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Bones and Crohn's: risk factors associated with low bone mineral density in patients with Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178988
Source
Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2004 May;10(3):220-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Jesse S Siffledeen
Richard N Fedorak
Kerry Siminoski
Ho Jen
Eric Vaudan
Neena Abraham
Hillary Seinhart
Gordon Greenberg
Author Affiliation
Divisions of Gastroenterology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2004 May;10(3):220-8
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood - urine
Bone Density
Bone Diseases, Metabolic - blood - epidemiology - etiology - urine
Canada - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - blood - complications - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - etiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
Previous studies have confirmed that the prevalence of decreased bone mineral density is elevated in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The objective of the current study was to determine the prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis in a cross-sectional outpatient population of 242 adult patients with Crohn's disease and to determine which clinical characteristics and serum and urine biochemical factors might be predictive of bone loss. Thirty-seven percent had normal bone density, 50.0% were osteopenic, and 12.9% were osteoporotic. Among the sites used to diagnose low bone mineral density, the femoral neck demonstrated the highest prevalence of osteopenia and the ultra-distal radius the highest prevalence of osteoporosis. However, low bone mineral density at one site was always predictive of low bone mineral density at the other. Corticosteroid use during the year before assessment was found to be consistently predictive of low bone mineral density in males but not in females. In contrast, low body mass index and high platelet counts were consistently predictive of low bone mineral density in females but not in males. Disease location, smoking, and age were not predictive of changes in bone mineral density.
PubMed ID
15290915 View in PubMed
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