Skip header and navigation

Refine By

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Social functioning of patients with schizophrenia in high-income welfare societies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52507
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2000 Feb;51(2):223-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
I. Melle
S. Friis
E. Hauff
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department of Research and Education of the Division of Psychiatry, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2000 Feb;51(2):223-8
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Chronic Disease
Developed Countries - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Schizophrenia - rehabilitation
Social Adjustment
Social Isolation
Social Welfare
Unemployment
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The study assessed the level of reintegration into the community of patients with schizophrenia in Oslo, Norway, a country with a well-developed social welfare system and low unemployment rates. METHODS: Eighty-one patients with a DSM-III-R diagnosis of schizophrenia treated in 1980 and in 1983 in a short-term ward of a psychiatric hospital were followed up after seven years. Seventy-four of 76 patients alive at follow-up agreed to participate. Social functioning was measured by the Strauss-Carpenter Level of Functioning Scale and the Social Adjustment Scale. RESULTS: At follow-up 78 percent of patients lived independently, 47 percent were socially isolated, and 94 percent were unemployed. Thirty-four percent had lost employment in the follow-up period. A poor outcome in terms of social functioning and community reintegration was associated with loss of employment. A good outcome was predicted by short periods of inpatient hospitalization, high levels of education, being married, male gender, and not having a late onset of psychosis. CONCLUSIONS: The level of homelessness among these patients with schizophrenia was encouragingly low, which may have been expected in a high-income welfare society. However, insufficient efforts were aimed at social and instrumental rehabilitation, and the level of unemployment was alarmingly high.
PubMed ID
10655007 View in PubMed
Less detail

The UllevÄl acute ward follow-up study: a personal 7-year follow-up of patients with functional psychosis admitted to the acute ward of a catchment area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68594
Source
Psychopathology. 1991;24(5):316-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
S. Friis
E. Hauff
T K Island
S. Lorentzen
I. Melle
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Department B, Ullevål University Hospital, Norway.
Source
Psychopathology. 1991;24(5):316-27
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Catchment Area (Health)
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Eighty-eight patients were admitted to the acute ward of a catchment area suffering from the following functional psychoses: schizophrenia (S; n = 41), affective disorder (AD; n = 22), other disorders (OD; n = 25). Follow-up data were obtained for 97%. Ten patients were dead at follow-up, 8 due to suicide. Sixty-five were personally interviewed. While nearly all the patients had only brief periods of rehospitalization, most had used neuroleptics during the follow-up period. Compared to other samples, functioning at follow-up was fairly good for the AD and OD patients, but rather poor for the S patients.
PubMed ID
1784708 View in PubMed
Less detail

The importance of ward atmosphere in inpatient treatment of schizophrenia on short-term units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211596
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 1996 Jul;47(7):721-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
I. Melle
S. Friis
E. Hauff
T K Island
S. Lorentzen
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department for clinical psychiatric research, Ullevål Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 1996 Jul;47(7):721-6
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Female
Hospital Restructuring
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Readmission
Schizophrenia - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The reorganization in 1981 of a general hospital psychiatric ward in Oslo, Norway, to achieve a more suitable treatment milieu for patients with schizophrenia resulted in a change in patients' perceptions of the ward atmosphere. Reduced group participation and increased individualized support from staff led patients to perceive of the ward as having a low level of anger and aggression and a high level of order and organization. This study examined whether the reorganization was associated with improved treatment outcome.
Psychiatrists retrospectively examined the charts of all patients with a DSM-III-R diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder who were admitted to the ward the year before and the second year after the reorganization. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine treatment outcomes for both groups. Outcome was measured indirectly by length of stay, level of functioning at discharge, and whether the patient was rehospitalized during the following seven years.
Patients treated after the reorganization had significantly shorter stays with no reductions in either level of functioning at discharge or length of community tenure after discharge. Differences in demographic characteristics, illness history, or psychopharmacological treatment could not account for differences in outcome.
The results supported the hypothesis that the organization and milieu of brief-stay wards influence the short-term outcome of inpatient treatment of patients with schizophrenia.
PubMed ID
8807685 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood trauma mediates the association between ethnic minority status and more severe hallucinations in psychotic disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265239
Source
Psychol Med. 2015 Jan;45(1):133-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
A O Berg
M. Aas
S. Larsson
M. Nerhus
E. Hauff
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
Source
Psychol Med. 2015 Jan;45(1):133-42
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Africa - ethnology
Aged
Asia - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hallucinations - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
Ethnic minority status and childhood trauma are established risk factors for psychotic disorders. Both are found to be associated with increased level of positive symptoms, in particular auditory hallucinations. Our main aim was to investigate the experience and effect of childhood trauma in patients with psychosis from ethnic minorities, hypothesizing that they would report more childhood trauma than the majority and that this would be associated with more current and lifetime hallucinations.
In this cross-sectional study we included 454 patients with a SCID-I DSM-IV diagnosis of non-affective or affective psychotic disorder. Current hallucinations were measured with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (P3; Hallucinatory Behaviour). Lifetime hallucinations were assessed with the SCID-I items: auditory hallucinations, voices commenting and two or more voices conversing. Childhood trauma was assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, self-report version.
Patients from ethnic minority groups (n = 69) reported significantly more childhood trauma, specifically physical abuse/neglect, and sexual abuse. They had significantly more current hallucinatory behaviour and lifetime symptoms of hearing two or more voices conversing. Regression analyses revealed that the presence of childhood trauma mediated the association between ethnic minorities and hallucinations.
More childhood trauma in ethnic minorities with psychosis may partially explain findings of more positive symptoms, especially hallucinations, in this group. The association between childhood trauma and these first-rank symptoms may in part explain this group's higher risk of being diagnosed with a schizophrenia-spectrum diagnosis. The findings show the importance of childhood trauma in symptom development in psychosis.
PubMed ID
25065296 View in PubMed
Less detail

Additive effects of childhood abuse and cannabis abuse on clinical expressions of bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261461
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Jun;44(8):1653-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
M. Aas
B. Etain
F. Bellivier
C. Henry
T. Lagerberg
A. Ringen
I. Agartz
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Jun;44(8):1653-62
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies of bipolar disorders indicate that childhood abuse and substance abuse are associated with the disorder. Whether both influence the clinical picture, or if one is mediating the association of the other, has not previously been investigated.
A total of 587 patients with bipolar disorders were recruited from Norway and France. A history of childhood abuse was obtained using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Diagnosis and clinical variables, including substance abuse, were based on structured clinical interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders or French version of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies).
Cannabis abuse was significantly associated with childhood abuse, specifically emotional and sexual abuse (? 2 = 8.63, p = 0.003 and ? 2 = 7.55, p = 0.006, respectively). Cannabis abuse was significantly associated with earlier onset of the illness (z = -4.17, p
PubMed ID
24028906 View in PubMed
Less detail

Affective lability mediates the association between childhood trauma and suicide attempts, mixed episodes and co-morbid anxiety disorders in bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287299
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
M. Aas
C. Henry
F. Bellivier
M. Lajnef
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
T V Lagerberg
S R Aminoff
T. Bjella
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
B. Etain
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age of Onset
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Many studies have shown associations between a history of childhood trauma and more severe or complex clinical features of bipolar disorders (BD), including suicide attempts and earlier illness onset. However, the psychopathological mechanisms underlying these associations are still unknown. Here, we investigated whether affective lability mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and the severe clinical features of BD.
A total of 342 participants with BD were recruited from France and Norway. Diagnosis and clinical characteristics were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS) or the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Affective lability was measured using the short form of the Affective Lability Scale (ALS-SF). A history of childhood trauma was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Mediation analyses were performed using the SPSS process macro.
Using the mediation model and covariation for the lifetime number of major mood episodes, affective lability was found to statistically mediate the relationship between childhood trauma experiences and several clinical variables, including suicide attempts, mixed episodes and anxiety disorders. No significant mediation effects were found for rapid cycling or age at onset.
Our data suggest that affective lability may represent a psychological dimension that mediates the association between childhood traumatic experiences and the risk of a more severe or complex clinical expression of BD.
PubMed ID
27894372 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.