Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Determinants of plasma PCB, brominated flame retardants, and organochlorine pesticides in pregnant women and 3 year old children in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273849
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Apr;146:136-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ida Henriette Caspersen
Helen Engelstad Kvalem
Margaretha Haugen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Cathrine Thomsen
May Frøshaug
Nanna Margrethe Bruun Bremnes
Sharon Lynn Broadwell
Berit Granum
Manolis Kogevinas
Helle Katrine Knutsen
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Apr;146:136-44
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Demography
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Flame Retardants - metabolism
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Brominated - blood
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Life Style
Norway
Pesticides - blood
Polybrominated Biphenyls - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Pregnancy
Abstract
Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) during prenatal and postnatal life has been extensively studied in relation to adverse health effects in children.
The aim was to identify determinants of the concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers, PBDEs; polybrominated biphenyl, PBB), and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in blood samples from pregnant women and children in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
Blood samples were collected from two independent subsamples within MoBa; a group of women (n=96) enrolled in mid-pregnancy during the years 2002-2008 and a group of 3 year old children (n=99) participating during 2010-2011. PCB congeners (74, 99, 138, 153, 180, 170, 194, 209, 105, 114, 118, 156, 157, 167, and 189), brominated flame retardants (PBDE-28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, and PBB-153), as well as the OCPs hexachlorobenzene (HCB), oxychlordane, 4,4'dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and 4,4'dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) were measured in both pregnant women and children.
Age, low parity, and low pre-pregnant BMI were the most important determinants of increased plasma concentrations of POPs in pregnant women. In 3 year old children, prolonged breastfeeding duration was a major determinant of increased POP concentrations. Estimated dietary exposure to PCBs during pregnancy was positively associated with plasma concentrations in 3 year old children, but not in pregnant women. Plasma concentrations were approximately 40% higher in children compared to pregnant women.
Several factors associated with exposure and toxicokinetics, i.e. accumulation, excretion and transfer via breastmilk of POPs were the main predictors of POP levels in pregnant women and children. Diet, which is the main exposure source for these compounds in the general population, was found to predict PCB levels only among children. For the PBDEs, for which non-dietary sources are more important, toxicokinetic factors appeared to have less predictive impact.
PubMed ID
26749444 View in PubMed
Less detail

Maternal Iodine Intake and Offspring Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Results from a Large Prospective Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293042
Source
Nutrients. 2017 Nov 13; 9(11):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Nov-13-2017
Author
Marianne Hope Abel
Eivind Ystrom
Ida Henriette Caspersen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Heidi Aase
Liv Elin Torheim
Ragna Bugge Askeland
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Author Affiliation
Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 0456 Oslo, Norway. mariannehope.abel@fhi.no.
Source
Nutrients. 2017 Nov 13; 9(11):
Date
Nov-13-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Age Factors
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Child
Child Behavior
Dietary Supplements
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - deficiency
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Recommended dietary allowances
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Current knowledge about the relationship between mild to moderately inadequate maternal iodine intake and/or supplemental iodine on child neurodevelopment is sparse. Using information from 77,164 mother-child pairs in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, this study explored associations between maternal iodine intake and child attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis, registered in the Norwegian Patient Registry and maternally-reported child ADHD symptoms at eight years of age. Pregnant women reported food and supplement intakes by questionnaire in gestational week 22. In total, 1725 children (2.2%) were diagnosed with ADHD. In non-users of supplemental iodine (53,360 mothers), we found no association between iodine intake from food and risk of child ADHD diagnosis (p = 0.89), while low iodine from food (
Notes
Cites: Pediatrics. 2012 Jul;130(1):e152-8 PMID 22711729
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2013 Nov;27(6):553-63 PMID 23919580
Cites: J Neuroendocrinol. 2008 Oct;20(10):1101-14 PMID 18673409
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Apr;100(4):1630-8 PMID 25629356
Cites: Psychol Med. 1987 Feb;17(1):121-43 PMID 3554290
Cites: Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2015 Apr;3(4):286-95 PMID 25591468
Cites: Ann Nutr Metab. 2008;52(4):272-80 PMID 18645244
Cites: Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2016 Dec 9;56(16):2695-713 PMID 25880137
Cites: Ambul Pediatr. 2007 Jan-Feb;7(1 Suppl):73-81 PMID 17261486
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;43(2):434-42 PMID 24464188
Cites: Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2017 Nov;5(11):853-863 PMID 29030199
Cites: Nutrients. 2017 May 13;9(5):null PMID 28505075
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2017 Mar 05;3:CD011761 PMID 28260263
Cites: Matern Child Nutr. 2008 Jan;4(1):28-43 PMID 18171405
Cites: BJOG. 2014 Oct;121(11):1365-74 PMID 24605987
Cites: Thyroid. 2012 Feb;22(2):178-86 PMID 22175242
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2012 May;68(5):845-51 PMID 22189674
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Sep;104 Suppl 3:918S-23S PMID 27534632
Cites: Matern Child Nutr. 2008 Jan;4(1):14-27 PMID 18171404
Cites: Pediatrics. 2015 Apr;135(4):e994-1001 PMID 25733754
Cites: J Neurol Sci. 2007 Nov 15;262(1-2):15-26 PMID 17651757
Cites: J Nutr. 2012 Dec;142(12):2167-74 PMID 23077186
Cites: Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2011 Jun;74(6):762-8 PMID 21521276
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Apr 8;328(14):997-1001 PMID 8450877
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2017 Jan 17;17 (1):23 PMID 28095819
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2007 Dec;10(12A):1606-11 PMID 18053287
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Dec;89(12):6054-60 PMID 15579758
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2003 Sep;90(3):679-85 PMID 13129475
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2004 Jun;7(4):569-76 PMID 15153264
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;54(1):3-16 PMID 22963644
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Mar;63(3):347-54 PMID 18059417
Cites: Psychol Med. 2014 Jul;44(10):2223-9 PMID 24107258
Cites: Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2007;107(6):4-16 PMID 18379482
Cites: J Nutr. 2017 Jul;147(7):1314-1324 PMID 28515161
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2016 Apr;45(2):382-8 PMID 27063603
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Mar;28(2):221-32 PMID 24629863
Cites: Psychiatr Q. 2005 Winter;76(4):327-39 PMID 16217627
Cites: Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(2):146-54 PMID 17536192
Cites: JAMA Pediatr. 2015 Sep;169(9):838-45 PMID 26146876
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Jun;79(6):435-9 PMID 10857866
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2009 Nov;23(6):597-608 PMID 19840297
PubMed ID
29137191 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patterns and dietary determinants of essential and toxic elements in blood measured in mid-pregnancy: The Norwegian Environmental Biobank.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301318
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Jun 25; 671:299-308
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-25-2019
Author
Ida Henriette Caspersen
Cathrine Thomsen
Line Småstuen Haug
Helle K Knutsen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Eleni Papadopoulou
Iris Erlund
Thomas Lundh
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: ida.henriette.caspersen@fhi.no.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Jun 25; 671:299-308
Date
Jun-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Specimen Banks
Blood Chemical Analysis
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Iron - deficiency
Life Style
Norway
Pregnancy
Socioeconomic Factors
Trace Elements - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Inadequate stores or intakes of essential minerals in pregnancy, or too high exposure to both toxic and essential elements, can have adverse effects on mother and child. The main aims of this study were to 1) describe the concentrations and patterns of essential and toxic elements measured in maternal whole blood during pregnancy; 2) identify dietary, lifestyle and sociodemographic determinants of element status; and 3) explore the impact of iron deficiency on blood element concentrations.
This study is based on blood samples collected from 2982 women in gestational week 18 in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study (MoBa) which were analyzed as part of the Norwegian Environmental Biobank. We derived blood element patterns by exploratory factor analysis, and associations between blood element patterns and diet were explored using sparse partial least squares (sPLS) regression.
Blood concentrations were determined for the essential elements (in the order of most abundant) Zn?>?Cu?>?Se?>?Mn?>?Mo?>?Co, and the toxic metals Pb?>?As?>?Hg?>?Cd?>?Tl. The concentrations were in ranges that were similar to or sometimes more favorable than in other pregnant and non-pregnant European women. We identified two blood element patterns; one including Zn, Se and Mn and another including Hg and As. For the Zn-Se-Mn pattern, use of multimineral supplements was the most important dietary determinant, while a high score in the Hg-As pattern was mainly determined by seafood consumption. Concentrations of Mn, Cd and Co were significantly higher in women with iron deficiency (plasma ferritin?
PubMed ID
30928759 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prenatal mercury exposure, maternal seafood consumption and associations with child language at five years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290353
Source
Environ Int. 2018 01; 110:71-79
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Kristine Vejrup
Ragnhild Eek Brandlistuen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Katrine Knutsen
Ida Henriette Caspersen
Jan Alexander
Thomas Lundh
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Per Magnus
Margaretha Haugen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Postbox 4404, Nydalen, NO 0403 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: Kristine.Vejrup@fhi.no.
Source
Environ Int. 2018 01; 110:71-79
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Language Development Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Mercury - analysis - blood - toxicity
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Seafood - analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Methyl mercury (MeHg) is a well-known neurotoxin and evidence suggests that also low level exposure may affect prenatal neurodevelopment. Uncertainty exists as to whether the maternal MeHg burden in Norway might affect child neurodevelopment.
To evaluate the association between prenatal mercury exposure, maternal seafood consumption and child language and communication skills at age five.
The study sample comprised 38,581 mother-child pairs in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Maternal mercury blood concentration in gestational week 17 was analysed in a sub-sample of 2239 women. Prenatal mercury exposure from maternal diet was calculated from a validated FFQ answered in mid-pregnancy. Mothers reported children's language and communications skills at age five by a questionnaire including questions from the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ), the Speech and Language Assessment Scale (SLAS) and the Twenty Statements about Language-Related Difficulties (language 20). We performed linear regression analyses adjusting for maternal characteristics, nutritional status and socioeconomic factors.
Median maternal blood mercury concentration was 1.03µg/L, dietary mercury exposure was 0.15µg/kgbw/wk, and seafood intake was 217g/wk. Blood mercury concentrations were not associated with any language and communication scales. Increased dietary mercury exposure was significantly associated with improved SLAS scores when mothers had a seafood intake below 400g/wk in the adjusted analysis. Sibling matched analysis showed a small significant adverse association between those above the 90th percentile dietary mercury exposure and the SLAS scores. Maternal seafood intake during pregnancy was positively associated with the language and communication scales.
Low levels of prenatal mercury exposure were positively associated with language and communication skills at five years. However, the matched sibling analyses suggested an adverse association between mercury and child language skills in the highest exposure group. This indicates that prenatal low level mercury exposure still needs our attention.
PubMed ID
29089166 View in PubMed
Less detail