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Acute-Phase Blood Pressure Levels Correlate With a High Risk of Recurrent Strokes in Young-Onset Ischemic Stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282505
Source
Stroke. 2016 Jun;47(6):1593-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Satu Mustanoja
Jukka Putaala
Daniel Gordin
Lauri Tulkki
Karoliina Aarnio
Jani Pirinen
Ida Surakka
Juha Sinisalo
Mika Lehto
Turgut Tatlisumak
Source
Stroke. 2016 Jun;47(6):1593-8
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Blood Pressure - physiology
Brain Ischemia - physiopathology - therapy
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Recurrence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Stroke - physiopathology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
High blood pressure (BP) in acute stroke has been associated with a poor outcome; however, this has not been evaluated in young adults.
The relationship between BP and long-term outcome was assessed in 1004 consecutive young, first-ever ischemic stroke patients aged 15 to 49 years enrolled in the Helsinki Young Stroke Registry. BP parameters included systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure at admission and 24 hours. The primary outcome measure was recurrent stroke in the long-term follow-up. Adjusted for demographics and preexisting comorbidities, Cox regression models were used to assess independent BP parameters associated with outcome.
Of our patients (63% male), 393 patients (39%) had prestroke hypertension and 358 (36%) used antihypertensive treatment. The median follow-up period was 8.9 years (interquartile range 5.7-13.2). Patients with a recurrent stroke (n=142, 14%) had significantly higher admission SBP, diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure (P
PubMed ID
27217509 View in PubMed
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Founder population-specific HapMap panel increases power in GWA studies through improved imputation accuracy and CNV tagging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141086
Source
Genome Res. 2010 Oct;20(10):1344-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Ida Surakka
Kati Kristiansson
Verneri Anttila
Michael Inouye
Chris Barnes
Loukas Moutsianas
Veikko Salomaa
Mark Daly
Aarno Palotie
Leena Peltonen
Samuli Ripatti
Author Affiliation
Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, FIMM, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Genome Res. 2010 Oct;20(10):1344-51
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA Copy Number Variations - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Finland
Founder Effect
Gene Frequency
Genetics, Population
Genome-Wide Association Study - methods
Genotype
Humans
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Reproducibility of Results
Software
Abstract
The combining of genome-wide association (GWA) data across populations represents a major challenge for massive global meta-analyses. Genotype imputation using densely genotyped reference samples facilitates the combination of data across different genotyping platforms. HapMap data is typically used as a reference for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) imputation and tagging copy number polymorphisms (CNPs). However, the advantage of having population-specific reference panels for founder populations has not been evaluated. We looked at the properties and impact of adding 81 individuals from a founder population to HapMap3 reference data on imputation quality, CNP tagging, and power to detect association in simulations and in an independent cohort of 2138 individuals. The gain in SNP imputation accuracy was highest among low-frequency markers (minor allele frequency [MAF]
Notes
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PubMed ID
20810666 View in PubMed
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Genomic, transcriptomic, and lipidomic profiling highlights the role of inflammation in individuals with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116304
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2013 Apr;33(4):847-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Pirkka-Pekka Laurila
Ida Surakka
Antti-Pekka Sarin
Laxman Yetukuri
Tuulia Hyötyläinen
Sanni Söderlund
Jussi Naukkarinen
Jing Tang
Johannes Kettunen
Daniel B Mirel
Jarkko Soronen
Terho Lehtimäki
Aimo Ruokonen
Christian Ehnholm
Johan G Eriksson
Veikko Salomaa
Antti Jula
Olli T Raitakari
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Aarno Palotie
Leena Peltonen
Matej Oresic
Matti Jauhiainen
Marja-Riitta Taskinen
Samuli Ripatti
Author Affiliation
Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, FIMM, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2013 Apr;33(4):847-57
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Coronary Artery Disease - blood - genetics - immunology
Female
Finland
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Regulatory Networks
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genomics
HLA Antigens - genetics
Health Surveys
Humans
Inflammation - blood - genetics - immunology
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Plasmalogens - blood
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Quantitative Trait Loci
Risk factors
Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 - blood
Abstract
Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is associated with cardiometabolic pathologies. In this study, we investigate the biological pathways and individual genes behind low HDL-C by integrating results from 3 high-throughput data sources: adipose tissue transcriptomics, HDL lipidomics, and dense marker genotypes from Finnish individuals with low or high HDL-C (n=450).
In the pathway analysis of genetic data, we demonstrate that genetic variants within inflammatory pathways were enriched among low HDL-C associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and the expression of these pathways upregulated in the adipose tissue of low HDL-C subjects. The lipidomic analysis highlighted the change in HDL particle quality toward putatively more inflammatory and less vasoprotective state in subjects with low HDL-C, as evidenced by their decreased antioxidative plasmalogen contents. We show that the focal point of these inflammatory pathways seems to be the HLA region with its low HDL-associated alleles also associating with more abundant local transcript levels in adipose tissue, increased plasma vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1) levels, and decreased HDL particle plasmalogen contents, markers of adipose tissue inflammation, vascular inflammation, and HDL antioxidative potential, respectively. In a population-based look-up of the inflammatory pathway single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a large Finnish cohorts (n=11 211), no association of the HLA region was detected for HDL-C as quantitative trait, but with extreme HDL-C phenotypes, implying the presence of low or high HDL genes in addition to the population-genomewide association studies-identified HDL genes.
Our study highlights the role of inflammation with a genetic component in subjects with low HDL-C and identifies novel cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) variants in HLA region to be associated with low HDL-C.
PubMed ID
23413431 View in PubMed
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NordicDB: a Nordic pool and portal for genome-wide control data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141873
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2010 Dec;18(12):1322-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Monica Leu
Keith Humphreys
Ida Surakka
Emil Rehnberg
Juha Muilu
Päivi Rosenström
Peter Almgren
Juha Jääskeläinen
Richard P Lifton
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Jaakko Kaprio
Nancy L Pedersen
Aarno Palotie
Per Hall
Henrik Grönberg
Leif Groop
Leena Peltonen
Juni Palmgren
Samuli Ripatti
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. monica.leu@ki.se
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2010 Dec;18(12):1322-6
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Databases, Genetic
Gene Pool
Genetic Variation
Genetics, Population
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Internet
Scandinavia
Abstract
A cost-efficient way to increase power in a genetic association study is to pool controls from different sources. The genotyping effort can then be directed to large case series. The Nordic Control database, NordicDB, has been set up as a unique resource in the Nordic area and the data are available for authorized users through the web portal (http://www.nordicdb.org). The current version of NordicDB pools together high-density genome-wide SNP information from ~5000 controls originating from Finnish, Swedish and Danish studies and shows country-specific allele frequencies for SNP markers. The genetic homogeneity of the samples was investigated using multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis and pairwise allele frequency differences between the studies. The plot of the first two MDS components showed excellent resemblance to the geographical placement of the samples, with a clear NW-SE gradient. We advise researchers to assess the impact of population structure when incorporating NordicDB controls in association studies. This harmonized Nordic database presents a unique genome-wide resource for future genetic association studies in the Nordic countries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20664631 View in PubMed
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The Value of FLG Null Mutations in Predicting Treatment Response in Atopic Dermatitis: An Observational Study in Finnish Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287031
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2017 Apr 06;97(4):456-463
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-06-2017
Author
Tiia Maria Luukkonen
Ville Kiiski
Maria Ahola
Johanna Mandelin
Hannele Virtanen
Minna Pöyhönen
Sirpa Kivirikko
Ida Surakka
Sakari Reitamo
Aarno Palotie
Markku Heliövaara
Eveliina Jakkula
Anita Remitz
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2017 Apr 06;97(4):456-463
Date
Apr-06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - diagnosis - drug therapy - genetics
Female
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Intermediate Filament Proteins - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Pharmacogenetics
Pharmacogenomic Variants
Phenotype
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The contribution of filaggrin null mutations to predicting atopic dermatitis (AD) treatment response is not clear, nor have such mutations been studied in the Finnish population. This study tested the association of the 4 most prevalent European FLG null mutations, the 2 Finnish enriched FLG null mutations, the FLG 12-repeat allele, and 50 additional epidermal barrier gene variants, with risk of AD, disease severity, clinical features, risk of other atopic diseases, age of onset, and treatment response in 501 patients with AD and 1,710 controls. AD, early-onset AD, palmar hyperlinearity, and asthma showed significant associations with the combined FLG null genotype. Disease severity and treatment response were independent of patient FLG status. Carrier frequencies of R501X, 2282del4, and S3247X were notably lower in Finns compared with reported frequencies in other populations. This data confirms FLG mutations as risk factors for AD in Finns, but also questions their feasibility as biomarkers in predicting treatment response.
PubMed ID
27840886 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.