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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Asbestos-associated deaths among insulation workers in the United States and Canada, 1967-1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225187
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991 Dec 31;643:1-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-31-1991
Author
I J Selikoff
H. Seidman
Author Affiliation
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, City University of New York, New York 10029-6574.
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991 Dec 31;643:1-14
Date
Dec-31-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestosis - epidemiology - mortality
Canada
Cause of Death
Construction Materials - adverse effects
Humans
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
United States
PubMed ID
1809121 View in PubMed
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Asbestos disease-1990-2020: the risks of asbestos risk assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225803
Source
Toxicol Ind Health. 1991 Sep-Nov;7(5-6):117-27
Publication Type
Article
Author
I J Selikoff
Author Affiliation
Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10027.
Source
Toxicol Ind Health. 1991 Sep-Nov;7(5-6):117-27
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Risk
United States - epidemiology
PubMed ID
1780849 View in PubMed
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Chemical characterization of asbestos body cores by electron microprobe analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255338
Source
J Histochem Cytochem. 1972 Sep;20(9):723-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1972

Death certificates in epidemiological studies, including occupational hazards: inaccuracies in occupational categories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224901
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1992;22(4):493-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
I J Selikoff
Author Affiliation
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, City University of New York, New York 10029-6574.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1992;22(4):493-504
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestosis - mortality
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Death Certificates
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - mortality
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Occupational Diseases - classification - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - classification - statistics & numerical data
Peritoneal Neoplasms - mortality
Pleural Neoplasms - mortality
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
We compared death certificates for asbestos-associated diseases (mesothelioma, lung cancer, asbestosis) in two asbestos workers' cohorts. One (insulation workers) had current or recent employment and a strong, continuing union support system which gave them much information about the effects of asbestos exposure. The second cohort, asbestos factory workers, had no such advantage. The factory had closed almost 30 years before, and its workers had dispersed into many areas of the state and nation. Accuracy of medical diagnosis was comparable in the two groups, but occupational listings were not. Three-quarters of the insulators' death certificates told of asbestos work, while virtually none of the factory workers' certificates provided such information, even for deaths of mesothelioma and asbestosis. The data indicate that disease categories, based on medical and pathological diagnoses, at least for asbestos-associated disease, tend to be accurate. Attempts to identify groups at risk by sorting occupational categories can give variable results, good for those with current exposures, much less satisfactory for those with long-past occupational exposures.
PubMed ID
1442784 View in PubMed
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Decline in death rates among asbestos insulation workers 1967-1986 associated with diminution of work exposure to asbestos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103550
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1990;609:300-17; discussion 317-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990

Distribution of blood lead, blood cadmium, urinary cadmium, and urinary arsenic levels in employees of a copper smelter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240881
Source
Environ Res. 1984 Feb;33(1):76-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1984
Author
R. Lilis
J A Valciukas
J P Weber
A. Fischbein
W J Nicholson
C. Campbell
J. Malkin
I J Selikoff
Source
Environ Res. 1984 Feb;33(1):76-95
Date
Feb-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Adult
Arsenic - urine
Cadmium - blood - urine
Copper
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Lead - blood
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Quebec
Smoking
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Abstract
A cross-sectional medical examination of a copper smelter work force included determination of blood lead (Pb-B), zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), blood cadmium (Cd-B), urinary cadmium (Cd-U), and urinary arsenic (As-U), since it was known that such metal impurities were present in the copper concentrate. A total of 776 copper smelter employees (680 active and 96 retirees and ex-employees) were examined. Another 144 men, never employed in the smelter, but who had worked in copper mines (and sometimes in gold mines) were also examined. Mean Pb-B, ZPP, Cd-B, and As-U were significantly higher in active copper smelter employees than in retirees or miners, indicating exposure and absorption in the copper smelter. Significant correlations between Pb-B and Cd-B, and Cd-U and As-U were present, confirming the common source of absorption. Although there was evidence for an increased lead absorption, this was very moderate, with practically no Pb-B levels in excess of 60 micrograms/dl. A marked effect of smoking on blood cadmium levels was present; nevertheless, for all smoking categories Cd-B levels were significantly higher in active employees, indicating the independent contribution of exposure to cadmium in the smelter. Cd-U did not exceed 10 micrograms/g creatinine, the generally accepted "critical" level for the kidney, but was higher than 2 micrograms/g creatinine, a level very rarely exceeded in the general population, in a sizable proportion of those examined. The highest Cd-U levels were found in retired copper smelter employees; age might have been a contributing factor, besides a longer duration of exposure in the smelter.
PubMed ID
6607161 View in PubMed
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Hazards of lung biopsy in asbestos workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237295
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1986 Mar;43(3):165-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1986
Author
Y. Lerman
J. Ribak
I J Selikoff
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1986 Mar;43(3):165-9
Date
Mar-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestosis - mortality - pathology
Biopsy - adverse effects
Canada
Humans
Lung - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
United States
Abstract
An investigation into the problem of the frequency and hazards of lung biopsy in asbestos workers was performed in two ways. The first study was into the frequency of lung biopsy among 2907 long term asbestos insulation workers in 1981-3 and the second was into the frequency of fatal complications of lung biopsy in 168 deaths from asbestosis among 2271 consecutive deaths of asbestos insulation workers 1967-76. Only 25 (0.9%) of the 2907 asbestos insulation workers reported having had either an open lung biopsy, a needle biopsy, or a transbronchial biopsy. Seven (24%) of these men suffered difficulties as a result of the biopsy. Lung biopsies had been performed on 14 of the 168 workers who died of asbestosis. Three (21%) of these 14 patients had died within 30 days of biopsy as a direct result of the procedure. In most cases there is no need for lung biopsy to establish a diagnosis of asbestosis; generally, it may be defined by history of exposure, clinical and radiological findings, and other well established non-invasive diagnostic procedures. Certainly, legal and compensation recommendation for biopsy should be considered with the possibility of death in mind. If biopsy is performed precautions should be taken, including adequate observation in hospital.
Notes
Cites: Dis Chest. 1966 Nov;50(5):504-85953790
Cites: Thorax. 1968 Sep;23(5):556-625680241
Cites: Chest. 1971 Jan;59(1):18-225099806
Cites: Johns Hopkins Med J. 1973 Feb;132(2):103-164684168
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1974 Jan;109(1):67-724809166
Cites: Clin Chest Med. 1983 Jan;4(1):3-146340926
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Cites: Chest. 1976 Jun;69(6):747-511277893
PubMed ID
3947578 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.