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Cancer follow-up care in New Brunswick: cancer surveillance, support issues and fear of recurrence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176905
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2004;9(2):101-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Baukje Maiedema
Sue Tatemichi
Ian MacDonald
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University Family Medicine Teaching Unit, Dr. Everett Chalmers Regional Hopital, Fredericton, NB.
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2004;9(2):101-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aftercare
Aged
Fear
Female
Focus Groups
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - psychology
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
New Brunswick
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family
Rural Population
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to find out, from the patient's perspective and using qualitative methodology, how cancer follow-up care is managed in a New Brunswick health region. From focus group discussions with 23 participants 1-year post-cancer diagnosis, 3 prominent themes emerged: fear of recurrence, cancer surveillance/testing and support issues. The fear of recurrence permeates day-to-day life for many patients. To allay these fears, some patients feel a need to be subjected to extensive cancer surveillance. Emotional support, which is important for survivors, is complex. The majority of the participants in this study received cancer follow-up care from specialists. More rural than urban participants received their follow-up care from their family physicians (FPs). Participants had high expectations for follow-up care, regardless of which type of physician--specialist or FP--provided it. If physicians did not provide the level and intensity of care expected by their patients, they were considered uncaring. We advocate a "transition of care" or "shared care" protocol between the acute cancer treatment provider and the FP, particularly in rural areas. This would ensure that cancer patients have a clear understanding of where to turn for ongoing surveillance, when they fear cancer recurrence or need support. For optimized cancer follow-up care, physicians must be cognizant that careful emotional and clinical management over an indefinite period of time is required, and they must recognize the individual needs of each patient.
PubMed ID
15607038 View in PubMed
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Cancer follow-up care. Patients' perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184172
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2003 Jul;49:890-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Baukje Miedema
Ian MacDonald
Sue Tatemichi
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University Family Medicine Teaching Unit, Dr Everett Chalmers Regional Hospital, Fredericton, NB. bmiedema@health.nb.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2003 Jul;49:890-5
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Emotions
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Medical Oncology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
New Brunswick
Patient satisfaction
Physicians, Family
Quality of Health Care
Social Support
Abstract
To assess family physicians' and specialists' involvement in cancer follow-up care and how this involvement is perceived by cancer patients.
Self-administered survey.
A health region in New Brunswick.
A nonprobability cluster sample of 183 participants.
Patients' perceptions of cancer follow-up care.
More than a third of participants (36%) were not sure which physician was in charge of their cancer follow-up care. As part of follow-up care, 80% of participants wanted counseling from their family physicians, but only 20% received it. About a third of participants (32%) were not satisfied with the follow-up care provided by their family physicians. In contrast, only 18% of participants were dissatisfied with the follow-up care provided by specialists. Older participants were more satisfied with cancer follow-up care than younger participants.
Cancer follow-up care is increasingly becoming part of family physicians' practices. Family physicians need to develop an approach that addresses patients' needs, particularly in the area of emotional support.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12901486 View in PubMed
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Drug management for hypertension in type 2 diabetes in family practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149670
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2009 Jul;55(7):728-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Wayne Putnam
Farokh Buhariwalla
Kendrick Lacey
Mary Goodfellow
Rose Anne Goodine
Jennifer Hall
Ian Macdonald
Michael Murray
Preston Smith
Fred Burge
Nandini Natarajan
Beverley Lawson
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 2E2. wayne.putnam@dal.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2009 Jul;55(7):728-34
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To describe the number and classes of antihypertensive medications prescribed to patients with type 2 diabetes in community family practices, and to estimate the aggressiveness or "dosage intensity" of prescribing for hypertension in these situations.
Practice-based, cross-sectional observational study.
Seventeen rural and urban family practices in the Maritime Family Practice Research Network in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island.
A total of 670 patients with type 2 diabetes, ranging from 25 to 92 years of age.
Number, classes, and combinations of classes of antihypertensive medications prescribed, as well as an index of each medication's dosage intensity.
Almost 80% of patients studied had hypertension. Participants with hypertension were taking an average of 2.5 medications, and 47.6% were taking 3 or more antihypertensive medications, but only 27.1% reached target blood pressure values of less than 130/80 mm Hg. Older patients took more antihypertensive medications, but there were no differences by sex. More than 90% were taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, 66% were taking diuretics, 41% were taking beta-blockers, and 38% were taking calcium channel blockers. We cannot describe the sequence in which antihypertensive medication classes were added, but analysis of patients taking multiple drug classes suggests that most patients were started on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, followed by diuretics, beta-blockers, or calcium channel blockers. The most commonly used medications were prescribed at higher than two-thirds the maximum dose effective for hypertension.
Hypertension is very common among family practice patients with type 2 diabetes; of those patients, few reach target blood pressures. Practice-based strategies to increase dosing and number of medications prescribed might be required.
Notes
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Erratum In: Can Fam Physician. 2010 Mar;56(3):224
PubMed ID
19602663 View in PubMed
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Evidence of genetic heterogeneity in Alberta Hutterites with Usher syndrome type I.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123521
Source
Mol Vis. 2012;18:1379-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Qi Zhou
Chaeli Lenger
Richard Smith
William J Kimberling
Ming Ye
Ordan Lehmann
Ian MacDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
Source
Mol Vis. 2012;18:1379-83
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta
Cadherins - genetics
Child
Ethnic Groups - genetics
Exons
Female
Genetic Heterogeneity
Genetic Linkage
Genotype
Homozygote
Humans
Male
Myosins - genetics
Pedigree
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Siblings
Usher Syndromes - genetics - pathology
Abstract
To identify the genetic defect in a Hutterite population from northern Alberta with Usher syndrome type I.
Complete ophthalmic examinations were conducted on two boys and two girls from two related Hutterite families diagnosed with Usher syndrome type I. DNA from patients and their parents was first evaluated for a mutation in exon 10 of the protocadherin-related 15 (PCDH15) gene (c.1471delG), previously reported in southern Alberta Hutterite patients with Usher syndrome (USH1F). Single nucleotide polymorphic linkage analysis was then used to confirm another locus, and DNA was analyzed with the Usher Chip v4.0 platform.
Severe hearing impairment, unintelligible speech, and retinitis pigmentosa with varying degrees of visual acuity and visual field loss established a clinical diagnosis of Usher syndrome type I. The patients did not carry the exon 10 mutation in the PCDH15 gene; however, with microarray analysis, a previously reported mutation (c.52C>T; p.Q18X) in the myosin VIIA (MYO7A) gene was found in the homozygous state in the affected siblings.
The finding of a MYO7A mutation in two related Hutterite families from northern Alberta provides evidence of genetic heterogeneity in Hutterites affected by Usher syndrome type I.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22690115 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Dec;54(12):1680-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Ian MacDonald
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Dec;54(12):1680-1
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Humans
Immunization Programs - organization & administration
Infection Control - methods
Vaccination - standards
PubMed ID
19074703 View in PubMed
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Low vision service models in Alberta: innovation, collaboration, and future opportunities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168870
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2006 Jun;41(3):373-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Kate Harper
Catharine McFee
Ian Macdonald
Marilyn Jones
Author Affiliation
Canadian National Institute for the Blind, Calgary, AB.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2006 Jun;41(3):373-7
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Models, organizational
Vision, Low - rehabilitation
Visually Impaired Persons - rehabilitation
Abstract
As Alberta's population ages over the next 20 years, the number of older adults experiencing age-related blindness or vision loss is likely to at least double. To prevent a crisis in low vision service provision, we need to build upon, and extend, existing partnerships between the CNIB and ophthalmologists, optometrists, government policy makers, and other service providers. Future service models for low vision rehabilitation should also emphasize interventions such as counselling and peer support that enhance quality of life. With thoughtful planning, adequate funding, and involvement of all stakeholders, Alberta has the potential to become a world leader in the field of low vision treatment and rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
16767196 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.