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Adolescents with physical disabilities: some psychosocial aspects of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211374
Source
J Adolesc Health. 1996 Aug;19(2):157-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
S E Stevens
C A Steele
J W Jutai
I V Kalnins
J A Bortolussi
W D Biggar
Author Affiliation
Hugh MacMillan Rehabilitation Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Adolesc Health. 1996 Aug;19(2):157-64
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Disabled Persons - psychology
Educational Status
Family
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Ontario
Questionnaires
Schools
Self Concept
Sex Education
Social Behavior
World Health Organization
Abstract
To examine the psychosocial issues related to growing up with a physical disability.
Adolescents with physical disabilities aged 11-16 years were compared with a Canadian national sample of adolescents using the Health Behaviours in School-Aged Children (HBSC), a World Health Organization Cross-National Study survey.
Adolescents with physical disabilities reported good self-esteem, strong family relationships, and as many close friends as adolescents in the national sample. However, adolescents with physical disabilities participated in fewer social activities and had less intimate relationships with their friends. They had more positive attitudes toward school, teachers, and their fellow classmates than the national sample, but fewer had plans for postsecondary education. The majority of adolescents with physical disabilities reported that they had not received information on parenthood, birth control, and sexually transmitted diseases.
There are a number of critical areas of risk for adolescents with physical disabilities to which health promotion efforts should be directed. These include lower levels of peer integration, heightened adult orientation, low educational aspirations, and poor knowledge of sexuality.
PubMed ID
8863089 View in PubMed
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Children in the context of "Achieving Health for All: a Framework for Health Promotion".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229134
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 May-Jun;81(3):196-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Hart-Zeldin
I V Kalnins
P. Pollack
R. Love
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 May-Jun;81(3):196-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Canada
Child
Decision Making
Health education
Health Policy
Health promotion
Humans
Patient Participation
Power (Psychology)
Abstract
We analyze Achieving Health for All: A Framework for Health Promotion with respect to children. Although the document acknowledges the health needs of children, it depicts them as passive beneficiaries of health care efforts taken by others on their behalf. We believe that, like adults, children should become active participants in all of the health-promoting activities proposed in the framework and that they can do so if taught life skills for health which emphasize decision making, coping and community participation skills.
PubMed ID
2361205 View in PubMed
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