Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 2.

The appropriate and inappropriate use of child restraint seats in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154964
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2008 Sep;15(3):151-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
John Blair
Angeliki Perdios
Shelina Babul
Kevin Young
Janice Beckles
Ian Pike
Peter Cripton
Debbie Sasges
Krishore Mulpuri
Ediriweera Desapriya
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2008 Sep;15(3):151-6
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Equipment - standards - utilization
Infant, Newborn
Male
Manitoba
Abstract
The objective of this research was to describe the use and incorrect use of child restraint systems in Manitoba, Canada. In 2004, a team of inspectors made up of Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers and trained car seat technicians from the Manitoba child seat coalition conducted a descriptive survey of types and frequency of child restraint systems' incorrect use. The setting was 10 roadside inspection sites located around the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba. The subjects were parents and primary caregivers of children using child restraint systems. The main outcome measured was the reported appropriate use rate as determined by the compliance to safety standards for correct installation and use of child restraints. A total of 340 child restraint systems were assessed. The overall rate of incorrect use was 70%. The errors present in stage III systems (booster seats) are much lower than the errors present in stage I systems (rear-facing child safety seats) and stage II systems (forward-facing child safety seats). The data presented illustrate that incorrect use of child restraint systems in the province of Manitoba is a large problem and must be dealt with immediately in order to ensure child safety now and in the future. Community-wide information and enhanced enforcement campaigns, consisting of activities such as mass media, information and publicity, child restraint systems displays and special enforcement strategies (check points, dedicated law enforcement officials, alternative penalties) should be used to increase the correct use of child restraint systems. Failure to use child restraint systems properly can contribute to serious injury or death of a child.
PubMed ID
18821379 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of on-reserve road versus off-reserve road motor vehicle crashes in Saskatchewan, Canada: a case control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143631
Source
Asia Pac J Public Health. 2011 Nov;23(6):1005-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Ediriweera Desapriya
Takeo Fujiwara
Pamela Verma
Shelina Babul
Ian Pike
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Injury Research and Prevention Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada. edesap@cw.bc.ca
Source
Asia Pac J Public Health. 2011 Nov;23(6):1005-20
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Saskatchewan
Young Adult
Abstract
There is an overwhelmingly high incidence of severe injuries caused by motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) among Aboriginal Canadians as compared with the general population.
The authors obtained MVC data for a 3-year period, 2003-2005, from Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI) for collisions occurring on on-reserve roads (n = 1270) together with a randomly selected sample of MVCs from off-reserve roads (n = 1270) in Saskatchewan. They compared the collision characteristics using bivariate and multiple logistic regressions.
On-reserve MVCs were more likely to include multiple collisions and result in severe injuries than the off-reserve sample. A number of factors were significantly related to the increased risk of on-reserve collisions as compared with the reference group for each variable.
Factors from all 3 levels (human, environmental, and vehicle factors) are associated with on-reserve MVCs.
PubMed ID
20460293 View in PubMed
Less detail

Developing injury indicators for Canadian children and youth: a modified-Delphi approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142667
Source
Inj Prev. 2010 Jun;16(3):154-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Ian Pike
Shannon Piedt
Lynne Warda
Natalie Yanchar
Colin Macarthur
Shelina Babul
Alison K Macpherson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Inj Prev. 2010 Jun;16(3):154-60
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident Prevention - economics - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Delphi Technique
Family
Female
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Questionnaires
Wounds and Injuries - economics - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
To develop a set of national injury indicators for Canadian children and youth which will eventually be used to reflect and monitor identified prevention priorities.
The Canadian Injury Indicators Development Team brought together injury researchers, policy makers, and practitioners to develop injury indicators in the following areas: overall health services implications; motor vehicle occupant; sports, recreation, and leisure; violence; and trauma care, quality, and outcomes. A modified-Delphi process was used to establish a set of indicators that met evidence-based criteria, were useful, and that would prompt action. Each indicator was rated by 132 respondent injury experts and stakeholders on its usefulness and ability to prompt action to reduce injury among Canadian children and youth.
From an initial list of 51 indicators, a refined set of 34 indicators was established. Indicators were grouped into three categories related to: policies; risk and protective factors; and outcomes. Indicators related to motor vehicle injury were rated as most useful and most able to prompt action. Injury mortality rate and injury hospitalisation rate were also rated highly for both usefulness and ability to prompt action. Policy, violence, sport and recreation, and trauma indicators were all rated higher for usefulness, but somewhat lower for ability to prompt action.
Results suggest that a broad-based modified-Delphi process is an important first step in developing useful and relevant indicators for injury prevention activity focused on Canadian children and youth.
PubMed ID
20570983 View in PubMed
Less detail

Injury prevention in child death review: child pedestrian fatalities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137249
Source
Inj Prev. 2011 Feb;17 Suppl 1:i4-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Ediriweera Desapriya
Meridith Sones
Tansey Ramanzin
Sara Weinstein
Giulia Scime
Ian Pike
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Canada. edesap@cw.bc.ca
Source
Inj Prev. 2011 Feb;17 Suppl 1:i4-9
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality - prevention & control
Adolescent
Age Distribution
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child Mortality
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Social Class
Walking - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - ethnology - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
This article describes the epidemiology of child pedestrian fatalities in British Columbia using data generated by the province's Child Death Review Unit, to demonstrate the unique capacity of child death review to provide an ecological understanding of child mortality and catalyse evidence based, multi-level prevention strategies.
All child pedestrian fatalities in British Columbia from 1 January 1 2003 to 31 December 2008 were reviewed. Data on demographics, circumstance of injury, and risk factors related to the child, driver, vehicle, and physical environment were extracted. Frequency of sociodemographic variables and modifiable risk factors were calculated, followed by statistical comparisons against the general population for Aboriginal ancestry, gender, ethnicity, income assistance and driver violations using z and t tests.
Analysis of child pedestrian fatalities (n=33) found a significant overrepresentation of Aboriginal children (p=0.06), males (p
PubMed ID
21278097 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevention of baby-walker-related injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152638
Source
Lancet. 2009 Feb 14;373(9663):545
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2009
Author
Ediriweera Desapriya
Giulia Scime
Sayed Subzwari
Ian Pike
Source
Lancet. 2009 Feb 14;373(9663):545
Date
Feb-14-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Infant
Infant Equipment - adverse effects
Legislation as Topic
Wounds and Injuries - etiology - prevention & control
Notes
Comment On: Lancet. 2008 Dec 6;372(9654):200019059050
PubMed ID
19217989 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Oct 10;175(8):919-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-2006
Author
Ediriweera Desapriya
Ian Pike
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Oct 10;175(8):919-22
Date
Oct-10-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Diabetes Mellitus - diet therapy - prevention & control
Health promotion
Humans
Hypertension - ethnology - prevention & control
Indians, North American
Life Style
Social Conditions
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Feb 7;346(6):393-40311832527
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2000 Sep;45(7):607-1611056823
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Apr 25;174(9):1233, 123716636314
Cites: Monogr Soc Res Child Dev. 2003;68(2):vii-viii, 1-130; discussion 131-812951783
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2005 Jul;95(7):1238-4415933239
Comment On: CMAJ. 2006 Apr 25;174(9):1233, 123716636314
PubMed ID
17030943 View in PubMed
Less detail

The risk of injury and vehicle damage in vehicle mismatched crashes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171627
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2005 Sep;12(3):191-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):1392
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-2007
Author
Ediriweera Desapriya
Ian Pike
Giulia Scime
Sayed Subzwari
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):1392
Date
Nov-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Automobile Driver Examination
Automobile Driving
Canada
Dementia
Disability Evaluation
Finland
Humans
Risk assessment
Sweden
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Oct 4;274(13):10607563458
Cites: Accid Anal Prev. 2003 Sep;35(5):805-1012850082
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Sep 11;177(6):599-60117846442
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1996 Jun;44(6):650-38642154
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1997 Feb;45(2):202-69033520
Comment On: CMAJ. 2007 Sep 11;177(6):599-60117846442
PubMed ID
18025435 View in PubMed
Less detail

A systematic review of community interventions to improve Aboriginal child passenger safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104442
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Takuro Ishikawa
Eugenia Oudie
Ediriweera Desapriya
Kate Turcotte
Ian Pike
Author Affiliation
Takuro Ishikawa, Eugenia Oudie, Kate Turcotte, and Ian Pike are with, and Ediriweera Desapriya was with the BC Injury Research and Prevention Unit; the University of British Columbia; and the Child and Family Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e1-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Child
Child Restraint Systems - utilization
Community Health Planning
Cultural Characteristics
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Wounds and Injuries - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
We evaluated evidence of community interventions to improve Aboriginal child passenger safety (CPS) in terms of its scientific merit and cultural relevance. We included studies if they reported interventions to improve CPS in Aboriginal communities, compared at least pre- and postintervention conditions, and evaluated rates and severity of child passenger injuries, child restraint use, or knowledge of CPS. We also appraised quality and cultural relevance of studies. Study quality was associated with community participation and cultural relevance. Strong evidence showed that multicomponent interventions tailored to each community improves CPS. Interventions in Aboriginal communities should incorporate Aboriginal views of health, involve the community, and be multicomponent and tailored to the community's circumstances and culture.
PubMed ID
24754652 View in PubMed
Less detail

Using International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition, codes to estimate abusive head trauma in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122458
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2012 Aug;43(2):215-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Takeo Fujiwara
Ronald G Barr
Rollin F Brant
Fahra Rajabali
Ian Pike
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2012 Aug;43(2):215-20
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Child Abuse - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual
Humans
Incidence
Infant
International Classification of Diseases
Shaken Baby Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Passive surveillance using ICD codes for hospital discharges has been used to estimate the incidence of abusive head trauma (AHT) utilizing ICD-9-CM, but not ICD-10, codes. There have been no incidence estimates of AHT in Canada where ICD-10 codes have been used since 2002. The Discharge Abstract Database from the Canadian Institute of Health Information (CIHI) for 2002-2007 was used for analyses conducted in 2011. A case was defined by code combinations that indexed injury specificity (narrow or broad) and degree of certainty (presumptive or probable) that the injury was inflicted. Estimated incidences for the populations at risk in those aged
PubMed ID
22813688 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.