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The increase in symptoms of anxiety and depressed mood among Icelandic adolescents: time trend between 2006 and 2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292604
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2017 10 01; 27(5):856-861
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2017
Author
Ingibjorg E Thorisdottir
Bryndis B Asgeirsdottir
Rannveig Sigurvinsdottir
John P Allegrante
Inga D Sigfusdottir
Author Affiliation
Icelandic Centre for Social Research and Analysis, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2017 10 01; 27(5):856-861
Date
10-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Psychology, Adolescent - statistics & numerical data - trends
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Both research and popular media reports suggest that adolescent mental health has been deteriorating across societies with advanced economies. This study sought to describe the trends in self-reported symptoms of depressed mood and anxiety among Icelandic adolescents.
Data for this study come from repeated, cross-sectional, population-based school surveys of 43 482 Icelandic adolescents in 9th and 10th grade, with six waves of pooled data from 2006 to 2016. We used analysis of variance, linear regression and binomial logistic regression to examine trends in symptom scores of anxiety and depressed mood over time. Gender differences in trends of high symptoms were also tested for interactions.
Linear regression analysis showed a significant linear increase over the course of the study period in mean symptoms of anxiety and depressed mood for girls only; however, symptoms of anxiety among boys decreased. The proportion of adolescents reporting high depressive symptoms increased by 1.6% for boys and 6.8% for girls; the proportion of those reporting high anxiety symptoms increased by 1.3% for boys and 8.6% for girls. Over the study period, the odds for reporting high depressive symptoms and high anxiety symptoms were significantly higher for both genders. Girls were more likely to report high symptoms of anxiety and depressed mood than boys.
Self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depressed mood have increased over time among Icelandic adolescents. Our findings suggest that future research needs to look beyond mean changes and examine the trends among those adolescents who report high symptoms of emotional distress.
PubMed ID
28957485 View in PubMed
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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and scholastic achievement in childhood: evidence from the LIFECOURSE cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292606
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2017 10 01; 27(5):850-855
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2017
Author
Alfgeir L Kristjansson
Ingibjorg E Thorisdottir
Thora Steingrimsdottir
John P Allegrante
Christa L Lilly
Inga D Sigfusdottir
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Behavioural Sciences, School of Public Health, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2017 10 01; 27(5):850-855
Date
10-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Academic Success
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland
Linear Models
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Research on the impact of maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) on scholastic achievement in the offspring has shown conflicting findings. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of MSDP on scholastic achievement in a birth cohort of children in 4th, 7th and 10th grades.
We analysed data from the LIFECOURSE study, a cohort study of risk and protective factors in all children born in Reykjavik, Iceland, in the year 2000 (N = 1151, girls = 49.3%). Retrospective registry data for 2014-2015 were merged with prospective survey data that were collected in April 2016. Data on MSDP were assessed during regular antenatal visits at the end of the first trimester. Standardized academic achievement scores were obtained from official school transcripts. Data were analysed using OLS regressions that were entered in three hierarchical blocks.
Children of mothers who smoked tobacco during the first trimester consistently revealed between 5% and 7% lower scores on standardized academic achievement in 4th, 7th and 10th grade (~6-8 points on a normally distributed 120 point scale) than those of mothers who had not smoked tobacco during this period (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
28957474 View in PubMed
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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and scholastic achievement in childhood: evidence from the LIFECOURSE cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286035
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2017 Oct 01;27(5):850-855
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Alfgeir L Kristjansson
Ingibjorg E Thorisdottir
Thora Steingrimsdottir
John P Allegrante
Christa L Lilly
Inga D Sigfusdottir
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2017 Oct 01;27(5):850-855
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Research on the impact of maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) on scholastic achievement in the offspring has shown conflicting findings. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of MSDP on scholastic achievement in a birth cohort of children in 4th, 7th and 10th grades.
We analysed data from the LIFECOURSE study, a cohort study of risk and protective factors in all children born in Reykjavik, Iceland, in the year 2000 (N = 1151, girls = 49.3%). Retrospective registry data for 2014-2015 were merged with prospective survey data that were collected in April 2016. Data on MSDP were assessed during regular antenatal visits at the end of the first trimester. Standardized academic achievement scores were obtained from official school transcripts. Data were analysed using OLS regressions that were entered in three hierarchical blocks.
Children of mothers who smoked tobacco during the first trimester consistently revealed between 5% and 7% lower scores on standardized academic achievement in 4th, 7th and 10th grade (~6-8 points on a normally distributed 120 point scale) than those of mothers who had not smoked tobacco during this period (P
PubMed ID
28957474 View in PubMed
Less detail

Secular trends in overweight and obesity among Icelandic adolescents: do parental education levels and family structure play a part?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116144
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Jun;41(4):384-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Sigridur Þ Eidsdóttir
Álfgeir l Kristjánsson
Inga D Sigfúsdóttir
Carol E Garber
John P Allegrante
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Behavior Studies, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA. thora.eid@gmail.com
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Jun;41(4):384-91
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Parents
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate whether the secular trend in the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity among 16- to 20-year-old adolescents in Iceland varied by levels of parental education and family structure.
Odds ratios were calculated from repeated population-based, cross-sectional surveys comprising cohorts of 16- to 20-year-old Icelandic adolescents attending junior colleges in 1992 (n=4,922), 2004 (n=11,031), 2007 (n=11,229), and 2010 (n=11,388). Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from self-reported weight and height and categorised as normal weight or overweight and obese, and examined in relation to parental education level and family structure.
The odds of being overweight increased by 2.62 and 1.71 for boys and girls respectively over each of the survey time points. The prevalence of overweight and obesity increased across all three subgroups (low, medium, and high) of parental education level. The probability of overweight across all years were consistently the highest for youths with parents in the low-education category followed by middle-educated and high-educated parental background (p
PubMed ID
23429266 View in PubMed
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Trends in body mass index among Icelandic adolescents and young adults from 1992 to 2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96382
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2010 May;7(5):2191-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Sigrídur P Eiõsdóttir
Alfgeir L Kristjánsson
Inga D Sigfúsdóttir
Carol E Garber
John P Allegrante
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Behavior Studies, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA. ste2105@columbia.edu
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2010 May;7(5):2191-207
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Trends in body mass index (BMI) among 51,889 14- to 20-year-old Icelandic adolescents and young adults were examined using data from cross-sectional population surveys conducted from 1992 to 2007. Prevalence of overweight increased for both genders in all age groups, except for 14- and 20-year-old girls. Obesity prevalence increased among boys in all age groups, except for 16-year-olds, and among 15- and 20-year-old girls. The largest increase in obesity rates among both genders was found in the oldest age group. Moreover, not only has the prevalence of obesity increased, but also the extent of obesity has grown more severe among 15- and 17-year-olds boys and among girls in the oldest age group.
PubMed ID
20623019 View in PubMed
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