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According to need? Predicting the amount of municipal home help allocated to elderly recipients in an urban area of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51849
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2005 Jul;13(4):366-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Bettina Meinow
Ingemar Kåreholt
Mårten Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. bettina.meinow@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2005 Jul;13(4):366-77
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Policy
Health services needs and demand
Home Care Services - utilization
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
State Medicine
Sweden
Urban Population
Abstract
Given the cutbacks which have been carried out in the Swedish welfare state despite the unchanged official policy of allocation of home help services according to needs, it is essential to evaluate the factors which guide the allocation of home help today. Whereas numerous studies have identified factors which predict entry into the home help system, the present paper concentrates on predictors of the amount of home help amongst those allocated assistance. Data were obtained from the population-based care and services section of the 2002 Swedish National Study of Aging and Care-Kungsholmen (SNAC-K). All home help recipients (> or = 65 years of age) living in an inner city district of Stockholm (Kungsholmen) were analysed with ordinary least squares regressions to identify predictors of the number of hours of home help (n = 943). Need indicators, i.e. dependency in activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental ADLs (IADLs), and cognitive impairment (Berger scale) were the strongest predictors of more hours of home help. The addition of sociodemographic (i.e. age, gender and income), environmental (i.e. informal care, housing adaptations and housing accessibility) and structural (i.e. variations in allocation decisions between one care manager and another) factors contributed only marginally to the explained variance. Hours of help entitlement increased slightly with greater age. Co-residing individuals were allocated significantly fewer home help hours than those living alone. Income and regular access to informal care were not significant predictors. The fact that services are provided according to need criteria does not necessarily mean that the provided services are adequate to meet needs. On the macro level, social policy decisions and available economic and manpower resources determine the allotment of municipal home help. However, this study in an urban sample suggests that, within the available resources, the amount of home help allocated is guided mainly by need indicators amongst those given assistance.
PubMed ID
15969708 View in PubMed
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Adherence to physical exercise recommendations in people over 65--the SNAC-Kungsholmen study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258217
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2013 Oct;23(5):799-804
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Elisabeth Rydwik
Anna-Karin Welmer
Ingemar Kåreholt
Sara Angleman
Laura Fratiglioni
Hui-Xin Wang
Author Affiliation
1 Departement of Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society, Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2013 Oct;23(5):799-804
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Educational Status
Exercise - psychology
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
There is limited knowledge regarding to what extent the older population meet the recommendations of physical exercise, especially fitness-enhancing exercise. This study assessed participation in health- and fitness-enhancing exercises in people aged >65, and explored to what extent the possible differences in meeting current recommendations differs by age, gender and education.
The study population was derived from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care, and consisted of a random sample of 2593 subjects, aged 65+ years. Participation in health- and fitness-enhancing exercise according to the WHO and the American College of Sports Medicine's recommendations in relation to age, gender and education was evaluated using multinomial logistic regression adjusted for health indicators and physical performance.
According to the recommendations, 46% of the participants fulfilled the criteria for health-enhancing and 16% for fitness-enhancing exercises. Independent of health indicators and physical performance, women
PubMed ID
23115329 View in PubMed
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Alcohol abstinence, non-hazardous use and hazardous use a decade after alcohol-related hospitalization: registry data linked to population-based representative postal surveys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265226
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:874
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kozma Ahacic
Robert F Kennison
Ingemar Kåreholt
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:874
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - therapy
Ethanol - administration & dosage
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although there is evident association between alcohol-related hospitalization and alcohol use, the relationship has not been well examined. This study analyzed the extent of alcohol abstinence, non-hazardous use and hazardous use among people who had experienced alcohol-related hospitalization during the preceding decade.
Registry data concerning alcohol-related hospitalizations between 1996 and 2007 were linked to two representative surveys, in 2006 and 2007, of residents of Stockholm County. Relevant contrasts were modeled, using logistic regression, in the pooled sample (n = 54 955). Ages were 23-84 years at follow-up.
Among persons previously hospitalized (n = 576), half reported non-hazardous use. Non-hazardous use was less prevalent than in the general population--and the extent of non-hazardous use did not change over time following hospitalization. There were no significant age differences, but non-hazardous use was less frequent among people with repeated episodes of care. One in six was abstinent. Abstinence was more common among the old, while hazardous use (exceeding 14 drinks per week for men, and 9 drinks per week for women) decreased with age. Abstinence also increased over time; among persons hospitalized ten years ago, the abstinence rate was twice that of the general population. Associations with hazardous use over time were less conclusive. Hazardous use among those previously hospitalized decreased over time in one sample but not in the other. After pooling the data, there were indications of a decrease over time following hospitalization, but more prevalent hazardous use than in the general population.
Following alcohol-related hospitalization, abstinence increased, and there was no evidence of regression towards the mean, i.e., towards non-hazardous use. Abstinence was also more widespread among previously hospitalized persons of older ages. With advancing age, changing hazardous alcohol habits among previously hospitalized appears to yield a trend towards promotion of abstinence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25150844 View in PubMed
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Are Occupational Complexity and Socioeconomic Position Related to Psychological Distress 20 Years Later?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269398
Source
J Aging Health. 2015 Oct;27(7):1266-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Alexander Darin-Mattsson
Ross Andel
Stefan Fors
Ingemar Kåreholt
Source
J Aging Health. 2015 Oct;27(7):1266-85
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Social Class
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess occupational complexity in midlife in relation to psychological distress in older adulthood (69+ years) and explore the role of socioeconomic position.
Baseline data from the Swedish Level of Living Survey and follow-up data from the Swedish Longitudinal Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old were combined, resulting in 20+ years of follow-up. Data were analyzed using ordered logistic regressions.
Higher occupational complexity was associated with less psychological distress 20 years later adjusted for age, sex, follow-up year, hours worked the year before baseline, and psychological distress at baseline. Higher socioeconomic position yielded the same pattern of results. Socioeconomic position partially accounted for the association between occupational complexity and psychological distress.
With social gradient not easily amenable to modification, efforts to increase engagement at work may offer a viable option to attenuate the influence of work environment on psychological distress later in life.
PubMed ID
25903977 View in PubMed
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The association between mid-life socioeconomic position and health after retirement--exploring the role of working conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108569
Source
J Aging Health. 2013 Aug;25(5):863-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Vanessa Parker
Ross Andel
Charlotta Nilsen
Ingemar Kåreholt
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
J Aging Health. 2013 Aug;25(5):863-81
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retirement
Self Report
Social Class
Social Determinants of Health
Sweden
Workplace - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To explore the role of working conditions in the association between socioeconomic position and health after retirement age using over 20 years follow-up.
Two Swedish nationally representative Level of Living Surveys (total N = 1,131) were used. Ordered logistic regression was used to assess the association between socioeconomic position and health (self-rated health, psychological distress, musculoskeletal pain, circulatory problems, physical and cognitive impairment). The role of physical and psychological working conditions was also assessed.
Lower socioeconomic position was associated with more adverse physical, but not psychological, working conditions. Physical working conditions partially explained the differences in physical impairment and musculoskeletal pain in old age attributed to socioeconomic position, but not differences in self-rated health, circulatory problems, psychological distress, and cognitive impairment. Socioeconomic position was a stronger correlate of health than psychological working conditions alone.
Improving physical working conditions may be important for reducing the influence of socioeconomic position on health after retirement.
PubMed ID
23872823 View in PubMed
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Association of Vitamin B12, Folate, and Sulfur Amino Acids With Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measures in Older Adults: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282511
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Jun 01;73(6):606-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2016
Author
Babak Hooshmand
Francesca Mangialasche
Grégoria Kalpouzos
Alina Solomon
Ingemar Kåreholt
A David Smith
Helga Refsum
Rui Wang
Marc Mühlmann
Birgit Ertl-Wagner
Erika Jonsson Laukka
Lars Bäckman
Laura Fratiglioni
Miia Kivipelto
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Jun 01;73(6):606-13
Date
Jun-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnostic imaging - physiopathology
Amino Acids, Sulfur - blood
Atrophy
Brain - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Female
Folic Acid - blood
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Vitamin B 12 - blood
White Matter - diagnostic imaging
Abstract
Vitamin B12, folate, and sulfur amino acids may be modifiable risk factors for structural brain changes that precede clinical dementia.
To investigate the association of circulating levels of vitamin B12, red blood cell folate, and sulfur amino acids with the rate of total brain volume loss and the change in white matter hyperintensity volume as measured by fluid-attenuated inversion recovery in older adults.
The magnetic resonance imaging subsample of the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen, a population-based longitudinal study in Stockholm, Sweden, was conducted in 501 participants aged 60 years or older who were free of dementia at baseline. A total of 299 participants underwent repeated structural brain magnetic resonance imaging scans from September 17, 2001, to December 17, 2009.
The rate of brain tissue volume loss and the progression of total white matter hyperintensity volume.
In the multi-adjusted linear mixed models, among 501 participants (300 women [59.9%]; mean [SD] age, 70.9 [9.1] years), higher baseline vitamin B12 and holotranscobalamin levels were associated with a decreased rate of total brain volume loss during the study period: for each increase of 1 SD, ß (SE) was 0.048 (0.013) for vitamin B12 (P?
PubMed ID
27120188 View in PubMed
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Associations between work-related stress in late midlife, educational attainment, and serious health problems in old age: a longitudinal study with over 20 years of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265225
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:878
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Charlotta Nilsen
Ross Andel
Stefan Fors
Bettina Meinow
Alexander Darin Mattsson
Ingemar Kåreholt
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:878
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services for the Aged
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Work - psychology
Abstract
People spend a considerable amount of time at work over the course of their lives, which makes the workplace important to health and aging. However, little is known about the potential long-term effects of work-related stress on late-life health. This study aims to examine work-related stress in late midlife and educational attainment in relation to serious health problems in old age.
Data from nationally representative Swedish surveys were used in the analyses (n = 1,502). Follow-up time was 20-24 years. Logistic regressions were used to examine work-related stress (self-reported job demands, job control, and job strain) in relation to serious health problems measured as none, serious problems in one health domain, and serious problems in two or three health domains (complex health problems).
While not all results were statistically significant, high job demands were associated with higher odds of serious health problems among women but lower odds of serious health problems among men. Job control was negatively associated with serious health problems. The strongest association in this study was between high job strain and complex health problems. After adjustment for educational attainment some of the associations became statistically nonsignificant. However, high job demands, remained related to lower odds of serious problems in one health domain among men, and low job control remained associated with higher odds of complex health problems among men. High job demands were associated with lower odds of complex health problems among men with low education, but not among men with high education, or among women regardless of level of education.
The results underscore the importance of work-related stress for long-term health. Modification to work environment to reduce work stress (e.g., providing opportunities for self-direction/monitoring levels of psychological job demands) may serve as a springboard for the development of preventive strategies to improve public health both before and after retirement.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25159829 View in PubMed
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Beaten and poor? A study of the long-term economic situation of women victims of severe violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105364
Source
Soc Work Public Health. 2014;29(2):100-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Sven Trygged
Ebba Hedlund
Ingemar Kåreholt
Author Affiliation
a Department of Social Work , Stockholm University , Stockholm , Sweden.
Source
Soc Work Public Health. 2014;29(2):100-13
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Crime Victims - statistics & numerical data
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Social Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Time Factors
Trauma Severity Indices
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
This 10-year follow-up study based on Swedish national registers compares the economic situation of women victims of violence leading to hospitalization (n = 6,085) to nonexposed women (n = 55,016) in 1992 to 2005. Women exposed to severe violence had a poorer financial situation prior to the assault. Violence seems to heavily reinforce this pattern, indicating a continued need of support from the social work profession. Assaulted women had a worse income development, lower odds for being in employment, and higher odds for having low incomes and means tested social assistance during the 10-year follow-up, independent of having children or not.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24405195 View in PubMed
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Body-mass index and mortality in incident dementia: a cohort study on 11,398 patients from SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260111
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2014 Jun;15(6):447.e1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Sara García-Ptacek
Ingemar Kåreholt
Bahman Farahmand
Maria Luz Cuadrado
Dorota Religa
Maria Eriksdotter
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2014 Jun;15(6):447.e1-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Dementia - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Body mass index (BMI) is used worldwide as an indirect measure of nutritional status and has been shown to be associated with mortality. Controversy exists over the cut points associated with lowest mortality, particularly in older populations. In patients suffering from dementia, information on BMI and mortality could improve decisions about patient care.
The objective was to explore the association between BMI and mortality risk in an incident dementia cohort.
Cohort study based on SveDem, the Swedish Quality Dementia Registry; 2008-2011.
Specialist memory clinics, Sweden.
A total of 11,398 patients with incident dementia with data on BMI (28,190 person-years at risk for death).
Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for mortality associated with BMI were calculated, controlling for age, sex, dementia type, results from Mini-Mental State Examination, and number of medications. BMI categories and linear splines were used.
Higher BMI was associated with decreased mortality risk, with all higher BMI categories showing reduced risk relative to patients with BMI of 18.5 to 22.9 kg/m(2), whereas underweight patients (BMI
PubMed ID
24721339 View in PubMed
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Can chronic multimorbidity explain the age-related differences in strength, speed and balance in older adults?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120872
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2012 Oct;24(5):480-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Anna-Karin Welmer
Ingemar Kåreholt
Sara Angleman
Elisabeth Rydwik
Laura Fratiglioni
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. anna-karin.welmer@ki.se
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2012 Oct;24(5):480-9
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Hand Strength
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness
Postural Balance
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Walking
Abstract
It is known that physical performance declines with age in general, however there remains much to be understood in terms of age-related differences amongst older adults across a variety of physical components (such as speed, strength and balance), and particularly in terms of the role played by multimorbidity of chronic diseases. We aimed to detect the age-related differences across four components of physical performance and to explore to what extent chronic diseases and multimorbidity may explain such differences.
We analyzed cross-sectional data from a population-based sample of 3323 people, aged 60 years and older from the SNAC-K study, Stockholm, Sweden. Physical performance was assessed by trained nurses using several tests (grip strength, walking speed, balance and chair stands). Clinical diagnoses were made by the examining physician based on clinical history and examination.
Censored normal regression analyses showed that the 72-90+ year-old persons had 17-40% worse grip strength, 44-86% worse balance, 30-86% worse chair stand score, and 21-59% worse walking speed, compared with the 60-66 year-old persons. Chronic diseases were strongly associated with physical impairment, and this association was particularly strong among the younger men. However, chronic diseases explained only some of the age-related differences in physical performance. When controlling for chronic diseases in the analyses, the age-related differences in physical performance changed 1-11%.
In spite of the strong association between multimorbidity and physical impairment, chronic morbidities explained only a small part of the age-related differences in physical performance.
PubMed ID
22961066 View in PubMed
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41 records – page 1 of 5.