Skip header and navigation

Refine By

25 records – page 1 of 3.

Oral health interventions among Indigenous populations in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99214
Source
Int Dent J. 2010 Jun;60(3 Suppl 2):229-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Herenia P Lawrence
Author Affiliation
Discipline of Dental Public Health, Department of Biological and Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Canada. herenia.lawrence@dentistry.utoronto.ca
Source
Int Dent J. 2010 Jun;60(3 Suppl 2):229-34
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
There has been a great deal of research describing the risk factors and determinants that impact on the health and well being of Aboriginal Canadians that has revealed tremendous oral health inequalities between these groups and their non-Aboriginal counterparts. Building on this research, culturally-based preventive interventions are now needed to address the significantly higher rates of oral disease among Aboriginals across Canada. Included in this article is an overview of oral health interventions targeted at First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples in Canada, offering a glimpse of some of the innovative research initiatives originating from within Aboriginal communities that are being used to develop new health programmes and policies to improve the health and well being of this population. Particular emphasis is placed upon community-based and national initiatives to prevent dental caries in young Indigenous children that begin by improving the oral and general health of young women and mothers through pre-conception interventions. In addition, recently developed and implemented national First Nations- and Inuit-led oral health surveys are set to provide new evidence to inform future programmes and policy initiatives that will help to reduce dental disease burden and inequalities affecting Indigenous Canadians.
PubMed ID
20718308 View in PubMed
Less detail

A paired comparison of dental care in Canadians with Down syndrome and their siblings without Down syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180783
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2004 Apr;32(2):99-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Paul J Allison
Herenia P Lawrence
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. paul.allison@mcgill.ca
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2004 Apr;32(2):99-106
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Health Surveys
Down Syndrome
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Questionnaires
Siblings
Abstract
To test the hypothesis that, controlling for age, Canadians with Down syndrome (DS) have dental care that is different to that of their siblings without DS.
A cross-sectional survey of parents of children with DS among members of the Canadian Down Syndrome Society (CDSS), using a validated questionnaire. Parents were asked to complete two versions of the questionnaire: one for their child with DS and another for the sibling closest in age without DS. A total of 2327 questionnaires were distributed; 1221 questionnaires for people with DS and 950 for siblings without DS were returned. A paired analysis (McNemar test) of dental care indicators was performed on data from 938 family pairs, stratifying for age.
For all the dental care indicators and age groups, many respondents indicated the same behaviours or experiences in their child with DS and a sibling without DS. However, depending on the particular form of dental care and the age group, 0-47% of families reported discordant dental care experiences for their child with DS and a sibling without DS. The greatest differences were observed for yearly consults (P = 0.029), restorations (P
PubMed ID
15061858 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exploring school oral health outcomes and neighbourhood factors in schools participating in Ontario's "Healthy Schools" recognition program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135359
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Jan-Feb;102(1):30-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Vanessa E Muirhead
Herenia P Lawrence
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, UK. v.muirhead@qmul.ac.uk
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Jan-Feb;102(1):30-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Dental Care for Children
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health promotion
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Mass Screening
Ontario - epidemiology
Oral Health
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics
School Health Services
Socioeconomic Factors
Voluntary Programs
Abstract
This ecologic study compared school-level oral health outcomes in schools participating in Ontario's "Healthy Schools" program and nonparticipating schools in York Region, Ontario in 2007-2008 and examined the effect of neighbourhood socio-economic factors.
School-aggregated data were obtained for all 243 elementary schools. York Region Public Health Unit provided oral health data from school dental screenings. We obtained information about schools participating in the Ontario's "Healthy Schools" program from publicly accessible websites. Neighbourhood socio-economic data based on school postcodes were extracted from Statistics Canada (2006) census databases. School oral health outcomes included the percentage of children in each school requiring preventive care, non-urgent dental treatment, urgent dental treatment and children with > or = two decayed teeth.
One hundred and six elementary schools (42%) participated in Ontario's "Healthy Schools" program in 2007-2008. Schools participating in the "Healthy Schools" program had a significantly lower percentage of children with > or = two decayed teeth (p or = two decayed teeth than in low-income non-participating schools (p
PubMed ID
21485963 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of early childhood caries in a population of children with history of maltreatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158994
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2008;68(2):94-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Nancy Valencia-Rojas
Herenia P Lawrence
Deborah Goodman
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological and Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2008;68(2):94-101
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Child Abuse, Sexual - statistics & numerical data
Child Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Tooth Discoloration - epidemiology
Tooth Injuries - epidemiology
Tooth Mobility - epidemiology
Tooth, Deciduous - pathology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of early childhood caries (ECC) in a population of maltreated children in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
The sample consisted of preschool-aged children (2 to 6 years) admitted to the care of the Children's Aid Society of Toronto (CAST) between 1991 and 2004. Data were collected by reviewing the dental and social workers' records of CAST ECC was determined using the decayed, missing, and filled deciduous teeth (dmft) index. The type and severity of maltreatment were obtained from the Eligibility Spectrum.
The study included 66 children: 37 (56 percent) boys and 29 (44 percent) girls, with an average age of 4.1 years [standard deviation (SD) = 1.2]. Four (6 percent) children had evidence of dental injury, and none had teeth filled or extracted as a result of decay ECC was observed in 58 percent of the abused children. Of these, the mean decayed teeth ("dt") value was 5.63 (SD = 4.17, n = 38) and 3.24 (SD= 4.21) for the whole sample (n = 66). The proportion of children with untreated caries was 57 percent among "neglected" children (n = 53) and 62 percent in physically/sexually abused cases (n = 13). Logistic regression revealed that children in permanent CAST care and those in its care more than once were significantly less likely to have experienced caries.
Abused and neglected young children had higher levels of tooth decay than the general population of 5-year-olds in Toronto (30 percent prevalence, mean dt= 0.42, SD = 1.20, n = 3185). However, this study did not find any difference in ECC prevalence between children with different types of maltreatment. The study did find that CAST services had a protective effect on children's oral health, which supports the recommendation that child protection services should investigate possible dental neglect in physical/sexual abuse and neglect cases.
PubMed ID
18248339 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of integration of dental services on oral health in long-term care: qualitative analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139522
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e77-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Gary I Finkleman
Herenia P Lawrence
Michael Glogauer
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e77-82
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
Dental Care
Dental Hygienists
Dentists
Dentures
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Homes for the Aged - manpower
Humans
Long-Term Care - manpower
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Pain - classification
Patient care team
Professional-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Toothbrushing - methods
Abstract
To qualitatively analyse how integration of dental service in long-term care (LTC) impacts residents and their oral health.
Few studies have attempted to merge inductive and deductive data to clarify the significance of the complex psychosocial environment in LTC facilities. Understanding the subjective oral health experience of LTC residents in their social setting is key to uncovering behavioural patterns that may be limiting the oral care provided to LTC residents.
A cross-sectional study was performed involving 61 residents in three Ontario LTC facilities. Observations and reflective notes were recorded during open-ended interviews using a structured questionnaire to stimulate conversation topics. This ensured that each resident received the same prompting during the interview process. Inductive analysis was used to identify common patterns and themes within field notes and transcriptions.
The major themes identified included oral hygiene, oral discomfort, general health, appearance, dental access, and denture related issues. Oral hygiene and discomfort were the dominating categories within the facilities.
Two of the three LTC centres identified in this study failed to provide appropriate oral care for their residents. Future research needs to be directed at prospective studies assessing the effect of oral health education and mandatory dental examinations o entry within LTC centres utilising qualitative and quantitative analyses.
PubMed ID
21054509 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are Manitoba dentists aware of the recommendation for a first visit to the dentist by age 1 year?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153311
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Dec;74(10):903
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Tijana Stijacic
Robert J Schroth
Herenia P Lawrence
Author Affiliation
umschrot@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Dec;74(10):903
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Care for Children - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The Canadian Dental Association (CDA) and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommend that children visit the dentist by 12 months of age.
To report on how Manitoba"s general dental practitioners and pediatric dentists manage oral health in early childhood.
Mailed surveys that used the modified survey methods of Dillman were sent to 390 Manitoban general dental practitioners and pediatric dentists. The sampling frame was the Manitoba Dental Association"s Membership Registry, but only those dentists who consented to the release of their mailing information were contacted. Survey data were analyzed with Number Cruncher Statistical Software (NCSS 2007). Descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses and multiple regression analyses were done. A p value of
PubMed ID
19126358 View in PubMed
Less detail

Treatment outcome in endodontics-the Toronto Study. Phase II: initial treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180410
Source
J Endod. 2004 May;30(5):302-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Mahsa Farzaneh
Sarah Abitbol
Herenia P Lawrence
Shimon Friedman
Author Affiliation
Discipline of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Endod. 2004 May;30(5):302-9
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Pulp Diseases - complications - therapy
Dental Restoration Failure
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario
Periapical Periodontitis - etiology
Prospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy - methods
Tooth Root - anatomy & histology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The 4- to 6-yr outcome of initial (first-time) endodontic treatment was assessed for Phase II of the "Toronto Study." In total, 442 teeth were treated by using flared preparation and vertical compaction of warm gutta-percha or step-back preparation and lateral compaction. With 126 teeth excluded (discontinuers: deceased and relocated patients), 163 dropouts, and 31 extracted, 122 (48% recall) were examined for outcome: "healed" (no apical periodontitis [AP], signs, symptoms) or "diseased" (AP, signs, or symptoms). Phase II was analyzed separately and combined with Phase I (n = 242), using Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests (p or = 2-81%), and root-filling length (adequate, 87%; inadequate, 77%). Logistic regression revealed increased risk of disease for preoperative AP (odds ratio = 3.3) and technique (odds ratio = 2.3). This study confirmed AP and highlighted treatment technique as the main predictors of outcome in initial treatment.
PubMed ID
15107640 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quality of life and satisfaction outcomes of endodontic treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187337
Source
J Endod. 2002 Dec;28(12):819-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Natalie N Dugas
Herenia P Lawrence
Paul Teplitsky
Shimon Friedman
Author Affiliation
Department of Endodontics, University of Toronto, Faculty of Dentistry, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Endod. 2002 Dec;28(12):819-27
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Clinical Competence
Demography
Dental Pulp Diseases - psychology
Endodontics
General Practice, Dental
Humans
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Root Canal Therapy - psychology
Saskatchewan
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess quality of life and satisfaction in relation to endodontic treatment in two Canadian populations and the association of these outcomes with the treatment providers' level of training (generalist or endodontist). New patients aged 25 to 40, presenting at the dental faculties in Toronto and Saskatoon were screened. Patients with radiographically identifiable endodontic treatment were invited for interviews conducted using a questionnaire that measured changes in quality of life after endodontic treatment and semantic differential scales that measured satisfaction with endodontic treatment. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, multiple and logistic regression (p
PubMed ID
12489651 View in PubMed
Less detail

Oral health and the aboriginal child: a forum for community members, researchers and policy-makers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152963
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Jun;74(5):429-32
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Jun-2008

Use of mouthguards among 12- to 14-year-old Ontario schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162113
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Jul-Aug;73(6):505
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kausar Sadia Fakhruddin
Herenia P Lawrence
David J Kenny
David Locker
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Jul-Aug;73(6):505
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Mouth Protectors - utilization
Ontario
Questionnaires
Sports Equipment
Tooth Injuries - prevention & control
Abstract
To investigate the frequency of use of mouthguards among a representative sample of Ontario schoolchildren, the type of mouthguard most commonly used and reasons for noncompliance during sporting activities.
A population-based, matched case-control study was undertaken in a total of 30 schools in 2 suburban Ontario communities. Dental hygienists trained in the use of the Dental Trauma Index screened 2,422 children 12 to 14 years of age. Of 810 children identified as potential cases (with evidence of dental trauma) and controls (no dental trauma), 270 responded to a mail survey (135 cases and 135 age- and sex-matched controls). The children with dental injuries provided information such as the age at which the injury occurred and the setting and causes of the injury. Children from both case and control groups answered questions concerning use of mouthguards during sports. Parents provided demographic and other information.
Only 5.5% of children wore mouthguards for school sports, and 20.2% wore protection in league sports. Of those who wore mouth protection, 48.2% wore boil-and-bite mouthguards and 21.4% wore stock-type mouthguards; only 30.4% wore professionally made, custom mouthguards. This high proportion of ill-fitting mouthguards was the major contributor to the commonly perceived problems of speech, breathing discomfort and poor appearance associated with mouthguard use. Boys were 1.52 times more likely to wear mouthguards than girls. Data on history of dental trauma and regularly visiting a dentist were not related to mouthguard use. The single most important predictor of mouthguard use was parents who had private dental insurance (p = 0.02), followed by having a family dentist (p = 0.16).
Mouthguard use was very low in both school and league sports in this sample of Ontario schoolchildren, and the largest proportion of those who wore mouth protection used generic products rather than custom-fitted mouthguards. Lack of parental or coaching advice on mouthguard usage and peer beliefs about esthetics and function were the main reasons for noncompliance.
PubMed ID
17672954 View in PubMed
Less detail

25 records – page 1 of 3.