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A 2-year follow-up of involuntary admission's influence upon adherence and outcome in first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145997
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
S. Opjordsmoen
S. Friis
I. Melle
U. Haahr
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
E. Simonsen
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. o.s.e.ilner@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To see, if voluntary admission for treatment in first-episode psychosis results in better adherence to treatment and more favourable outcome than involuntary admission.
We compared consecutively first-admitted, hospitalised patients from a voluntary (n = 91) with an involuntary (n = 126) group as to psychopathology and functioning using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning Scales at baseline, after 3 months and at 2 year follow-up. Moreover, duration of supportive psychotherapy, medication and number of hospitalisations during the 2 years were measured.
More women than men were admitted involuntarily. Voluntary patients had less psychopathology and better functioning than involuntary patients at baseline. No significant difference as to duration of psychotherapy and medication between groups was found. No significant difference was found as to psychopathology and functioning between voluntarily and involuntarily admitted patients at follow-up.
Legal admission status per se did not seem to influence treatment adherence and outcome.
PubMed ID
20085554 View in PubMed
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No progressive brain changes during a 1-year follow-up of patients with first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276617
Source
Psychol Med. 2016 Feb;46(3):589-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
U K Haukvik
C B Hartberg
S. Nerland
K N Jørgensen
E H Lange
C. Simonsen
R. Nesvåg
A M Dale
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
I. Agartz
Source
Psychol Med. 2016 Feb;46(3):589-98
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Bipolar Disorder - drug therapy - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Cerebral Cortex - pathology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychotic Disorders - drug therapy - pathology
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
First-episode psychosis (FEP) patients show structural brain abnormalities. Whether the changes are progressive or not remain under debate, and the results from longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are mixed. We investigated if FEP patients showed a different pattern of regional brain structural change over a 1-year period compared with healthy controls, and if putative changes correlated with clinical characteristics and outcome.
MRIs of 79 FEP patients [SCID-I-verified diagnoses: schizophrenia, psychotic bipolar disorder, or other psychoses, mean age 27.6 (s.d. = 7.7) years, 66% male] and 82 healthy controls [age 29.3 (s.d. = 7.2) years, 66% male] were acquired from the same 1.5 T scanner at baseline and 1-year follow-up as part of the Thematically Organized Psychosis (TOP) study, Oslo, Norway. Scans were automatically processed with the longitudinal stream in FreeSurfer that creates an unbiased within-subject template image. General linear models were used to analyse longitudinal change in a wide range of subcortical volumes and detailed thickness and surface area estimates across the entire cortex, and associations with clinical characteristics.
FEP patients and controls did not differ significantly in annual percentage change in cortical thickness or area in any cortical region, or in any of the subcortical structures after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Within the FEP group, duration of untreated psychosis, age at illness onset, antipsychotic medication use and remission at follow-up were not related to longitudinal brain change.
We found no significant longitudinal brain changes over a 1-year period in FEP patients. Our results do not support early progressive brain changes in psychotic disorders.
PubMed ID
26526001 View in PubMed
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Early detection strategies for untreated first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71893
Source
Schizophr Res. 2001 Aug 1;51(1):39-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2001
Author
J O Johannessen
T H McGlashan
T K Larsen
M. Horneland
I. Joa
S. Mardal
R. Kvebaek
S. Friis
I. Melle
S. Opjordsmoen
E. Simonsen
H. Ulrik
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Rogaland Psychiatric Hospital, P.O. Box 1163, Hillevåg, 4095, Stavanger, Norway. joj@rps.no
Source
Schizophr Res. 2001 Aug 1;51(1):39-46
Date
Aug-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Denmark
Ethics, Medical
Female
Health education
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy
Referral and Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy
Schizotypal Personality Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy
Abstract
Some studies in first-episode schizophrenia correlate shorter duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) with better prognosis, suggesting that timing of treatment may be important. A three-site prospective clinical trial in Norway and Denmark is underway to investigate the effect of the timing of treatment in first-episode psychosis. One health care sector (Rogaland, Norway) is experimental and has developed an early detection (ED) system to reduce DUP. Two other sectors (Ullevål, Norway, and Roskilde, Denmark) are comparison sectors and rely on existing detection and referral systems for first-episode cases. The study ultimately will compare early detected with usual detected patients. This paper describes the study's major independent intervention variable, i.e. a comprehensive education and detection system to change DUP in first onset psychosis.System variables and first results from the four-year inclusion period (1997-2000) are described. It includes targeted information towards the general public, health professionals and schools, and ED teams to recruit appropriate patients into treatment as soon as possible. This plus easy access to psychiatric services via ED teams systematically changed referral patterns of first-episode schizophrenia. DUP was reduced by 1.5 years (mean) from before the time the ED system was instituted (to 0.5 years). The ED strategies appear to be effective and to influence directly the community's help-seeking behaviour.
PubMed ID
11479064 View in PubMed
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Polymorphisms in SREBF1 and SREBF2, two antipsychotic-activated transcription factors controlling cellular lipogenesis, are associated with schizophrenia in German and Scandinavian samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154634
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2010 May;15(5):463-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
S. Le Hellard
T W Mühleisen
S. Djurovic
J. Fernø
Z. Ouriaghi
M. Mattheisen
C. Vasilescu
M B Raeder
T. Hansen
J. Strohmaier
A. Georgi
F F Brockschmidt
I. Melle
I. Nenadic
H. Sauer
M. Rietschel
M M Nöthen
T. Werge
O A Andreassen
S. Cichon
V M Steen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen Mental Health Research Center, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. stephanie.le.hellard@helse-bergen.no
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2010 May;15(5):463-72
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17 - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22 - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Germany
Humans
Lipogenesis - drug effects - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Scandinavia
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - genetics
Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 - genetics
Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 2 - genetics
Abstract
Several studies have reported structural brain abnormalities, decreased myelination and oligodendrocyte dysfunction in schizophrenia. In the central nervous system, glia-derived de novo synthesized cholesterol is essential for both myelination and synaptogenesis. Previously, we demonstrated in glial cell lines that antipsychotic drugs induce the expression of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acids biosynthesis through activation of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors, encoded by the sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1) and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBF2) genes. Considering the importance of these factors in the lipid biosynthesis and their possible involvement in antipsychotic drug effects, we hypothesized that genetic variants of SREBF1 and/or SREBF2 could affect schizophrenia susceptibility. We therefore conducted a HapMap-based association study in a large German sample, and identified association between schizophrenia and five markers in SREBF1 and five markers in SREBF2. Follow-up studies in two independent samples of Danish and Norwegian origin (part of the Scandinavian collaboration of psychiatric etiology study, SCOPE) replicated the association for the five SREBF1 markers and for two markers in SREBF2. A combined analysis of all samples resulted in highly significant genotypic P-values of 9 x 10(-4) for SREBF1 (rs11868035, odd ration (OR)=1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.09-1.45)) and 4 x 10(-5) for SREBF2 (rs1057217, OR=1.39, 95% CI (1.19-1.63)). This finding strengthens the hypothesis that SREBP-controlled cholesterol biosynthesis is involved in the etiology of schizophrenia.
PubMed ID
18936756 View in PubMed
Less detail