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Adapting to the effects of climate change on Inuit health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104452
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e9-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
James D Ford
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Susan Chatwood
Christopher Furgal
Sherilee Harper
Ian Mauro
Tristan Pearce
Author Affiliation
James D. Ford is with the Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. Ashlee Cunsolo Willox is with the Department of Community Health, Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia. Susan Chatwood is with the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Christopher Furgal is with the Department of Indigenous Environmental Studies, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario. Sherilee Harper is with the Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Ontario. Ian Mauro is with the Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Tristan Pearce is with the University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydor, Queensland, Australia.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:e9-17
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate change
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Climate change will have far-reaching implications for Inuit health. Focusing on adaptation offers a proactive approach for managing climate-related health risks-one that views Inuit populations as active agents in planning and responding at household, community, and regional levels. Adaptation can direct attention to the root causes of climate vulnerability and emphasize the importance of traditional knowledge regarding environmental change and adaptive strategies. An evidence base on adaptation options and processes for Inuit regions is currently lacking, however, thus constraining climate policy development. In this article, we tackled this deficit, drawing upon our understanding of the determinants of health vulnerability to climate change in Canada to propose key considerations for adaptation decision-making in an Inuit context.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24754615 View in PubMed
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Approaching Etuaptmumk - introducing a consensus-based mixed method for health services research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263112
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27438
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Susan Chatwood
Francois Paulette
Ross Baker
Astrid Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Heidi Eriksen
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Josée Lavoie
Wendy Lou
Ian Mauro
James Orbinski
Nathalie Pabrum
Hanna Retallack
Adalsteinn Brown
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27438
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
With the recognized need for health systems' improvements in the circumpolar and indigenous context, there has been a call to expand the research agenda across all sectors influencing wellness and to recognize academic and indigenous knowledge through the research process. Despite being recognized as a distinct body of knowledge in international forums and across indigenous groups, examples of methods and theories based on indigenous knowledge are not well documented in academic texts or peer-reviewed literature on health systems. This paper describes the use of a consensus-based, mixed method with indigenous knowledge by an experienced group of researchers and indigenous knowledge holders who collaborated on a study that explored indigenous values underlying health systems stewardship. The method is built on the principles of Etuaptmumk or two-eyed seeing, which aim to respond to and resolve the inherent conflicts between indigenous ways of knowing and the scientific inquiry that informs the evidence base in health care. Mixed methods' frameworks appear to provide a framing suitable for research questions that require data from indigenous knowledge sources and western knowledge. The nominal consensus method, as a western paradigm, was found to be responsive to embedding of indigenous knowledge and allowed space to express multiple perspectives and reach consensus on the question at hand. Further utilization and critical evaluation of this mixed methodology with indigenous knowledge are required.
PubMed ID
26004427 View in PubMed
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Community-based adaptation research in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276482
Source
Wiley Interdiscip Rev Clim Change. 2016 Mar-Apr;7(2):175-191
Publication Type
Article
Author
James D Ford
Ellie Stephenson
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Victoria Edge
Khosrow Farahbakhsh
Christopher Furgal
Sherilee Harper
Susan Chatwood
Ian Mauro
Tristan Pearce
Stephanie Austin
Anna Bunce
Alejandra Bussalleu
Jahir Diaz
Kaitlyn Finner
Allan Gordon
Catherine Huet
Knut Kitching
Marie-Pierre Lardeau
Graham McDowell
Ellen McDonald
Lesya Nakoneczny
Mya Sherman
Source
Wiley Interdiscip Rev Clim Change. 2016 Mar-Apr;7(2):175-191
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Community-based adaptation (CBA) has emerged over the last decade as an approach to empowering communities to plan for and cope with the impacts of climate change. While such approaches have been widely advocated, few have critically examined the tensions and challenges that CBA brings. Responding to this gap, this article critically examines the use of CBA approaches with Inuit communities in Canada. We suggest that CBA holds significant promise to make adaptation research more democratic and responsive to local needs, providing a basis for developing locally appropriate adaptations based on local/indigenous and Western knowledge. Yet, we argue that CBA is not a panacea, and its common portrayal as such obscures its limitations, nuances, and challenges. Indeed, if uncritically adopted, CBA can potentially lead to maladaptation, may be inappropriate in some instances, can legitimize outside intervention and control, and may further marginalize communities. We identify responsibilities for researchers engaging in CBA work to manage these challenges, emphasizing the centrality of how knowledge is generated, the need for project flexibility and openness to change, and the importance of ensuring partnerships between researchers and communities are transparent. Researchers also need to be realistic about what CBA can achieve, and should not assume that research has a positive role to play in community adaptation just because it utilizes participatory approaches. WIREs Clim Change 2016, 7:175-191. doi: 10.1002/wcc.376 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.
PubMed ID
27668014 View in PubMed
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Indigenous Values and Health Systems Stewardship in Circumpolar Countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292205
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 11 27; 14(12):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-27-2017
Author
Susan Chatwood
Francois Paulette
G Ross Baker
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Heidi Eriksen
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Josée Lavoie
Wendy Lou
Ian Mauro
James Orbinski
Nathalie Pambrun
Hanna Retallack
Adalsteinn Brown
Author Affiliation
Institute for Circumpolar Health Research, Yellowknife, NT X1A 3X7, Canada. chatwood@ualberta.ca.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 11 27; 14(12):
Date
11-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cultural Competency
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Policy Making
Population Groups
Abstract
Circumpolar regions, and the nations within which they reside, have recently gained international attention because of shared and pressing public policy issues such as climate change, resource development, endangered wildlife and sovereignty disputes. In a call for national and circumpolar action on shared areas of concern, the Arctic states health ministers recently met and signed a declaration that identified shared priorities for international cooperation. Among the areas for collaboration raised, the declaration highlighted the importance of enhancing intercultural understanding, promoting culturally appropriate health care delivery and strengthening circumpolar collaboration in culturally appropriate health care delivery. This paper responds to the opportunity for further study to fully understand indigenous values and contexts, and presents these as they may apply to a framework that will support international comparisons and systems improvements within circumpolar regions. We explored the value base of indigenous peoples and provide considerations on how these values might interface with national values, health systems values and value bases between indigenous nations particularly in the context of health system policy-making that is inevitably shared between indigenous communities and jurisdictional or federal governments. Through a mixed methods nominal consensus process, nine values were identified and described: humanity, cultural responsiveness, teaching, nourishment, community voice, kinship, respect, holism and empowerment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29186925 View in PubMed
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Indigenous Values and Health Systems Stewardship in Circumpolar Countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287164
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Nov 27;14(12)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-2017
Author
Susan Chatwood
Francois Paulette
G Ross Baker
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Heidi Eriksen
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Josée Lavoie
Wendy Lou
Ian Mauro
James Orbinski
Nathalie Pambrun
Hanna Retallack
Adalsteinn Brown
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Nov 27;14(12)
Date
Nov-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Circumpolar regions, and the nations within which they reside, have recently gained international attention because of shared and pressing public policy issues such as climate change, resource development, endangered wildlife and sovereignty disputes. In a call for national and circumpolar action on shared areas of concern, the Arctic states health ministers recently met and signed a declaration that identified shared priorities for international cooperation. Among the areas for collaboration raised, the declaration highlighted the importance of enhancing intercultural understanding, promoting culturally appropriate health care delivery and strengthening circumpolar collaboration in culturally appropriate health care delivery. This paper responds to the opportunity for further study to fully understand indigenous values and contexts, and presents these as they may apply to a framework that will support international comparisons and systems improvements within circumpolar regions. We explored the value base of indigenous peoples and provide considerations on how these values might interface with national values, health systems values and value bases between indigenous nations particularly in the context of health system policy-making that is inevitably shared between indigenous communities and jurisdictional or federal governments. Through a mixed methods nominal consensus process, nine values were identified and described: humanity, cultural responsiveness, teaching, nourishment, community voice, kinship, respect, holism and empowerment.
PubMed ID
29186925 View in PubMed
Less detail