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[A category of patients with tuberculosis concomitant with HIV infection in an anti-TB facility].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184198
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2003;(5):6-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
F A Batyrov
O P Frolova
G N Zhukova
I G Sementsova
O I Mukhanova
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2003;(5):6-9
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Female
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Preventive Health Services
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Abstract
A category of patients with tuberculosis concomitant with HIV infection, who were admitted for inpatient care to the infection department of Tuberculosis Clinical Hospital No. 7, Moscow, during 1996-2001, was analyzed. Peculiarities of the mentioned patients' category (205 subjects) were studied at the anti-TB facility. It was established that males (83.4%), aged 21-30 (48.9%), as well as unemployed (71%) prevailed. As much as 14% of them were homeless and 33% had a prison history. Drug-addiction (76%) and hepatitis C and B (77%) were found to be the key concomitant pathologies in them. HIV was primarily diagnosed at the anti-TB facility in 52% of patients, while tuberculosis had set on before HIV in 34.8% of patients. A major part of patients with tuberculosis concomitant with HIV, who were at the anti-TB facility, had early HIV stages. Specific features of the clinical course of tuberculosis were defined for patients with early HIV stages. It was established that tuberculosis concomitant with early HIV stages is deprived of any peculiarities except for the primary signs' stage, if it has the form of an acute infection. An exacerbation of the tuberculosis process, which quite often leads to its generalization and fatal outcome, can happen during the mentioned period due to a pronounced immunodeficiency.
PubMed ID
12899005 View in PubMed
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[Organization of hospital care to patients with tuberculosis concurrent with HIV infection in Tuberculosis care hospital No. seven].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167667
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2006;(7):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
F A Batyrov
V I Chukanov
A I Shchelkanova
A I Karpenko
I G Sementsova
Zh Iu Iarovaia
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2006;(7):33-7
Date
2006
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Hospitals, Chronic Disease - organization & administration - utilization
Humans
Male
Moscow - epidemiology
Needs Assessment
Prevalence
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Abstract
HIV-infection morbidity rates continue to increase in Moscow, the Moscow Region, and in the whole country. The epidemiological situation associated with tuberculosis concurrent with HIV infection remains tense in Moscow and its region, as judged from the data of an analysis of this disease at tuberculosis hospital seven (TH-7) over 9 years. A total of 411 patients with tuberculosis concurrent with HIV infection were treated at TH-7 in 1996 to December 2004. Among them, 49.6% were Moscow residents, 15.1 and 26.5% of the patients lived in the Moscow Region and other regions of the Russian Federation, respectively; 6.8% were homeless persons and 2% foreigners. The number of patients with tuberculosis concurrent with HIV infection has been annually increasing at TH-7. Among the total number of patients, their proportion was 13.4% in 2004. In the structure of patients with comorbidity, the proportion of surgical patients has been on the rise and it was 51.8% in 2004. Among the surgical patients with tuberculosis concurrent with HIV, the proportion of patients with generalized (multiple organ) tuberculosis has increased; it was 50% in 2004. Patients with tuberculosis concurrent with HIV infection need a greater scope of surgical interventions al number of patients for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.
PubMed ID
16944712 View in PubMed
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