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A 5-year follow-up study of aggression at work and psychological health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51790
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(4):256-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Annie Hogh
Marie Engström Henriksson
Hermann Burr
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ah@ami.dk
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(4):256-65
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Organizational Culture
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Workplace
Abstract
In a longitudinal cohort study, organizational climate and long-term effects of exposure to nasty teasing (aggression) at work were investigated. The baseline consisted of a representative sample of Danish employees in 1995 with a response rate of 80% (N = 5,652). Of these, 4,647 participated in the follow-up in 2000 (response rate 84%). In 1995, 6.3% were subjected to nasty teasing with no significant gender difference. At baseline, we found significant associations among nasty teasing, a negative organizational climate, and psychological health effects. In the follow-up analyses, associations were found between exposure to nasty teasing at baseline and psychological health problems at follow-up, even when controlled for organizational climate and psychological health at baseline and nasty teasing at follow-up. Stratified for gender, the follow-up associations were significant for women but not for men. Low coworker support and conflicts at baseline and teasing at follow-up mediated the effects on men.
PubMed ID
16262544 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse psychosocial working conditions and risk of severe depressive symptoms. Do effects differ by occupational grade?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259262
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2013 Jun;23(3):415-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Reiner Rugulies
Birgit Aust
Ida E H Madsen
Hermann Burr
Johannes Siegrist
Ute Bültmann
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2013 Jun;23(3):415-20
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupations - classification
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Social Class
Workload - psychology - standards
Abstract
Depression is a major concern for public health. Both adverse working conditions and low socio-economic position are suspected to increase risk of depression. In a representative sample of the Danish workforce we investigated (i) whether adverse psychosocial working conditions, defined by the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model, predicted onset of severe depressive symptoms after 5-year follow-up and (ii) whether the effect of ERI was differential across occupational grades.
A cohort of 2701 Danish employees filled in a questionnaire on work and health in 2000 and 2005. ERI was measured with four effort and seven reward items. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the five-item Mental Health Inventory. Participants scoring = 52 points were defined as cases. We used logistic regression to investigate the association of ERI and occupational grade in 2000 with onset of severe depressive symptoms in 2005. Analyses were adjusted for socio-demographics, health behaviours, survey method, self-rated health, sleep disturbances and non-severe depressive symptoms at baseline.
High ERI predicted onset of severe depressive symptoms at follow-up, after adjustment for co-variates and occupational grade (OR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.12-4.25). Participants with high ERI and low occupational grade showed a considerably higher OR (2.43, 95% CI = 1.07-5.53) compared to participants with low/medium ERI and low grade (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 0.72-2.92), high ERI and high grade (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 0.59-2.70) and low/medium ERI and high grade (reference group).
Adverse psychosocial working conditions predicted onset of severe depressive symptoms. The effect was stronger among employees of lower occupational grades compared to those of higher grades.
PubMed ID
22683769 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use and associations with psychosocial work characteristics. A comparative study of Swedish and Danish gainfully employed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120883
Source
J Affect Disord. 2013 Jul;149(1-3):38-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Linda L Magnusson Hanson
Ida E H Madsen
Hugo Westerlund
Töres Theorell
Hermann Burr
Reiner Rugulies
Author Affiliation
Research division of epidemiology, Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. linda.hanson@stressforskning.su.se
Source
J Affect Disord. 2013 Jul;149(1-3):38-45
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Registries
Social Adjustment
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although depression is common, prevalence estimates of antidepressant use among the workforce and undisputed evidence relating psychosocial work characteristics to depression is scarce. This study cross-sectionally assesses the prevalence of antidepressant use among employed in Sweden and Denmark and prospectively examines associations between work characteristics and antidepressant use.
Data on work demands, influence and learning possibilities was collected 2005-2006 from two representative samples of employed aged 20-59 years from Sweden (n=4351) and Denmark (n=8064) and linked to purchases of antidepressants through national prescription drug registries. Standardized 12-month prevalences were calculated. Cox regressions on work characteristics and incident use were performed separately and estimates pooled.
Employed Swedish residents had higher standardized prevalence than Danish, 6.0% compared to 5.0%. Working fast and conflicting demands were associated with incident use when estimates were pooled, but adjustment for baseline health attenuated these estimates. Emotionally disturbing situations were related to any incident use, and more strongly to use >179 defined daily dosages/year, even after adjustment for various covariates.
Statistics based on national prescription drug registries are influenced by, e.g., treatment seeking behaviours and other reasons for prescription than depression. Selective drop-out may also affect prevalence estimates.
The study indicates that use of antidepressants among the workforce is relatively high and that employed Swedish residents had higher prevalence of antidepressant use than Danish. Relationships between work characteristics and antidepressant use were, however, similar with emotional demands showing the strongest association, indicating that particular groups of employees may be at increased risk.
PubMed ID
22959681 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of perceived job insecurity with ischemic heart disease and antihypertensive medication in the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study 1990-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275103
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Nov;88(8):1087-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Ute Latza
Karin Rossnagel
Harald Hannerz
Hermann Burr
Sylvia Jankowiak
Eva-Maria Backé
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Nov;88(8):1087-97
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - drug therapy - psychology
Occupational Diseases - drug therapy - psychology
Perception
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Risk factors
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the effect of job insecurity based on repeated measurements on ischemic heart disease (IHD) and on antihypertensive medication.
The study population consists of 12,559 employees aged 18-59 years of the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study. With an open cohort design, data from up to four representative waves were linked to four registers. Poisson regression with time-dependent covariates was used to estimate the rate ratio (RR) with confidence interval (CI) of perceived job insecurity associated with first-time IHD hospitalization or mortality 1991-2010 (n = 561 cases) and incident dispensing of prescribed antihypertensive medications 1996-2010 (n = 2,402 cases).
Participants with perceived job insecurity filled more antihypertensive prescriptions (age-, gender-, and calendar year-adjusted RR 1.23, 95 % CI 1.12-1.33) and had a borderline significant higher IHD incidence (RR 1.23, 95 % CI 0.98-1.55). In a subanalysis, the risk of antihypertensive medication dispensed was only significant among employees with worries about both unemployment and poor reemployment opportunities. After explorative stratifications by age, gender, and occupational status, perceived job insecurity was associated with more dispensing of antihypertensive medications to participants less than 50 years of age.
In a country with high social security and active labor market policy, employees with the feeling of an insecure job have a modestly increased risk to fill an antihypertensive prescription. Further studies on health risks of job insecurity should consider improved exposure assessment, earlier outcomes such as medication in order to increase statistical power, and identification of vulnerable population groups.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25731852 View in PubMed
Less detail

Correlation between relative rates of hospital treatment or death due to ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and of IHD-related medication among socio-occupational and economic activities groups in Denmark, 1996-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270069
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2014 Aug;27(4):536-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Harald Hannerz
Kim Dalhoff
Hermann Burr
Ute Latza
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2014 Aug;27(4):536-46
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Cause of Death - trends
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present work was to establish whether or not prescribed medication is a usable risk indicator for work-related ischaemic heart disease (IHD), in Denmark.
Weighted Spearman rank correlation coefficients (rho) were used to evaluate the agreement between Standardised Hazard Ratios (SHR) for hospital treatment or death due to IHD and SHR for purchase of prescriptions for medicine that may prevent IHD from (re)occurring, among socio-occupational and economic activities groups in Denmark. The SHR were based on a 10-year prospective follow-up of 2 million people in Danish national registers 1996-2005.
We found approximately 7 times more cases of medicine usage (N = 411 651) than we did for hospital treatment or death (N = 55 684). The correlations between the 2 types of SHR were strong (rho = 0.94 for the socio-occupational groups; rho = 0.74 for the economic activities groups). We observed, however, one markedly contradictive result; the industrial group entitled 'general practitioner, dentists etc.' was associated both with significantly high rates of medicine usage (SHR = 1.15, 95% CI: 1.12-1.19) and significantly low rates of hospital treatment or death due to IHD (SHR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.71-0.91).
Apart from a few caveats, the strong correlations obtained in the present study signify that purchase of a prescription for IHD-related medication is a usable risk indicator for IHD in the working population of Denmark. The usage of medicine data in addition to or instead of the use of death or hospital data in epidemiological studies on work-related IHD risk will bring about a tremendous increase in statistical power.
PubMed ID
25008851 View in PubMed
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Do dimensions from the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire predict vitality and mental health over and above the job strain and effort-reward imbalance models?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138222
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Feb;38(3 Suppl):59-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Hermann Burr
Karen Albertsen
Reiner Rugulies
Harald Hannerz
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark. hmb@nrcwe.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Feb;38(3 Suppl):59-68
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Registries
Reward
Risk factors
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) comprises dimensions (emotional demands, demands of hiding emotions, meaning of work, quality of leadership, and predictability) that are not in the job strain or the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) models. The study aim was to investigate whether these dimensions explain changes in vitality and mental health over and above the job strain and ERI models.
A cohort of 3552 employees in 2000 were followed up in 2005 (cohort participation of 51%). Regression analyses were carried out with mental health and vitality as dependent variables. A significance level of 0.01 was applied when comparing regression models.
Regarding mental health, both the full COPSOQ-ERI model (p = 0.005) and the full job strain-COPSOQ model (p = 0.01) were significantly better than the ERI and the job strain models. Regarding vitality, none of the full COPSOQ models (i.e. with new COPSOQ dimensions together with job strain or ERI respectively) was significantly better than the ERI (p = 0.03) or the job strain (p = 0.04) models. Emotional demands and low meaning of work predicted poor mental health and low vitality.
In relation to mental health, new psychosocial risk factors have the potential to add to the predictive power of the job strain and ERI models. The current practice of including only items from the ERI and job strain models in public health studies should be reconsidered. Theories regarding the status of, for example, emotional demands and meaning of work should be developed and tested.
PubMed ID
21172772 View in PubMed
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Does affective organizational commitment and experience of meaning at work predict long-term sickness absence? An analysis of register-based outcomes using pooled data on 61,302 observations in four occupational groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257597
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2014 Feb;56(2):129-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Thomas Clausen
Hermann Burr
Vilhelm Borg
Author Affiliation
From the National Research Centre for the Working Environment (Dr Clausen and Mr Borg), Copenhagen, Denmark; and Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA), Berlin, Germany (Dr Burr).
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2014 Feb;56(2):129-35
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Organizational Culture
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
To investigate whether experience of low meaning at work (MAW) and low affective organizational commitment (AOC) predicts long-term sickness absence (LTSA) for more than 3 consecutive weeks and whether this association is dependent on the occupational group.
Survey data pooling 61,302 observations were fitted to the DREAM register containing information on payments of sickness absence compensation. Using multiadjusted Cox regression, observations were followed for an 18-month follow-up period to assess the risk for LTSA.
Low levels of MAW and AOC significantly increased the risk for LTSA during follow-up. Subgroup analyses showed that associations were statistically significant for employees working with clients and office workers but not for employees working with customers and manual workers. Further analyses showed that associations between MAW and LTSA varied significantly across the four occupational groups.
Meaning at work and affective organizational commitment significantly predict LTSA. Promoting MAW and AOC may contribute toward reducing LTSA in contemporary workplaces.
PubMed ID
24451606 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does affective organizational commitment and experience of meaning at work predict risk of disability pensioning? An analysis of register-based outcomes using pooled data on 40,554 observations in four occupational groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259496
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2014 Jun;57(6):709-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Thomas Clausen
Hermann Burr
Vilhelm Borg
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2014 Jun;57(6):709-17
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pensions
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retirement - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Work - psychology
Workplace - organization & administration
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study is to investigate whether experience of meaning at work (MAW) and affective organizational commitment (AOC) predict risk of disability pensioning in four occupational groups.
Survey data from 40,554 individuals were fitted to a national register (DREAM) containing information on payments of disability pension. Using multi-adjusted Cox-regression, observations were followed in the DREAM-register to assess risk of disability pensioning.
Low levels of MAW significantly increased risk of disability pensioning during follow-up referencing high levels of MAW. Respondents with medium levels of AOC had a significantly reduced risk of disability pensioning, when compared to respondents with high levels of AOC. Furthermore, results indicate an interaction effect between AOC and MAW in predicting risk of disability pension.
AOC and MAW are significantly associated with risk of disability pensioning. Promoting MAW and managing AOC in contemporary workplaces may contribute towards reducing risk of disability pensioning.
PubMed ID
24619706 View in PubMed
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Does good leadership buffer effects of high emotional demands at work on risk of antidepressant treatment? A prospective study from two Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258990
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Aug;49(8):1209-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Ida E H Madsen
Linda L Magnusson Hanson
Reiner Rugulies
Töres Theorell
Hermann Burr
Finn Diderichsen
Hugo Westerlund
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Aug;49(8):1209-18
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Emotions
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Leadership
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Occupations
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Emotionally demanding work has been associated with increased risk of common mental disorders. Because emotional demands may not be preventable in certain occupations, the identification of workplace factors that can modify this association is vital. This article examines whether effects of emotional demands on antidepressant treatment, as an indicator of common mental disorders, are buffered by good leadership.
We used data from two nationally representative work environment studies, the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study (n = 6,096) and the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (n = 3,411), which were merged with national registers on antidepressant purchases. All individuals with poor self-reported baseline mental health or antidepressant purchases within 8.7 months before baseline were excluded, and data analysed prospectively. Using Cox regression, we examined hazard ratios (HRs) for antidepressants in relation to the joint effects of emotional demands and leadership quality. Buffering was assessed with Rothman's synergy index. Cohort-specific risk estimates were pooled by random effects meta-analysis.
High emotional demands at work were associated with antidepressant treatment whether quality of leadership was poor (HR = 1.84, 95 % CI 1.32-2.57) or good (HR = 1.70, 95 % CI 1.25-2.31). The synergy index was 0.66 (95 % CI 0.34-1.28).
Our findings suggest that good leadership does not substantially ameliorate any effects of emotional demands at work on employee mental health. Further research is needed to identify possible preventive measures for this work environment exposure.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24554122 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does workplace health promotion in Denmark reach relevant target groups?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269943
Source
Health Promot Int. 2015 Jun;30(2):318-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Marie Birk Jørgensen
Ebbe Villadsen
Hermann Burr
Ole Steen Mortensen
Andreas Holtermann
Source
Health Promot Int. 2015 Jun;30(2):318-27
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diet
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Sex Factors
Smoking
Workplace
Abstract
The aim of the current study was to investigate whether Workplace Health Promotion (WHP) is available for workers with poor health status (overweight, musculoskeletal disorders, sickness absence and poor self-rated health) or health behaviour (smoking, poor diet and sedentarism) and whether they participate in WHP. In total, 9835 workers responded to questions regarding availability to 6 different types of WHP through The Danish Work Environment Cohort Study in 2010. Logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, gender and industry were performed to calculate odds ratios for availability and participation of WHP among groups with different health behaviours and health status. In general, poor health behaviours were associated with reduced availability of and participation in WHP. In contrast, poor health status was generally associated with higher availability of WHP and increased participation. However, poor self-rated health was associated with lower availability of several types of WHP and reduced participation. In general, workers with health challenges that are visible to others had WHP available, whereas workers with less visible health challenges had WHP less frequently available. Health challenges visible to others were associated with higher participation in WHP, whereas poor health behaviour and reduced self-rated health were associated with reduced participation in WHP programmes.
PubMed ID
23770769 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.