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A 2-year follow-up of involuntary admission's influence upon adherence and outcome in first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145997
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
S. Opjordsmoen
S. Friis
I. Melle
U. Haahr
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
E. Simonsen
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. o.s.e.ilner@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To see, if voluntary admission for treatment in first-episode psychosis results in better adherence to treatment and more favourable outcome than involuntary admission.
We compared consecutively first-admitted, hospitalised patients from a voluntary (n = 91) with an involuntary (n = 126) group as to psychopathology and functioning using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning Scales at baseline, after 3 months and at 2 year follow-up. Moreover, duration of supportive psychotherapy, medication and number of hospitalisations during the 2 years were measured.
More women than men were admitted involuntarily. Voluntary patients had less psychopathology and better functioning than involuntary patients at baseline. No significant difference as to duration of psychotherapy and medication between groups was found. No significant difference was found as to psychopathology and functioning between voluntarily and involuntarily admitted patients at follow-up.
Legal admission status per se did not seem to influence treatment adherence and outcome.
PubMed ID
20085554 View in PubMed
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Early detection strategies for untreated first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71893
Source
Schizophr Res. 2001 Aug 1;51(1):39-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2001
Author
J O Johannessen
T H McGlashan
T K Larsen
M. Horneland
I. Joa
S. Mardal
R. Kvebaek
S. Friis
I. Melle
S. Opjordsmoen
E. Simonsen
H. Ulrik
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Rogaland Psychiatric Hospital, P.O. Box 1163, Hillevåg, 4095, Stavanger, Norway. joj@rps.no
Source
Schizophr Res. 2001 Aug 1;51(1):39-46
Date
Aug-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Denmark
Ethics, Medical
Female
Health education
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy
Referral and Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy
Schizotypal Personality Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy
Abstract
Some studies in first-episode schizophrenia correlate shorter duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) with better prognosis, suggesting that timing of treatment may be important. A three-site prospective clinical trial in Norway and Denmark is underway to investigate the effect of the timing of treatment in first-episode psychosis. One health care sector (Rogaland, Norway) is experimental and has developed an early detection (ED) system to reduce DUP. Two other sectors (Ullevål, Norway, and Roskilde, Denmark) are comparison sectors and rely on existing detection and referral systems for first-episode cases. The study ultimately will compare early detected with usual detected patients. This paper describes the study's major independent intervention variable, i.e. a comprehensive education and detection system to change DUP in first onset psychosis.System variables and first results from the four-year inclusion period (1997-2000) are described. It includes targeted information towards the general public, health professionals and schools, and ED teams to recruit appropriate patients into treatment as soon as possible. This plus easy access to psychiatric services via ED teams systematically changed referral patterns of first-episode schizophrenia. DUP was reduced by 1.5 years (mean) from before the time the ED system was instituted (to 0.5 years). The ED strategies appear to be effective and to influence directly the community's help-seeking behaviour.
PubMed ID
11479064 View in PubMed
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Early identification of non-remission in first-episode psychosis in a two-year outcome study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141450
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Nov;122(5):375-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Erik Simonsen
S. Friis
S. Opjordsmoen
E L Mortensen
U. Haahr
I. Melle
I. Joa
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Unit, Zealand Region Psychiatry Roskilde, Roskilde University and University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. es@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Nov;122(5):375-83
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Remission Induction
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Statistics, nonparametric
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify predictors of non-remission in first-episode, non-affective psychosis.
During 4 years, we recruited 301 patients consecutively. Information about first remission at 3 months was available for 299 and at 2 years for 293 cases. Symptomatic and social outcomes were assessed at 3 months, 1 and 2 years.
One hundred and twenty-nine patients (43%) remained psychotic at 3 months and 48 patients (16.4%) remained psychotic over 2 years. When we compared premorbid and baseline data for the three groups, the non-remitted (n = 48), remitted for
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2011 Jun;123(6):49421219270
PubMed ID
20722632 View in PubMed
Less detail