture clinic in Sweden. Parents blinded to the allocation of their children met a blinded nurse. The infant was subsequently given to another nurse in a separate room, who handled all infants similarly except that infants allocated to receive acupuncture were given minimal, standardised acupuncture for 2 s in LI4.
There was a difference (p=0.034) favouring the acupuncture group in the time which passed from inclusion until the infant no longer met the criteria for colic. The duration of fussing was lower in the acupuncture group the first (74 vs 129 min; p=0.029) and second week (71 vs 102 min; p=0.047) as well as the duration of colicky crying in the second intervention week (9 vs 13 min; p=0.046) was lower in the acupuncture group. The total duration of fussing, crying and colicky crying (TC) was lower in the acupuncture group during the first (193 vs 225 min; p=0.025) and the second intervention week (164 vs 188 min; p=0.016). The relative difference from baseline throughout the intervention weeks showed differences between groups for fussing in the first week (22 vs 6 min; p=0.028), for colicky crying in the second week (92 vs 73 min; p=0.041) and for TC in the second week (44 vs 29 min; p=0.024), demonstrating favour towards the acupuncture group.
Minimal acupuncture shortened the duration and reduced the intensity of crying in infants with colic. Further research using different acupuncture points, needle techniques and intervals between treatments is required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20959312 View in PubMed
Less detail

An everyday struggle-Swedish families' lived experiences during a child's cancer treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148338
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Oct;24(5):423-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Maria Björk
Thomas Wiebe
Inger Hallström
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. maria.bjork@med.lu.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Oct;24(5):423-32
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Cost of Illness
Family - psychology
Family Health
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Pediatric Nursing
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim was to elucidate families' lived experience during a child's cancer treatment. Interviews were conducted with members of 11 affected families. A hermeneutical phenomenological approach was chosen. "Focus on the ill child-An everyday struggle" emerged as an essential theme. The families' lived experience of daily life was described as "feeling drained," "disrupting family life," "feeling locked up and isolated," "retaining normality," "becoming experts," and "changing perspectives." The result indicates that life during a child's cancer treatment is a taxing period and that the entire family is in need of support to ease their burdens.
PubMed ID
19782901 View in PubMed
Less detail

An observational study of the level at which parents participate in decisions during their child's hospitalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31632
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2002 Mar;9(2):202-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Inger Hallström
Ingrid Runeson
Gunnel Elander
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital, S-221 85 Lund, Sweden. Inger.Hallstrom@skane.se
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2002 Mar;9(2):202-14
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Hospitalized
Child, Preschool
Communication
Consumer Satisfaction
Decision Making
Family Health
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Parents - psychology
Patient Participation
Professional-Family Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Third-Party Consent
Abstract
When a child is hospitalized, the parents find themselves in an unfamiliar environment and their parental role changes. They are in a stressful and often anxiety-filled situation and it may be difficult for them to participate in decisions. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which parents participate in decisions during the course of events when their child is hospitalized. Thirty-five parents of 24 children (aged 5 months to 18 years) were followed by mobile observation during their child's hospitalization in a paediatric department in Sweden. Three researchers analysed field notes in three steps, using manifest and latent coding. In step 1, 119 situations that included a decision process were identified. In step 2, the situations were assessed according to a five-level scale concerning how the parents' wishes, desires or values had been respected. In step 3, each situation was scrutinized with respect to factors influencing the extent of the parents' participation. The results showed that parents have varying ability to be involved in decision making. Professionals need to communicate more openly with them in order to identify and satisfy their needs because some parents are unwilling or incapable of expressing them.
PubMed ID
11944209 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attained education and self-assessed health later in life when diagnosed with diabetes in childhood: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135913
Source
Pediatr Diabetes. 2011 Nov;12(7):619-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Anne Wennick
Inger Hallström
Björn Lindgren
Kristian Bolin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden. anne.wennick@mah.se
Source
Pediatr Diabetes. 2011 Nov;12(7):619-26
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies have reported conflicting findings on academic achievement in children with type 1 diabetes, and generally lower self-assessed health status among respondents with diabetes.
Thus, in this study, using the theoretical framework of the human-capital model, a population-based survey data set for Sweden, and explanatory variables following predictions from theory and previous empirical human-capital studies, individuals diagnosed with diabetes before the age of 19 were examined whether they differ from the general population at the same age concerning (i) educational level attained and (ii) self-assessed health later in life. Special attention was devoted to the association between education and health.
A set of pooled cross-sectional population survey data complemented with register data, comprising 20 670 individuals (of whom 106 individuals were diagnosed with diabetes), aged 19-38 yr, from 1988 to 2000, was created from the Swedish Biennial Survey of Living Conditions.
The influence of childhood diabetes was analyzed using multiple regression analysis, controlling for educational level, wage, sex, age, marital status, and parental ethnicity.
Childhood diabetes was associated with lower levels of attained education and self-assessed health in comparison with the general population. More educated individuals reported better health, though.
In terms of the rapid increase in the incidence of diabetes in many countries, it is important to bear in mind that investments made both in education and in health, early in life, may facilitate the capability of the individual to experience healthy time later in life.
PubMed ID
21435135 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding progression in preterm infants is influenced by factors in infants, mothers and clinical practice: the results of a national cohort study with high breastfeeding initiation rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263816
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e108208
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ragnhild Maastrup
Bo Moelholm Hansen
Hanne Kronborg
Susanne Norby Bojesen
Karin Hallum
Annemi Frandsen
Anne Kyhnaeb
Inge Svarer
Inger Hallström
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e108208
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding - methods - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology
Male
Mothers
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Many preterm infants are not capable of exclusive breastfeeding from birth. To guide mothers in breastfeeding, it is important to know when preterm infants can initiate breastfeeding and progress. The aim was to analyse postmenstrual age (PMA) at breastfeeding milestones in different preterm gestational age (GA) groups, to describe rates of breastfeeding duration at pre-defined times, as well as analyse factors associated with PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding.
The study was part of a prospective survey of a national Danish cohort of preterm infants based on questionnaires and structured telephone interviews, including 1,221 mothers and their 1,488 preterm infants with GA of 24-36 weeks.
Of the preterm infants, 99% initiated breastfeeding and 68% were discharged exclusively breastfed. Breastfeeding milestones were generally reached at different PMAs for different GA groups, but preterm infants were able to initiate breastfeeding at early times, with some delay in infants less than GA 32 weeks. Very preterm infants had lowest mean PMA (35.5 weeks) at first complete breastfeed, and moderate preterm infants had lowest mean PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding (36.4 weeks). Admitting mothers to the NICU together with the infant and minimising the use of a pacifier during breastfeeding transition were associated with 1.6 (95% CI 0.4-2.8) and 1.2 days (95% CI 0.1-2.3) earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding respectively. Infants that were small for gestational age were associated with 5.6 days (95% CI 4.1-7.0) later establishment of exclusive breastfeeding.
Breastfeeding competence is not developed at a fixed PMA, but is influenced by multiple factors in infants, mothers and clinical practice. Admitting mothers together with their infants to the NICU and minimising the use of pacifiers may contribute to earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25251690 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breastfeeding support in neonatal intensive care: a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123706
Source
J Hum Lact. 2012 Aug;28(3):370-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Ragnhild Maastrup
Susanne Norby Bojesen
Hanne Kronborg
Inger Hallström
Author Affiliation
Knowledge Centre for Breastfeeding Infants with Special Needs, Department of Neonatology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. ram@rh.regionh.dk
Source
J Hum Lact. 2012 Aug;28(3):370-9
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - organization & administration - standards - statistics & numerical data
Intensive Care, Neonatal - methods - organization & administration - standards - statistics & numerical data
Organizational Policy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Abstract
The incidence of breastfeeding of preterm infants is affected by the support provided at the hospital and in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). However, policies and guidelines promoting breastfeeding vary both nationally and internationally.
The aim of this survey was to describe breastfeeding support in Danish NICUs, where approximately 98% of mothers initiate lactation.
A national survey of all 19 Danish NICUs was conducted in 2009. Four NICUs were at designated Baby-Friendly hospitals, and 5 had a lactation consultant. In all NICUs, it was possible for some parents to stay overnight; 2 units had short restrictions on parents' presence. Five NICUs had integrated postpartum care for mothers. Breastfeeding policies, written guidelines, and systematic breastfeeding training for the staff were common in most NICUs. Seventeen NICUs recommended starting breast milk expression within 6 hours after birth, and mothers were encouraged to double pump. Most NICUs aimed to initiate skin-to-skin contact the first time the parents were in the NICU, and daily skin-to-skin contact was estimated to last for 2-4 hours in 63% and 4-8 hours in 37% of the units. The use of bottle-feeding was restricted.
The Danish NICUs described the support of breastfeeding as a high priority, which was reflected in the recommended policies for breast milk pumping, skin-to-skin contact, and the parents' presence in the NICU, as well as in the restricted use of bottle-feeding. However, support varied between units, and not all units supported optimal breastfeeding.
PubMed ID
22674965 View in PubMed
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Children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial comparing hospital versus home-based care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122911
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2012 Oct;101(10):1069-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Irén Tiberg
Steen Carlsson Katarina
Annelie Carlsson
Inger Hallström
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences and The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. iren.tiberg@med.lu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2012 Oct;101(10):1069-73
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - psychology - therapy
Female
Health Services - utilization
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Parents - education - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Patient satisfaction
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Abstract
To compare two different regimens for children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes: hospital-based care or hospital-based home care (HBHC), referring to specialist care in a home-based setting.
The trial took place in Sweden with a randomized controlled design and included 60 children, aged 3-15 years. After 2-3 days with hospital-based care, children were randomized to either continued hospital-based care or to HBHC for 6 days. The primary outcome was the child's metabolic control after 2 years. Secondary outcomes were set to evaluate the family and child situation as well as the healthcare services. This article presents data 6 months after diagnosis.
Results showed equivalence between groups in terms of metabolic control, insulin dose, parents' employment and working hours as well as parents' and significant others' absence from work related to the child's diabetes. Parents in the HBHC were more satisfied with the received health care and showed less subsequent healthcare resource use. The level of risk for the family's psychosocial distress assessed at diagnosis was associated with the subsequent use of resources, but not with metabolic control.
HBHC was found to be an equally safe and effective way of providing care as hospital-based care at the onset of type 1 diabetes for children who are medically stable.
PubMed ID
22759081 View in PubMed
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Children's participation in the decision-making process during hospitalization: an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31257
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2002 Nov;9(6):583-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Ingrid Runeson
Inger Hallström
Gunnel Elander
Göran Hermerén
Author Affiliation
Lund University, Sweden. ingrid.runeson@hik.se
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2002 Nov;9(6):583-98
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Child, Preschool
Communication
Conflict (Psychology)
Decision Making
Ethics, Nursing
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Parents - psychology
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Pediatric Nursing - methods
Professional-Family Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Twenty-four children (aged 5 months to 18 years) who were admitted to a university hospital were observed for a total of 135 hours with the aim of describing their degree of participation in decisions concerning their own care. Grading of their participation was made by using a 5-point scale. An assessment was also made of what was considered as optimal participation in each situation. The results indicate that children are not always allowed to participate in decision making to the extent that is considered optimal. In no case was it judged that a child participated in or was forced to make a decision that was too difficult for the child. The interactions between children, parents and staff were also described in connection with discussions and decision-making processes. This showed that parents do not always support their children in difficult situations and that health care staff often inform children about what is going to happen without presenting alternatives or asking for their views. Staff may, however, find themselves facing an ethical conflict in deciding between supporting a child's view or following hospital routine. It is of great importance that children are looked upon as potentially autonomous individuals and that staff members realize that one of their core duties is to facilitate children's participation in decision making concerning their health care.
PubMed ID
12449996 View in PubMed
Less detail

Developing and testing a questionnaire to assess the quality of pain management in acute care in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173141
Source
Pain Manag Nurs. 2005 Sep;6(3):91-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Elisabeth Hansson
Bengt Fridlund
Inger Hallström
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. elisabeth.hansson@med.lu.se
Source
Pain Manag Nurs. 2005 Sep;6(3):91-104
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Pain - nursing
Pain Measurement - methods - nursing
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Specialties, Nursing - methods
Sweden
Abstract
Pain management is an important indicator of the quality of patient care. The aim of this study was to develop and test a questionnaire to assess the quality of pain management in acute care in Sweden with emphasis on validity and reliability, as well as pain severity, interference with function, and patient participation. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with consecutively selected patients in pain (n=100 in study group I and n=127 in study group II) who completed the questionnaire. Cronbach's reliability coefficient alpha for 20 items in the questionnaire was 0.80. The construct validity of the questionnaire was estimated using a principal components analysis. Four orthogonal factors were identified: (1) "Interference with function," (2) "Pain severity," (3) "Communication," and (4) "Participation." The results indicate that the item "pain right now" is reliable and valid, although the item was divided to assess pain at rest as well as with movement. Interference scores were significantly and positively correlated with pain scores at rest and with movement, as well as with average pain scores. High numeric rating scale scores influenced both the patients' enjoyment of life and their capacity to walk and general activity. The questionnaire is considered to be a useful, reliable, and valid self-report tool to assess the quality of pain management in acute care. A few items need to be refined, tested, and evaluated in future research.
PubMed ID
16129380 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effect of two types of minimal acupuncture on stooling, sleeping and feeding in infants with colic: secondary analysis of a multicentre RCT in Sweden (ACU-COL).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311591
Source
Acupunct Med. 2021 04; 39(2):106-115
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2021
Author
Kajsa Landgren
Inger Hallström
Iren Tiberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, 5193Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Acupunct Med. 2021 04; 39(2):106-115
Date
04-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acupuncture Points
Acupuncture Therapy
Child Development
Colic - physiopathology - therapy
Crying
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Sleep
Sweden
Abstract
Evidence for the effect of minimal acupuncture in infants with colic is limited.
To compare the effect of standardized minimal acupuncture, individualized acupuncture (where traditional acupuncture points were chosen according to the infant's symptoms) and no acupuncture on objective measures of stooling, feeding and sleeping in infants with colic (based on diaries) and perceived changes in these parameters (based on parental questionnaires).
This was a secondary analysis of a multicentre randomized controlled three-armed trial conducted in four counties in Sweden between January 2013 and May 2015 (ACU-COL). The effect on crying has already been published and showed a decrease in crying time for the acupuncture groups. Infants, 2-8 weeks old, who cried and fussed for more than 3 h/day for more than 3 days/week, and thereby fulfilled the criteria for infantile colic, received four extra visits to their ordinary child health centre. The infants (n?=?147) were randomly allocated via a computer-generated list to standardized minimal acupuncture at LI4 for 5 s (group A, n?=?48), semi-standardized individual acupuncture with a maximum of five insertions for up to 30 s (group B, n?=?49), or no acupuncture (group C, n?=?48). The parents and the ordinary staff were blinded. Data were collected using: (1) diaries at baseline, during the two intervention weeks and 1-week follow-up; and (2) questionnaires with quantitative and qualitative components used at the second and fourth visits and during a follow-up telephone call. Outcomes were the changes in frequency of stooling and in hours of sleep per day.
There were no differences between groups for stooling, feeding, or sleeping at any time point according to data from the diaries. At the follow-up phone call, more parents in groups A and B (compared to group C) perceived that feeding and sleep had changed and that the symptoms of colic had improved.
PubMed ID
32375501 View in PubMed
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