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Airway inflammation, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma in elite ice hockey players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184304
Source
Eur Respir J. 2003 Jul;22(1):113-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
A. Lumme
T. Haahtela
J. Ounap
P. Rytilä
Y. Obase
M. Helenius
V. Remes
I. Helenius
Author Affiliation
Dept of Allergy, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2003 Jul;22(1):113-7
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - epidemiology - etiology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Case-Control Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hockey - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Inflammation - epidemiology
Male
Risk factors
Skin Tests
Abstract
There is little information of lower respiratory symptoms, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in elite ice hockey players. A total of 88 highly trained ice hockey players and 47 control subjects were studied. All the subjects were subjected to skin-prick tests, resting spirometry examinations and histamine-challenge tests. Adequate induced sputum samples were obtained from 68 of the ice hockey players and from 18 symptom-free control subjects on a separate day. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in a histamine-challenge test was found in 21 (24%) of the athletes and in five (11%) of the controls. Current asthma (current asthmatic symptoms and increased bronchial responsiveness) was observed in 13 (15%) of the athletes and in one (2%) of the control subjects. Total asthma (current asthma or previously physician-diagnosed asthma) occurred in 19 (22%) of the athletes and in two (4%) of the controls. Atopy, according to skin-prick tests, was observed in 51 (58%) of the athletes and 17 (36%) of the control subjects. The differential cell counts of eosinophils (2.6 versus 0.2%) and neutrophils (80.9 versus 29.9%) in the sputum samples of the ice hockey players were significantly higher than in those of the control subjects. Asthma is common in elite ice hockey players and they show signs of a mixed type of neutrophilic and eosinophilic airway inflammation. Inhalation of cold air associated with exposure to indoor pollutants during intensive training is a possible causative factor.
PubMed ID
12882460 View in PubMed
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Ample use of physician-prescribed medications in Finnish elite athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169925
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2006 Nov;27(11):919-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
A. Alaranta
H. Alaranta
M. Heliövaara
M. Airaksinen
I. Helenius
Author Affiliation
Division of Social Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. antti.alaranta@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2006 Nov;27(11):919-25
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Allergic Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Sex Distribution
Sports
Abstract
The present study aimed at determining the use of physician-prescribed medication in a large number of elite athletes compared with a representative control sample of the general population. Of all the athletes (N = 494) financially supported by the National Olympic Committee, 446 completed a structured questionnaire (response rate 90.3 %) in 2002. A control group (N = 1503, response rate 80.1 %) comprised an age-matched sample from the population-based study collected by the National Public Health Institute. Any prescribed medication was used by 34.5 % of the athletes and 24.9 % of the controls during the past seven days. The most frequently reported physician-prescribed medications among athletes during the previous seven days were anti-allergic medicines (12.6 % of the respondents), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; 8.1 %), anti-asthmatic medicines (7.0 %), and oral antibiotics (2.7 %). The adjusted odds ratios (95 % CI) for the physician-prescribed medications used during the previous seven days was 2.42 (1.69 - 3.46), 3.63 (2.25 - 5.84), 3.42 (2.05 - 5.70), and 2.15 (1.03 - 4.45) for use of anti-allergic medication, NSAIDs, anti-asthmatic medication, and oral antibiotics, respectively, in the athletes compared with controls. Every fifth athlete reported some NSAID-related adverse effect. In conclusion, the athletes used NSAIDs, antibiotics, anti-asthmatic and anti-allergic medication significantly more often than a representative sample of age-matched controls. All these medicines have potential adverse effects that may have a deleterious impact on the maximum exercise performance of elite athletes. Adverse effects were commonly reported in connection with NSAID use.
PubMed ID
16586342 View in PubMed
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HLA-DRB1* alleles and temporomandibular joint erosion in patients with various rheumatic diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180256
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2004;33(1):24-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
L M J Helenius
D. Hallikainen
I. Helenius
J H Meurman
S. Koskimies
P. Tervahartiala
L. Kivisaari
J. Hietanen
R. Suuronen
C. Lindqvist
M. Leirisalo-Repo
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. miia.helenius@helsinki.fi
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2004;33(1):24-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Connective Tissue Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Expression Regulation
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
HLA-DRB1 Chains
Humans
Male
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prevalence
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Rheumatic Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Risk assessment
Salivary Gland Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - epidemiology - genetics
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - epidemiology - genetics - radiography
Abstract
To investigate the association between HLA antigens and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) erosion, salivary composition, and focal sialadenitis in patients with rheumatic diseases.
Eighty-four patients, 24 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 19 with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 19 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and 22 with spondyloarthropathy (SPA) were studied. Each patient underwent clinical examination of the masticatory system, unstimulated and stimulated saliva collection, and minor salivary gland biopsy. Radiographs (OPTG) of the TMJ were obtained, and HLA allele (A, B, C and DRB1*) analysis was performed. Erosion in OPTG was scored from 0 (no erosion) to 4 (condyles totally eroded). In the analysis, scores 0-2 were grouped as normal or mild changes, and scores 3-4 as distinct erosions. One hundred healthy blood donors served as controls for HLA typing.
Distinct erosion of the TMJ in OPTG was observed in 22 (27%) patients. It affected four (17%) of the 24 patients with RA, three (17%) of the 18 with MCTD, seven (37%) of the 19 patients with AS and eight (38%) of the 21 with SPA non-significant (NS). The mean erosion scores were 1.7 for RA, 1.3 for MCTD, 2.5 for SPA, and 1.6 for AS patients [probability (p) = 0.04]. The frequency of HLA-B27 antigen was higher in the AS and SPA patients, and that of HLA-DRB1*04 allele higher in RA patients than in control subjects. In the whole patient population, HLA-DRB1*01 allele was significantly associated with erosions 16/36 (44%) versus 6/46 (131%1) (p = 0.0014). In the SPA group, patients with HLA-DRBI*01 allele had a significantly higher occurrence of distinct erosions than patients without this allele [8/10 (80%) versus 0/11 (0%) (p = 0.0002)], whereas DRB1*06 was protective [0/8 (0%) versus 8/13 (62%) (p = 0.018)]. HLA-DRB1*04 was associated with increased salivary IgG in the RA patients.
HLA antigens are significantly associated with the development of destructive lesions in the TMJ, as well as composition of saliva in patients with various rheumatic diseases.
PubMed ID
15124939 View in PubMed
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In-hospital treated pediatric injuries are increasing in Finland--a population based study between 1997 and 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133130
Source
Scand J Surg. 2011;100(2):129-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
J S Suominen
M P Pakarinen
S. Kääriäinen
A. Impinen
E. Vartiainen
I. Helenius
Author Affiliation
Section of Paediatric Surgery, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. janne.suominen@hus.fi
Source
Scand J Surg. 2011;100(2):129-35
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - epidemiology
Adolescent
Burns - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Drowning - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Thoracic Injuries - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - mortality - surgery
Abstract
Injuries are an important public health problem as well as the leading cause of death and disability among children. Our aim was to longitudinally explore the incidence of in-hospital treated traumas, their operative treatment and related mortality among pediatric patients in Finland.
The National Hospital Discharge Register and the Official Cause-of-Death Statistics data of in-hospital treated pediatric trauma patients between 1997 and 2006 in Finland were evaluated for hospitalizations, treatment modality and mortality.
Fractures (69%) and head injuries (28%) were the most common in-hospital treated traumas (477/100,000 persons/year). These were followed by injuries of intra-abdominal (1.4%), thoracic (1.2%) and urological organs (0.6%). Head traumas constituted 67% of injury-related deaths. During the ten-year follow-up period, the annual incidence (per 100,000 persons) of head injuries decreased by 13.6% (152 in 1997 vs. 131 in 2006, p
PubMed ID
21737391 View in PubMed
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No effect of montelukast on asthma-like symptoms in elite ice hockey players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182392
Source
Allergy. 2004 Jan;59(1):39-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
I. Helenius
A. Lumme
J. Ounap
Y. Obase
P. Rytilä
S. Sarna
A. Alaranta
V. Remes
T. Haahtela
Author Affiliation
Department of Allergy, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Allergy. 2004 Jan;59(1):39-44
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetates - administration & dosage
Administration, Oral
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Asthma, Exercise-Induced - diagnosis - drug therapy
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - diagnosis - drug therapy
Cross-Over Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Finland
Hockey
Humans
Leukotriene Antagonists - administration & dosage
Male
Probability
Quinolines - administration & dosage
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Spirometry
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Failure
Abstract
Controlled clinical trials on the effects of leukotriene antagonists on asthma-like symptoms, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation have not been performed in elite athletes.
In 2001, we examined 88 of 102 (86%) players from three junior, national league ice hockey teams in Helsinki. Athletes were included in the intervention if they reported at least two exercise-induced bronchial symptoms (wheeze, cough, shortness of breath) weekly during the previous month on a previously validated respiratory-symptom questionnaire. Sixteen male ice hockey players fulfilled the study criteria. A double-blind, randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled study included 4-week active treatment (10 mg oral montelukast, bedtime), 1-week washout period, and 4-week placebo treatment. Before entering the study, all patients were clinically examined, skin prick tested, filled in a respiratory symptom questionnaire, performed a spirometry and a histamine challenge test, and gave induced sputum samples. Exhaled NO was measured. These measures were repeated after both treatment periods. During the treatment the athletes kept daily diary on lower respiratory tract symptoms on a scale from 0 (no symptoms) to 10 (most severe symptoms), morning peak expiratory flow (PEF), training amount, and use of study medication. Primary end-point was daily lower respiratory tract symptom score.
Montelukast had no effect on daily lower respiratory symptom scores, spirometry parameters [forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC ratio, PEF], bronchial hyperresponsiveness, sputum eosinophil or neutrophil cell counts, exhaled NO measurements, or morning PEF. Nine subjects were atopic in skin prick test, but their results did not differ from the nonatopic subjects.
A leukotriene antagonist, montelukast, was of no benefit in the treatment of asthma-like symptoms, increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness or a mixed type of eosinophilic and neutrophilic airway inflammation in highly-trained ice hockey players.
PubMed ID
14674932 View in PubMed
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Scoliosis after solid organ transplantation in children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171085
Source
Am J Transplant. 2006 Feb;6(2):324-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
I. Helenius
H. Jalanko
V. Remes
H. Sairanen
S. Salminen
C. Holmberg
P. Palmu
P. Tervahartiala
H. Valta
S. Sarna
M. Helenius
O. Mäkitie
J. Peltonen
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. Ilkka_Helenius@helsinki.fi
Source
Am J Transplant. 2006 Feb;6(2):324-30
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bone Density
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Heart Transplantation - adverse effects
Human Growth Hormone - therapeutic use
Humans
Infant
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects
Liver Transplantation - adverse effects
Male
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Scoliosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The occurrence of scoliosis in children after solid organ transplantation is not known. A total of 196 children, which is 93% of patients surviving kidney, liver and heart transplantation in our country, participated in a cross-sectional survey. All children were screened for rib hump, and those with clinically significant hump (over 6 degrees ) underwent radiographs of the spine. The occurrence of scoliosis was compared to data obtained from a previously published comparison group. Forty-three (21.9%) of the patients had scoliosis greater than 10 degrees , and 21 (10.7%) of them had curves greater than 20 degrees . The RR (95% CI) for scoliosis needing treatment (over 20 degrees ) was 17.0 (6.75-42.7) in the patients as compared with control population. The occurrence of scoliosis was 17.9% of the kidney, 13.6% of the liver and 51.7% of the heart transplant patients (p
PubMed ID
16426316 View in PubMed
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Severity of vertebral fracture and risk of hip fracture: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145134
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 Jan;22(1):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
V. Puisto
M. Heliövaara
O. Impivaara
T. Jalanko
H. Kröger
P. Knekt
A. Aromaa
H. Rissanen
I. Helenius
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. ville.puisto@helsinki.fi
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 Jan;22(1):63-8
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Educational Status
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Spinal Fractures - epidemiology
Abstract
Severe vertebral fractures strongly predicted subsequent hip fracture in this population-based study. Such high-risk patients should be provided with clinical evaluation and care for osteoporosis.
Vertebral fractures are commonly osteoporotic and known to predict hip fracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate associations between the severity of vertebral fractures and the risk of subsequent hip fracture.
Chest radiographs were obtained of 7,095 Finnish men and women aged 30 years or over in the Mini-Finland Health Survey in 1978-1980. Record linkage to the National Hospital Discharge Register identified 182 subjects from the survey who had subsequently been hospitalized for primary treatment of hip fracture by the end of 1994. A nested case-control setting was adopted, where three controls individually matched for age, gender, and place of residence were drawn for 169 subjects with hip fracture from the same cohort. Baseline vertebral fractures were identified at levels T3 to T12, and their morphology was categorized to mild, moderate, or severe according to Genant's classification.
Severe vertebral fracture (>40% reduction in vertebral body height) strongly predicted hip fracture. After controlling for education, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, and self-rated general health, the adjusted relative odds was 12.06 (95% confidence interval, 3.80-38.26). Mild to moderate fracture grades and the number of compressed vertebral bodies showed no prediction for hip fracture.
The presence of a severe vertebral fracture in the thoracic spine strongly predicts subsequent hip fracture. Such high-risk patients should be clinically evaluated and provided with care for osteoporosis and measures to reduce the risk of falling as required.
PubMed ID
20195843 View in PubMed
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Smoking and atopy as determinants of sputum eosinophilia and bronchial hyper-responsiveness in adults with normal lung function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184038
Source
Respir Med. 2003 Aug;97(8):947-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
T. Petäys
L. von Hertzen
T. Metso
P. Rytilä
P. Jousilahti
I. Helenius
E. Vartiainen
T. Haahtela
Author Affiliation
Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Meilahdentie 2, 000250 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Respir Med. 2003 Aug;97(8):947-54
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bronchi - drug effects
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoconstriction
Bronchoconstrictor Agents - diagnostic use
Eosinophilia - etiology - pathology - physiopathology
Eosinophils
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Male
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Middle Aged
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - pathology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - pathology - physiopathology
Sputum - cytology
Abstract
Data concerning the determinants of sputum eosinophilia and bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) in large cohorts of individuals with normal lung function are limited. Here, we assessed the occurrence of sputum eosinophilia and BHR and identified the risk factors for these variables in two populations living in North Karelia, Finland, and in Pitkäranta, the Republic of Karelia, Russia. These areas are geographically adjacent, but differ, however, fundamentally in major cultural, socioeconomical and lifestyle aspects. The study population comprised 790 Finns and 387 Russian, aged 25-54 years, who were randomly enrolled from the population registers. A methacholine challenge test to measure BHR was successfully performed in 581 (74%) Finns and 307 (79%) Russians with virtually normal lung function (FEV1 > 70% of predicted). Of these, induced sputum samples were obtained from 41% of the Finns and from 67% of the Russians. The proportion of current smokers was 27% among the former and 42% among the latter. Sputum eosinophilia was assessed using a semi-quantitative method, and total concentrations of sputum eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured using an immunoassay. Risk factors for BHR and sputum eosinophilia were identified with a regression analysis. The prevalence of sputum eosinophilia was 22% among the Finns and 19% among the Russians, and the respective figures for BHR were 14% and 13%. The median ECP concentration in sputum was significantly higher among the Russians as compared with the Finns (P
PubMed ID
12924523 View in PubMed
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Snuff use and smoking in Finnish olympic athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168642
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2006 Jul;27(7):581-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
A. Alaranta
H. Alaranta
K. Patja
P. Palmu
R. Prättälä
T. Martelin
I. Helenius
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. antti.alaranta@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2006 Jul;27(7):581-6
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Smoking - epidemiology
Sports
Tobacco, Smokeless
Abstract
This study aimed to assess the prevalence of smoking and snuff use in Finnish elite athletes. Of all the athletes (n = 494) financially supported by the National Olympic Committee, 446 completed a structured questionnaire (response rate 90.3 %) in 2002. A control group (n = 1504, response rate 80.2 %) comprised an age-matched sample from the population-based sample collected by the National Public Health Institute. Any smoking was reported by 11.4 % of the athletes (3.6 % daily and 7.8 % occasionally) and by 38.3 % of the controls (28.1 % and 10.2 %). After adjusting for age, sex, and education, OR (95 % CI) for any smoking was highest 0.42 (0.23 - 0.77) for athletes in skill-based events and lowest 0.06 (0.02 - 0.17) for endurance athletes as compared with controls. Snuff use was reported by 24.6 % of the athletes (9.6 % daily and 15.0 % occasionally) and by 3.7 % of the controls (1.8 % and 1.9 %). The adjusted OR (95 % CI) for any snuff use was highest 15.6 (9.55 - 25.6) for team-sport athletes and lowest 3.33 (1.54 - 7.21) for endurance athletes as compared with controls. Although snuff use in the general female population is rare, also female athletes did use snuff. Though prevalence of daily smoking among athletes was one-seventh of the respective figure for the general population, prevalence of daily snuff use was five-fold that of controls. Tobacco free elite athletes are valuable in health counselling because athletes are considered role models influencing their peers and the sport. Sport associations are challenged to ban all forms of tobacco.
PubMed ID
16802255 View in PubMed
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Surgically treated patients with axial and peripheral Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours: A population based study in Finland during 1990-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265900
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 2015 Jul;41(7):893-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
J. Serlo
I. Helenius
K. Vettenranta
M. Perkkiö
P. Riikonen
M. Sampo
M. Tarkkanen
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 2015 Jul;41(7):893-8
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bone Neoplasms - radiotherapy - surgery
Bone and Bones - pathology - surgery
Bones of Lower Extremity - pathology - surgery
Bones of Upper Extremity - pathology - surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease-Free Survival
Dose Fractionation
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Limb Salvage - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical Records
Proportional Hazards Models
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Sarcoma, Ewing - radiotherapy - surgery
Spine - pathology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The surgical treatment of Ewing's sarcoma family tumours (ESFTs) is challenging especially with axial tumours. The aim of the study was to analyse surgical treatment and outcome in a nationwide, population-based material consisting of surgically treated axial and peripheral ESFTs of bone and soft tissue.
The data were collected from the Finnish National Cancer Registry and the medical records of patients diagnosed during 1990-2009. Fifty-seven patients with surgically treated ESFTs were included, 22 with an axial and 35 with a peripheral primary tumours. The surgical treatment, its complications, survival and prognostic factors were analysed.
Fifty-four patients underwent surgery with a curative intent and three underwent de-bulking operations. Bone reconstruction was performed in six patients with an axial and 15 with a peripheral tumour. Positive resection margins were associated with a worse five-year local relapse-free survival (33% vs. 84% for those with resection margins free of tumour cells, p = 0.003). The five-year sarcoma-specific survival was affected only by an axial location of the primary (61% vs. 89% for those with a peripheral tumour, p = 0.031). The late complications were mainly associated with bone reconstruction and more frequent among patients with a peripheral compared to an axial tumour (p = 0.031).
In the treatment of ESFTs, achieving adequate resection margins is crucial to avoid local relapses. Surgical complications are common particularly with bone reconstruction.
PubMed ID
25817983 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.