Skip header and navigation

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Entrepreneurship of dietetic program graduates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177005
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2004;65(4):166-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Linda L Mann
Ilya Blum
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2004;65(4):166-73
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Career Choice
Dietetics - education - organization & administration
Education, Graduate
Entrepreneurship
Female
Humans
Internship, Nonmedical
Male
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Abstract
Successful dietetic program graduates must have an entrepreneurial mindset and skills to respond to environmental changes and consumer trends. The purpose of this study was to determine current or intended entrepreneurship by graduates of a Dietitians of Canada accredited university program, as influenced by self-efficacy stemming from entrepreneurial experiences in education or early career, as well as by internal and external factors. This study employed an exploratory descriptive methodology with a questionnaire mailed to a discrete sample. Ninety graduates completed and returned the questionnaire for a response rate of 55%. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, two-way table analysis, the chi-square test for independence, and Fisher's exact test. Significant relationships were found between self-efficacy scores and entrepreneurial action, specific entrepreneurial experiences and entrepreneurial intent and action, dietetic internship and intent, and belief in the importance of business skills and intent. Those with entrepreneurial intent and/or action identified creativity, dietetic education/internship, persistence, business skills, and family/friend support as helping factors. These results suggest that undergraduate, internship, and continuing education programs for dietitians should incorporate activities that develop entrepreneurial skills and contribute toward an entrepreneurial mindset.
PubMed ID
15596035 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sexuality and HIV/AIDS: an exploration of older heterosexual women's knowledge levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115593
Source
J Women Aging. 2013;25(2):165-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Pamela Ross
Áine M Humble
Ilya Blum
Author Affiliation
Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness, Halifax, NS, Canada. Pamela.Ross@gov.ns.ca
Source
J Women Aging. 2013;25(2):165-82
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - transmission
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Questionnaires
Sex Education
Sexual Behavior
Sexuality
Abstract
Sexuality research tends to ignore older populations, and little is known about older women's sexual health knowledge. To fill this research gap, 186 Canadian heterosexual women 50 years and older were surveyed about their knowledge regarding sexuality and HIV/AIDS. Respondents had moderate levels of overall knowledge of sexual health and aging, correctly answering, on average, 60% of the 35 questions. They had lower levels of HIV/AIDS knowledge, correctly answering just over 50% of the 25 questions. Results indicate the need for social awareness and education in this group regarding both general sexual health later in life and HIV/AIDS.
PubMed ID
23488650 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary habits and health beliefs of Chinese Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150391
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2009;70(2):73-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Stephanie Kwok
Linda Mann
Kwan Wong
Ilya Blum
Author Affiliation
Dietitians of Canada, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2009;70(2):73-80
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
China - ethnology
Cooking - methods
Demography
Diet - ethnology - psychology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Fruit
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hong Kong - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Sciences - education
Ontario
Probability
Questionnaires
Taiwan - ethnology
Vegetables
Abstract
The relationships among dietary behaviours, traditional health beliefs (THB), and demographic characteristics of Chinese Canadians living in Toronto were examined, as were their primary sources of nutrition information.
Through the use of probability sampling, 106 adult subjects who originated from China, Hong Kong, or Taiwan were recruited from five Chinese community organizations. A telephone interview, employing a tested questionnaire, was conducted in Cantonese or Mandarin. All data were analyzed with MS Excel and SPSS statistical software.
Dietary acculturation is gradual and individual. Participants reported regular intakes of fruits and vegetables and fat-reducing behaviours. Most used both Chinese and Western cooking methods. Practices based on traditional Chinese health beliefs (THB), such as balancing yin and yang foods to promote health, were prevalent. Participants were grouped as THB-strong, THB-moderate, or THB-weak, on the basis of their health belief scores. Various significant relationships among the variables were identified. Chinese media, friends, and family were the primary sources of nutrition information; dietitians were identified by only 12%.
This is the first study to apply a THB grouping for Chinese Canadians. Results will provide an important basis for nutrition interventions to encourage immigrants to make healthy food choices, using both traditional and Western foods.
PubMed ID
19515270 View in PubMed
Less detail

School food practices of prospective teachers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159845
Source
J Sch Health. 2007 Dec;77(10):694-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Melissa Rossiter
Theresa Glanville
Jennifer Taylor
Ilya Blum
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Rd E, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1. mmacewen@uoguelph.ca
Source
J Sch Health. 2007 Dec;77(10):694-700
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Faculty
Female
Food Habits
Food Services
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Ontario
Schools
Students
Abstract
Schoolteachers can affect students' eating habits in several ways: through nutrition knowledge, positive role modeling, and avoidance of unhealthy classroom food practices. In this study, the knowledge, attitudes, and eating behaviors of prospective teachers as determinants of intended classroom food practices and the school environment and its potential impact on classroom food practices were examined and explored.
One hundred and three students (response rate 79%) enrolled in the final year of a bachelor of education program with at least 22 weeks of practice teaching completed a self-administered questionnaire adapted from the Teens Eating for Energy and Nutrition at School teaching staff survey. Indexes related to classroom food practices, school food environment, personal health, fat intake, and nutrition knowledge were constructed and explored quantitatively using linear modeling techniques and contingency table analysis.
The majority of respondents reported a high fat intake (65%) and had mid-to-low nutrition knowledge (72%). While most respondents (93%) believed that a healthy school food environment was important, two thirds reported unhealthy classroom food practices. Unhealthy classroom food practices were more likely to be used by those intending to teach at the secondary level, those who held a high personal health belief, and those who demonstrated less support for a healthy school environment.
These findings suggest that knowledge, attitudes, and food behaviors of prospective teachers may be barriers to promoting healthy food habits to their future students. Further, prospective teachers would benefit from policies and programs that support healthy classroom practices and from compulsory nutrition education in the teacher training curriculum.
PubMed ID
18076415 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can Canadian seniors on public pensions afford a nutritious diet?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157087
Source
Can J Aging. 2008;27(1):69-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Rebecca J Green
Patricia L Williams
C Shanthi Johnson
Ilya Blum
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, Canada.
Source
Can J Aging. 2008;27(1):69-79
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet - economics
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Male
Nutritive Value
Pensions
Abstract
This study examined whether Canada's public pensions (Old Age Security and Canada Pension Plan) provided adequate income for seniors living in Nova Scotia in 2005 to afford a basic nutritious diet. Monthly incomes were compared to essential monthly expenses for four household scenarios: (a) married couple, 80 years and 78 years, in urban Nova Scotia; (b) single male, 77 years in rural Nova Scotia; (c) a couple, 70 years and 65 years, in rural Nova Scotia; (d) widowed female, 85 years, in urban Nova Scotia. The monthly food costs for the four households were CAN$313.32, $193.83, $316.71, and $150.89, respectively. Results showed that both single-member households lacked the necessary funds for a nutritious diet, while living with a partner seemed to protect against inadequate financial resources. These findings illustrate the need to improve Canada's retirement systems to ensure all seniors have adequate financial resources to meet their basic needs-including nutritious food-prevent chronic disease, and ultimately improve quality of life.
PubMed ID
18492638 View in PubMed
Less detail

Affordability of a nutritious diet for income assistance recipients in Nova Scotia (2002-2010).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121472
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 May-Jun;103(3):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricia L Williams
Cynthia G Watt
Michelle Amero
Barbara J Anderson
Ilya Blum
Rebecca Green-LaPierre
Christine P Johnson
Debra E Reimer
Author Affiliation
Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS. patty.williams@msvu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 May-Jun;103(3):183-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet - economics
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Poverty - economics
Social Welfare - economics
Abstract
This study assessed the affordability of a basic nutritious diet for selected household types relying on income assistance (IA) by comparing potential incomes to the costs of the National Nutritious Food Basket (NNFB) and other essential expenditures in Nova Scotia from 2002 to 2010, and examined the adequacy of IA allowances during this time period.
The cost of the NNFB was surveyed across a random sample of grocery stores in NS during five time periods: 2002, 2004/05, 2007, 2008 and 2010, and was factored into affordability scenarios for three household types relying on IA: a family of four, a lone mother with three children, and a lone male. Essential monthly expenses were deducted from total net income to determine if adequate funds remained for the NNFB.
For each time period examined, the findings demonstrated that all household types faced a significant monthly deficit if they purchased a basic nutritious diet. In each household scenario, the potential monthly deficits increased from 2002 to 2010, ranging from $112 in 2002 for a lone mother with three children to $523 in 2010 for a lone male.
Despite increases in allowances, these findings suggest that the risk of food insecurity has increased for IA-dependent households in NS. To address this public health challenge, public health practitioners must advocate for integrated, progressive and sustainable social welfare policies that ensure that individuals and families relying on IA have adequate income and other supports to meet their basic needs, including access to a healthy diet.
PubMed ID
22905636 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.