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Calories and portion sizes in recipes throughout 100 years: an overlooked factor in the development of overweight and obesity?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108469
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):839-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Maj Bloch Eidner
Anne-Sofie Qvistgaard Lund
Bodil Schroll Harboe
Inge Haunstrup Clemmensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Prevention & Documentation, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):839-45
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cookbooks as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Energy intake
Humans
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Portion Size - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Abstract
Large portion sizes have been associated with large energy intake, which can contribute to the development of overweight and obesity. Portion sizes of non-home cooked food have increased in the past 20 years, however, less is known about portion sizes of home-cooked food.
The aim of the study was to assess if the portion sizes measured in calories in Danish cookbook recipes have changed throughout the past 100 years.
Portion size measured in calories was determined by content-analysis of 21 classic Danish recipes in 13 editions of the famous Danish cookbook "Food" from 1909 to 2009. Calorie content of the recipes was determined in standard nutritional software, and the changes in calories were examined by simple linear regression analyses.
Mean portion size in calories increased significantly by 21% (ß = 0.63; p
PubMed ID
23885112 View in PubMed
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'Neighbour smoke'--exposure to secondhand smoke in multiunit dwellings in Denmark in 2010: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123485
Source
Tob Control. 2013 May;22(3):190-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Brian Køster
Anne-Line Brink
Inge Haunstrup Clemmensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Department of Prevention and Documentation, Strandboulevarden 49, Copenhagen DK-2100, Denmark. koester_brian@yahoo.com
Source
Tob Control. 2013 May;22(3):190-3
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - analysis - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Housing - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Smoke-Free Policy
Smoking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - analysis - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
'Neighbour smoke' is transfer of secondhand smoke between apartments including shared areas, such as hallways, community rooms and stairwells in multiunit dwellings and is an emerging issue for public health and health equity.
To describe the prevalence of exposure to neighbour smoke in Denmark.
A population-based sample of 5049 respondents (2183 in multiunit dwellings) living in Denmark aged =15 years completed a questionnaire in 2010 on tobacco-related behaviour and exposure to secondhand smoke. The authors examined the relations between exposure to neighbour smoke, own smoking, smoking inside the home, type of residence and demographic factors with descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis.
In this sample, 22% of those living in multiunit dwellings reported exposure to neighbour smoke. Of respondents living in apartments, 41% preferred to live in a building in which smoking is banned. Smoke-free buildings were preferred by 58% of persons exposed to neighbour smoke compared with 37% of persons not exposed. Of the smokers (daily and occasional), 14% preferred to live in a smoke-free building; 31% never smoked indoors in their own home.
The only way to avoid absorbing tobacco smoke from neighbours is to live in a smoke-free multiunit dwelling. There is great demand for such dwellings, especially by young people, people with children and people exposed to neighbour smoke, as well as by people who smoke.
PubMed ID
22693208 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Apr 19;166(17):1570-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-2004
Author
Eva Irene Prescott
Inge Haunstrup Clemmensen
Knud Juel
Author Affiliation
H:S Rigshospitalet, Kardiologisk Afdeling B, Kraeftens Bekaempelse, Forebyggelses- og Dokumentations-afdelingen, Statens Institut for Folkesundhed. eva.prescott@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Apr 19;166(17):1570-3
Date
Apr-19-2004
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Smoking - adverse effects - mortality - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods
PubMed ID
15146691 View in PubMed
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Vacations to sunny destinations, sunburn, and intention to tan: a cross-sectional study in Denmark, 2007-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137617
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Feb;39(1):64-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Brian Køster
Camilla Thorgaard
Anja Philip
Inge Haunstrup Clemmensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Department of Prevention and Documentation, Copenhagen, Denmark. koester_brian@yahoo.com
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Feb;39(1):64-9
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Holidays
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - etiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Sunbathing - psychology
Sunburn - etiology - prevention & control
Sunscreening Agents - administration & dosage
Travel
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Denmark has experienced an increase in melanoma incidence since the 1960s. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the main preventable cause of this cancer. We examined current travel to, and sun-related behaviour of Danes at, sunny destinations in relation to their risk for sunburn.
A population-based sample of 11,158 respondents aged 15-59 years completed three questionnaires in 2007-2009 that included items on exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Using logistic regression analysis we examined the relations between sunny vacations, sun-related behaviour, demographic factors and risk for sunburn.
During 2007-2009, 44.8-45.8% of the respondents travelled to a sunny destination at least once a year; 24% became sunburnt, and 69% tanned intentionally. The odds ratio for sunburn in general for people who went on a sunny vacation as compared with those who did not was 1.6 (1.5-1.7). Sunscreen use (1.9; 1.4-2.6) and intentional tanning (3.4; 2.8-4.1) were positively associated with sunburn on vacation.
Taking a vacation in a sunny place is a risk factor for sunburn, especially for young people. The recommendation for sunscreen use should be re-evaluated, as intention to tan is the most important factor in sunburn on vacation and should be targeted more strategically.
PubMed ID
21266589 View in PubMed
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Validity of diagnoses of and operations for nonmalignant gynecological conditions in the Danish National Hospital Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191827
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2002 Feb;55(2):137-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Jesper Kjaergaard
Inge Haunstrup Clemmensen
Birthe Lykke Thomsen
Hans H Storm
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Cancer Prevention and Documentation, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. jesperk@cancer.dk
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2002 Feb;55(2):137-42
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic Errors
Female
Genital Diseases, Female - diagnosis - surgery
Humans
Registries - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The recording of surgical procedures for and diagnoses of nonmalignant gynecological conditions in the Danish National Hospital Registry in 1977-1988 were evaluated by comparison with discharge summaries for a sample of 4,919 women. A serious problem was found in the validity of the diagnoses. Little variation was seen over the period of observation. The coding of operations was considered valid. The results of the study raise concern in view of the widespread use of the registry data in medical research. The authors suggest that data from the registry should be thoroughly evaluated before firm conclusions based on such data are published, and that efforts to improve the validity of the data in the Danish National Hospital Registry are increased.
PubMed ID
11809351 View in PubMed
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