Skip header and navigation

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Alcohol consumption, types of alcoholic beverages and risk of venous thromboembolism - the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134175
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2011 Aug;106(2):272-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Ida J Hansen-Krone
Sigrid K Brækkan
Kristin F Enga
Tom Wilsgaard
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hematological research group in Tromsø (HERG), Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. ida.j.hansen-krone@uit.no
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2011 Aug;106(2):272-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Beer
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - etiology - prevention & control
Wine
Abstract
Moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to protect against cardiovascular diseases. The association between alcohol consumption, especially types of alcoholic beverages, and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is less well described. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of alcohol consumption and different alcoholic beverages on risk of VTE. Information on alcohol consumption was collected by a self-administrated questionnaire in 26,662 subjects, aged 25-97 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study, in 1994-1995. Subjects were followed through September 1, 2007 with incident VTE as the primary outcome. There were 460 incident VTE-events during a median of 12.5 years of follow-up. Total alcohol consumption was not associated with risk of incident VTE. However, subjects consuming = 3 units of liquor per week had 53% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotalers in analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, cancer, previous cardiovascular disease, physical activity and higher education (HR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.00-2.33). Contrary, subjects with a wine intake of = 3 units/week had 22% reduced risk of VTE (HR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.47-1.30), further adjustment for liquor and beer intake strengthened the protective effect of wine (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.30-1.00). Frequent binge drinkers (= 1/week) had a 17% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotallers (HR 1.17, 95% CI: 0.66-2.09), and a 47% increased risk compared to non-binge drinkers (HR 1.47, 95% CI: 0.85-2.54). In conclusion, liquor consumption and binge drinking was associated with increased risk of VTE, whereas wine consumption was possibly associated with reduced risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
21614415 View in PubMed
Less detail

Emotional states and future risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127168
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2012 Mar;107(3):485-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Kristin F Enga
Sigrid K Brækkan
Ida J Hansen-Krone
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hematological Research Group (HERG), Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. kristin.f.enga@uit.no
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2012 Mar;107(3):485-93
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depression - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Emotions - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Abstract
Emotional states of depression and loneliness are reported to be associated with higher risk and optimism with lower risk of arterial cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death. The relation between emotional states and risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been explored previously. We aimed to investigate the associations between self-reported emotional states and risk of incident VTE in a population-based, prospective study. The frequency of feeling depressed, lonely and happy/optimistic were registered by self-administered questionnaires, along with major co-morbidities and lifestyle habits, in 25,964 subjects aged 25-96 years, enrolled in the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995. Incident VTE-events were registered from the date of inclusion until September 1, 2007. There were 440 incident VTE-events during a median of 12.4 years of follow-up. Subjects who often felt depressed had 1.6-fold (95% CI:1.02-2.50) higher risk of VTE compared to those not depressed in analyses adjusted for other risk factors (age, sex , body mass index, oestrogens), lifestyle (smoking, alcohol consumption, educational level) and co-morbidities (diabetes, CVD, and cancer). Often feeling lonely was not associated with VTE. However, the incidence rate of VTE in subjects who concurrently felt often lonely and depressed was higher than for depression alone (age-and sex-adjusted incidence rate: 3.27 vs. 2.21). Oppositely, subjects who often felt happy/optimistic had 40% reduced risk of VTE (HR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.41-0.87). Our findings suggest that self-reported emotional states are associated with risk of VTE. Depressive feelings were associated with increased risk, while happiness/optimism was associated with reduced risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
22318455 View in PubMed
Less detail

Heart healthy diet and risk of myocardial infarction and venous thromboembolism. The Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123041
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2012 Sep;108(3):554-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Ida J Hansen-Krone
Kristin F Enga
Inger Njølstad
John-Bjarne Hansen
Sigrid K Braekkan
Author Affiliation
Hematological Research Group, Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. ida.j.hansen-krone@uit.no
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2012 Sep;108(3):554-60
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Body mass index
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats
Dietary Fiber
Female
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Habits
Humans
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Milk
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk
Risk Reduction Behavior
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Vegetables
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Prudent dietary patterns are associated with reduced risk of arterial cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Limited data exist on the relation between diet and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The aim of our prospective, population based study was to investigate the association of a heart healthy diet on risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and VTE. Information on dietary habits was available in 18,062 subjects, aged 25-69, who participated in the fourth Tromsø study, 1994-1995. Dietary patterns were assessed by a slightly modified version of the validated SmartDiet score; a 13-item questionnaire producing a diet score based on the intakes of fat, fibre, fruit and vegetables. Incident events of MI (n=518) and VTE (n=172) were recorded to the end of follow-up December 31, 2005 (median follow-up 10.8 years). Cox-regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR). A healthy diet score of >27 points (upper tertile) was associated with 17% reduced risk of MI (HR: 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66-1.06), and no association with VTE (HR: 1.01; 95%CI: 0.66-1.56), compared to
PubMed ID
22739999 View in PubMed
Less detail

High fish plus fish oil intake is associated with slightly reduced risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104487
Source
J Nutr. 2014 Jun;144(6):861-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Ida J Hansen-Krone
Kristin F Enga
Julie M Südduth-Klinger
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Tom Wilsgaard
Steven Watkins
Sigrid K Brækkan
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hematological Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
J Nutr. 2014 Jun;144(6):861-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Body mass index
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Dietary Supplements
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Fish Oils - administration & dosage
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Current knowledge of the effect of fish consumption on risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is scarce and diverging. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of fish consumption and fish oil supplements on the risk of VTE in a population-based cohort. Weekly intake of fish for dinner and intake of fish oil supplements during the previous year were registered in 23,621 persons aged 25-97 y who participated in the Tromsø Study from 1994 to 1995. Incident VTE events were registered throughout follow-up (31 December 2010). Cox-regression models were used to calculate HRs for VTE, adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, physical activity, and education level. During a median of 15.8 y of follow-up there were 536 incident VTE events. High fish consumption was associated with a slightly reduced risk of VTE. Participants who ate fish =3 times/wk had 22% lower risk of VTE than those who consumed fish 1-1.9 times/wk (multivariable HR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.60, 1.01; P = 0.06). The addition of fish oil supplements strengthened the inverse association with risk of VTE. Participants who consumed fish =3 times/wk who additionally used fish oil supplements had 48% lower risk than those who consumed fish 1-1.9 times/wk but did not use fish oil supplements (HR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.79; P = 0.002). In conclusion, a high weekly intake (=3 times/wk) of fish was associated with a slightly reduced risk of VTE, and the addition of fish oil supplements strengthened the inverse effect.
PubMed ID
24744307 View in PubMed
Less detail