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1,3-Butadiene and leukemia among synthetic rubber industry workers: exposure-response relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166384
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2007
Author
Hong Cheng
Nalini Sathiakumar
John Graff
Robert Matthews
Elizabeth Delzell
Author Affiliation
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Ryals School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Birmingham, AL, USA. hcheng@ms.soph.uab.edu
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Date
Mar-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Butadienes - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens - chemical synthesis - chemistry - toxicity
Chemical Industry - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Dimethyldithiocarbamate - adverse effects
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphoid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Leukemia, Myeloid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Likelihood Functions
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Rubber - adverse effects - chemical synthesis - chemistry
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous research updated the mortality experience of North American synthetic rubber industry workers during the period 1944-1998, determined if leukemia and other cancers were associated with several employment factors and carried out Poisson regression analysis to examine exposure-response associations between estimated exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) or other chemicals and cancer. The present study used Cox regression procedures to examine further the exposure-response relationship between several unlagged and lagged, continuous, time-dependent BD exposure indices (BD parts per million (ppm)-years, the total number of exposures to BD concentrations >100 ppm ("peaks") and average intensity of BD) and leukemia, lymphoid neoplasms and myeloid neoplasms. All three BD exposure indices were associated positively with leukemia. Using continuous, untransformed BD ppm-years the regression coefficient (beta) from an analysis that controlled only for age was 2.9 x 10(-4) (p
PubMed ID
17123495 View in PubMed
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A large novel deletion in the APC promoter region causes gene silencing and leads to classical familial adenomatous polyposis in a Manitoba Mennonite kindred.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154409
Source
Hum Genet. 2008 Dec;124(5):535-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
George S Charames
Lily Ramyar
Angela Mitri
Terri Berk
Hong Cheng
Jack Jung
Patricia Bocangel
Bernie Chodirker
Cheryl Greenberg
Elizabeth Spriggs
Bharati Bapat
Author Affiliation
Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 60 Murray St., Toronto, Box 30, ON, M5T 3L9, Canada. charames@lunenfeld.ca
Source
Hum Genet. 2008 Dec;124(5):535-41
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenomatous Polyposis Coli - genetics
Adult
Base Sequence
DNA Primers - genetics
Ethnic Groups - genetics
Female
Founder Effect
Gene Silencing
Genes, APC
Genetic Linkage
Germ-Line Mutation
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Pedigree
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Sequence Deletion
Abstract
Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant syndrome caused by the inheritance of germline mutations in the APC tumour suppressor gene. The vast majority of these are nonsense and frameshift mutations resulting in a truncated protein product and abnormal function. While APC promoter hypermethylation has been previously documented, promoter-specific deletion mutations have not been reported. In a large Canadian Mennonite polyposis kindred, we identified a large novel germline deletion in the APC promoter region by linkage analysis and MLPA. By RT-PCR and sequence analysis, this mutation was found to result in transcriptional silencing of the APC allele. A few genetic disorders have been characterized as over-represented in the Manitoba Mennonite population, however, the incidence of cancer has not been recognized as increased in this population as compared to other Manitoba ethnic groups. This study strengthens the likelihood that this novel APC promoter mutation is linked to this unique population as a founder mutation.
PubMed ID
18982352 View in PubMed
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Validation of 1,3-butadiene exposure estimates for workers at a synthetic rubber plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166608
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):29-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2007
Author
Nalini Sathiakumar
Elizabeth Delzell
Hong Cheng
Jeremiah Lynch
William Sparks
Maurizio Macaluso
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health, Birmingham, AL 35294-0022, USA. nalini@uab.edu
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):29-43
Date
Mar-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Butadienes - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Carcinogens - administration & dosage - toxicity
Chemical Industry - manpower
Humans
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Rubber - adverse effects - chemistry
Abstract
This investigation assessed the validity of estimates of exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) developed for a plant included in a study of mortality among synthetic rubber industry workers. The estimates were developed without using historical measurement data and have not been validated previously.
Personal BD measurements came from an exposure-monitoring program initiated in 1977. For each job, we computed the year-specific difference between the BD estimate and the mean of BD measurements. We also computed rank correlation coefficients and calculated the mean, across all measurements, of the difference between the estimate and the measurement.
The mean BD concentration was 5.2 ppm for 4978 measurements and 4.7 ppm for the corresponding estimates. The mean difference between estimates and measurements was -0.50 ppm (standard deviation, 26.5 ppm) overall and ranged from -227.9 to +27.0 ppm among all 306 job/year combinations. Estimates were correlated with measurements for all 306 combinations (rank correlation coefficient, r=0.45, p
PubMed ID
17097078 View in PubMed
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