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No progressive brain changes during a 1-year follow-up of patients with first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276617
Source
Psychol Med. 2016 Feb;46(3):589-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
U K Haukvik
C B Hartberg
S. Nerland
K N Jørgensen
E H Lange
C. Simonsen
R. Nesvåg
A M Dale
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
I. Agartz
Source
Psychol Med. 2016 Feb;46(3):589-98
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Bipolar Disorder - drug therapy - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Cerebral Cortex - pathology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychotic Disorders - drug therapy - pathology
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
First-episode psychosis (FEP) patients show structural brain abnormalities. Whether the changes are progressive or not remain under debate, and the results from longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are mixed. We investigated if FEP patients showed a different pattern of regional brain structural change over a 1-year period compared with healthy controls, and if putative changes correlated with clinical characteristics and outcome.
MRIs of 79 FEP patients [SCID-I-verified diagnoses: schizophrenia, psychotic bipolar disorder, or other psychoses, mean age 27.6 (s.d. = 7.7) years, 66% male] and 82 healthy controls [age 29.3 (s.d. = 7.2) years, 66% male] were acquired from the same 1.5 T scanner at baseline and 1-year follow-up as part of the Thematically Organized Psychosis (TOP) study, Oslo, Norway. Scans were automatically processed with the longitudinal stream in FreeSurfer that creates an unbiased within-subject template image. General linear models were used to analyse longitudinal change in a wide range of subcortical volumes and detailed thickness and surface area estimates across the entire cortex, and associations with clinical characteristics.
FEP patients and controls did not differ significantly in annual percentage change in cortical thickness or area in any cortical region, or in any of the subcortical structures after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Within the FEP group, duration of untreated psychosis, age at illness onset, antipsychotic medication use and remission at follow-up were not related to longitudinal brain change.
We found no significant longitudinal brain changes over a 1-year period in FEP patients. Our results do not support early progressive brain changes in psychotic disorders.
PubMed ID
26526001 View in PubMed
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Early identification of non-remission in first-episode psychosis in a two-year outcome study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141450
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Nov;122(5):375-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Erik Simonsen
S. Friis
S. Opjordsmoen
E L Mortensen
U. Haahr
I. Melle
I. Joa
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Unit, Zealand Region Psychiatry Roskilde, Roskilde University and University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. es@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Nov;122(5):375-83
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Remission Induction
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Statistics, nonparametric
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify predictors of non-remission in first-episode, non-affective psychosis.
During 4 years, we recruited 301 patients consecutively. Information about first remission at 3 months was available for 299 and at 2 years for 293 cases. Symptomatic and social outcomes were assessed at 3 months, 1 and 2 years.
One hundred and twenty-nine patients (43%) remained psychotic at 3 months and 48 patients (16.4%) remained psychotic over 2 years. When we compared premorbid and baseline data for the three groups, the non-remitted (n = 48), remitted for
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2011 Jun;123(6):49421219270
PubMed ID
20722632 View in PubMed
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