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Social functioning of patients with schizophrenia in high-income welfare societies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52507
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2000 Feb;51(2):223-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
I. Melle
S. Friis
E. Hauff
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department of Research and Education of the Division of Psychiatry, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2000 Feb;51(2):223-8
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Chronic Disease
Developed Countries - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Schizophrenia - rehabilitation
Social Adjustment
Social Isolation
Social Welfare
Unemployment
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The study assessed the level of reintegration into the community of patients with schizophrenia in Oslo, Norway, a country with a well-developed social welfare system and low unemployment rates. METHODS: Eighty-one patients with a DSM-III-R diagnosis of schizophrenia treated in 1980 and in 1983 in a short-term ward of a psychiatric hospital were followed up after seven years. Seventy-four of 76 patients alive at follow-up agreed to participate. Social functioning was measured by the Strauss-Carpenter Level of Functioning Scale and the Social Adjustment Scale. RESULTS: At follow-up 78 percent of patients lived independently, 47 percent were socially isolated, and 94 percent were unemployed. Thirty-four percent had lost employment in the follow-up period. A poor outcome in terms of social functioning and community reintegration was associated with loss of employment. A good outcome was predicted by short periods of inpatient hospitalization, high levels of education, being married, male gender, and not having a late onset of psychosis. CONCLUSIONS: The level of homelessness among these patients with schizophrenia was encouragingly low, which may have been expected in a high-income welfare society. However, insufficient efforts were aimed at social and instrumental rehabilitation, and the level of unemployment was alarmingly high.
PubMed ID
10655007 View in PubMed
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Assessment of social anxiety in first episode psychosis using the Liebowitz Social Anxiety scale as a self-report measure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139685
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2011 Mar;26(2):115-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
K L Romm
J I Rossberg
A O Berg
C F Hansen
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
Author Affiliation
Psychosis Research Unit, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, 0407 Oslo, Norway. k.l.romm@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2011 Mar;26(2):115-21
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Phobic Disorders - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Self Concept
Self Report - standards
Social Environment
Social Isolation
Young Adult
Abstract
Social anxiety is a common problem in psychotic disorders. The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, Self-Rating version (LSAS-SR) is a widely used instrument to capture different aspects of social anxiety, but its psychometric properties have not been tested in this patient group. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the psychometric properties of the LSAS-SR in patients with first episode psychosis, to investigate whether it differentiated between active and passive social withdrawal and to test which clinical factors contributed to current level of social anxiety.
A total of 144 first episode psychosis patients from the ongoing Thematically Organized Psychosis (TOP) study were included at the time of first treatment. Diagnoses were set according to the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-1) for DSM-IV. A factor analysis was carried out and the relationship of social anxiety to psychotic and general symptomatology measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was evaluated. Possible contributors to social anxiety were analyzed using multiple hierarchic regression analysis.
The factor analysis identified three subscales: public performance, social interaction and observation. All three subscales showed satisfactory psychometric properties, acceptable convergent and discriminate properties, and confirmed previous findings in social anxiety samples. Self-esteem explained a significant amount of the variance in social anxiety, even after adjusting for the effects of delusions, suspiciousness and depression.
The study shows that the LSAS-SR can be used in this patient group, that social anxiety is strongly related to both behavioral social avoidance and to self-esteem. The results support the use of this measure in assessment of social anxiety in both clinical settings and in research.
PubMed ID
21036553 View in PubMed
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