Skip header and navigation

Refine By

261 records – page 1 of 27.

A 20-year ecological study of the temporal association between influenza and meningococcal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30400
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(2):181-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Elise Snitker Jensen
Søren Lundbye-Christensen
Susanne Samuelsson
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Henrik Carl Schønheyder
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Arhus, Denmark. esjensen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(2):181-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Meningococcal Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Periodicity
Poisson Distribution
Prognosis
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Both influenza and meningococcal disease (MD) show seasonal variation with peak incidence rates during the winter. We examined whether fluctuations in occurrence of influenza were associated with changes in the incidence rate of MD, either simultaneously or with a delay of one or 2 weeks, and whether age had an impact on these associations. This ecological study was based on weekly surveillance data on influenza and a complete registration of MD cases (n = 413) in North Jutland County, Denmark, during 1980-1999. A total of 379 MD cases occurred during weeks with influenza registration. The analysis was done using a Poisson regression model taking into account the seasonal variation and trend over time in incidence rate of MD, and stratified by age: or = 14 years (n = 152). An increase of 100 registered cases of influenza per 100,000 inhabitants was associated with a 7% (95% CI: -1 to 15%) increase in the number of MD cases during the same week. The association was most marked for
PubMed ID
15074574 View in PubMed
Less detail

25 year trends in first time hospitalisation for acute myocardial infarction, subsequent short and long term mortality, and the prognostic impact of sex and comorbidity: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127603
Source
BMJ. 2012;344:e356
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Morten Schmidt
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Timothy L Lash
Hans Erik Bøtker
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. msc@dce.au.dk
Source
BMJ. 2012;344:e356
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine 25 year trends in first time hospitalisation for acute myocardial infarction in Denmark, subsequent short and long term mortality, and the prognostic impact of sex and comorbidity.
Nationwide population based cohort study using medical registries.
All hospitals in Denmark.
234,331 patients with a first time hospitalisation for myocardial infarction from 1984 through 2008.
Standardised incidence rate of myocardial infarction and 30 day and 31-365 day mortality by sex. Comorbidity categories were defined as normal, moderate, severe, and very severe according to the Charlson comorbidity index, and were compared by means of mortality rate ratios based on Cox regression.
The standardised incidence rate per 100,000 people decreased in the 25 year period by 37% for women (from 209 to 131) and by 48% for men (from 410 to 213). The 30 day, 31-365 day, and one year mortality declined from 31.4%, 15.6%, and 42.1% in 1984-8 to 14.8%, 11.1%, and 24.2% in 2004-8, respectively. After adjustment for age at time of myocardial infarction, men and women had the same one year risk of dying. The mortality reduction was independent of comorbidity category. Comparing patients with very severe versus normal comorbidity during 2004-8, the mortality rate ratio, adjusted for age and sex, was 1.96 (95% CI 1.83 to 2.11) within 30 days and 3.89 (3.58 to 4.24) within 31-365 days.
The rate of first time hospitalisation for myocardial infarction and subsequent short term mortality both declined by nearly half between 1984 and 2008. The reduction in mortality occurred for all patients, independent of sex and comorbidity. However, comorbidity burden was a strong prognostic factor for short and long term mortality, while sex was not.
Notes
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Feb 7;47(3 Suppl):S21-916458167
Cites: Am Heart J. 2006 May;151(5):1094-110016644342
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):22-521775345
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 2006 Nov;53(4):441-917150149
Cites: Methods Inf Med. 2000 Mar;39(1):7-1110786063
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2000 Sep;36(3):959-6910987628
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2000 Nov;21(22):1833-4011052855
Cites: Circulation. 2001 Jul 3;104(1):19-2411435332
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Sep;38(3):729-3511527625
Cites: Circulation. 2002 Oct 29;106(18):2309-1412403659
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2002 Nov 11;162(20):2269-7612418941
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2003 Feb;56(2):124-3012654406
Cites: Am Heart J. 2003 Nov;146(5):839-4714597933
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2004 Jan;14(1):17-2314664775
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Feb 18;43(4):576-8214975466
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Jun 29;109(25):3244-5515198946
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Aug 3;110(5):522-715262842
Cites: Am J Med. 2004 Aug 15;117(4):228-3315308431
Cites: Rev Esp Cardiol. 2004 Sep;57(9):842-915373990
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(5):373-833558716
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1992 Jun;19(7):1399-4011593030
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Feb 15;143(4):338-508633618
Cites: Lancet. 1999 May 8;353(9164):1547-5710334252
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Jul 22;341(4):226-3210413734
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1999 Jun;46(3):263-810421985
Cites: Circulation. 1999 Aug 10;100(6):599-60710441096
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2005 Dec 1;96(11):1469-7516310424
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Dec 19;114(25):2806-1417145994
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2007 Apr 12;117(1):97-10216839629
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2007 May 7;96(9):1462-817406360
Cites: JAMA. 2007 May 2;297(17):1892-90017473299
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Jun 7;356(23):2388-9817554120
Cites: Am Heart J. 2008 Oct;156(4):719-2718926153
Cites: BMJ. 2009;338:b3619171564
Cites: Circulation. 2009 Feb 3;119(4):503-1419153274
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2009 Oct 15;104(8):1030-419801019
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2009 Mar;2(2):88-9520031820
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Feb 23;121(7):863-920142444
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Jun 10;362(23):2155-6520558366
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2010 Nov;3(6):581-920923995
Cites: Am J Med. 2011 Jan;124(1):40-721187184
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2011 Mar 1;107(5):651-421195375
Cites: J Public Health (Oxf). 2011 Mar;33(1):131-820634202
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Mar 15;173(6):676-8221330339
Cites: Am Heart J. 2011 Apr;161(4):664-7221473964
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011;11:8321619668
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2012 Apr;9(4):18622348972
Comment In: BMJ. 2012;344:d780922279112
PubMed ID
22279115 View in PubMed
Less detail

30-year mortality after venous thromboembolism: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257922
Source
Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):829-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-2014
Author
Kirstine Kobberøe Søgaard
Morten Schmidt
Lars Pedersen
Erzsébet Horváth-Puhó
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. kks@clin.au.dk.
Source
Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):829-36
Date
Sep-2-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Studies on long-term mortality after venous thromboembolism (VTE) are sparse.
Using Danish medical databases, we conducted a 30-year nationwide population-based cohort study of 128 223 patients with first-time VTE (1980-2011) and a comparison cohort of 640 760 people from the general population (without VTE) randomly matched by sex, year of birth, and calendar period. The mortality risks for patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) were markedly higher than for the comparison cohort during the first year, especially within the first 30 days (3.0% and 31% versus 0.4%). Using Cox regression, we assessed mortality rate ratios (MRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The overall 30-year MRR was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.53-1.57) for DVT and 2.77 (95% CI, 2.74-2.81) for PE. The 30-day MRR was 5.38 (95% CI, 5.00-5.80) for DVT and 80.87 (95% CI, 76.02-86.02) for PE. Over time, the 30-day MRR was consistently 5- to 6-fold increased for DVT, whereas it improved for PE from 138 (95% CI, 125-153) in 1980 to 1989 to 36.08 (95% CI, 32.65-39.87) in 2000 to 2011. The 1- to 10-year and 11- to 30-year MRRs remained 25% to 40% increased after both DVT and PE but were 3- to 5-fold increased after DVT and 6- to 11-fold increased after PE when VTE was considered the immediate cause of death.
Patients with VTE are at increased risk of dying, especially within the first year after diagnosis, but also during the entire 30 years of follow-up, with VTE as an important cause of death. Although 30-day mortality after DVT remained fairly constant over the last 3 decades, it improved markedly for PE.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Sep;11(9):49625027484
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Sep;11(9):49725027486
PubMed ID
24970783 View in PubMed
Less detail

30-year nationwide trends in incidence of atrial fibrillation in Denmark and associated 5-year risk of heart failure, stroke, and death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286741
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2016 Dec 15;225:30-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2016
Author
Morten Schmidt
Sinna Pilgaard Ulrichsen
Lars Pedersen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Jens Cosedis Nielsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2016 Dec 15;225:30-36
Date
Dec-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Cohort Studies
Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Registries
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Time Factors
Abstract
Long-term nationwide trends in atrial fibrillation (AF) incidence and 5-year outcomes are rare.
We conducted a population-based cohort study using the Danish National Patient Registry covering all Danish hospitals. We computed standardized incidence rates during 1983-2012. We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of heart failure, stroke, and death within 5years, comparing 5-year calendar periods with the earliest period (1983-1987) as reference.
We identified 312,420 patients with first-time hospital-diagnosed AF. The incidence rate per 100,000person-years increased from 98 in 1983 to 307 in 2012. The mean annual increase during the 30-year study period was 4%, with a 6% increase annually until 2000 and a 1.4% increase annually thereafter. The incidence trends were most pronounced among men and persons above 70years. Among high-risk subgroups, AF incidence was consistently highest in patients with valvular heart disease or heart failure. The rate of heart failure following AF declined by 50% over the entire study period (HR: 0.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.48-0.51) and the mortality rate declined by 40% (HR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.61-0.63). Within the last two decades, the rate for ischemic stroke declined by 20% (HR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.78-0.84), but increased almost as much for haemorrhagic stroke (HR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01-1.29).
The long-term risk of heart failure, ischemic stroke, and death following onset of AF has decreased remarkably over the last three decades. Still, the threefold increased incidence of hospital-diagnosed AF during the same period is a major public health concern.
PubMed ID
27705839 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acromegaly incidence, prevalence, complications and long-term prognosis: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280006
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2016 Sep;175(3):181-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Jakob Dal
Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen
Marianne Andersen
Lars Ø Kristensen
Peter Laurberg
Lars Pedersen
Olaf M Dekkers
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Jens Otto L Jørgensen
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2016 Sep;175(3):181-90
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acromegaly - diagnosis - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Registries
Stroke - epidemiology
Abstract
Valid data on acromegaly incidence, complications and mortality are scarce. The Danish Health Care System enables nationwide studies with complete follow-up and linkage among health-related databases to assess acromegaly incidence, prevalence, complications and mortality in a population-based cohort study.
All incident cases of acromegaly in Denmark (1991-2010) were identified from health registries and validated by chart review. We estimated the annual incidence rate of acromegaly per 10(6) person-years (py) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). For every patient, 10 persons were sampled from the general population as a comparison cohort. Cox regression and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used.
Mean age at diagnosis (48.7 years (CI: 95%: 47.2-50.1)) and annual incidence rate (3.8 cases/10(6) persons (95% CI: 3.6-4.1)) among the 405 cases remained stable. The prevalence in 2010 was 85 cases/10(6) persons. The patients were at increased risk of diabetes mellitus (HR: 4.0 (95% CI: 2.7-5.8)), heart failure (HR: 2.5 (95% CI: 1.4-4.5)), venous thromboembolism (HR: 2.3 (95% CI: 1.1-5.0)), sleep apnoea (HR: 11.7 (95% CI: 7.0-19.4)) and arthropathy (HR: 2.1 (95% CI: 1.6-2.6)). The complication risk was also increased before the diagnosis of acromegaly. Overall mortality risk was elevated (HR: 1.3 (95% CI: 1.0-1.7)) but uninfluenced by treatment modality.
(i) The incidence rate and age at diagnosis of acromegaly have been stable over decades, and the prevalence is higher than previously reported. (ii) The risk of complications is very high even before the diagnosis. (iii) Mortality risk remains elevated but uninfluenced by mode of treatment.
PubMed ID
27280374 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active and passive smoking and fecundability in Danish pregnancy planners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103071
Source
Fertil Steril. 2014 Jul;102(1):183-191.e2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Rose G Radin
Elizabeth E Hatch
Kenneth J Rothman
Ellen M Mikkelsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Anders H Riis
Lauren A Wise
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: radin@bu.edu.
Source
Fertil Steril. 2014 Jul;102(1):183-191.e2
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark
Female
Fertility
Humans
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation
Time Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the extent to which fecundability is associated with active smoking, time since smoking cessation, and passive smoking.
Prospective cohort study.
Denmark, 2007-2011.
A total of 3,773 female pregnancy planners aged 18-40 years.
None.
Self-reported pregnancy. Fecundability ratios (FRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using a proportional probabilities model that adjusted for menstrual cycle at risk and potential confounders.
Among current smokers, smoking duration of =10 years was associated with reduced fecundability compared with never smokers (FR, 0.85, 95% CI 0.72-1.00). Former smokers who had smoked =10 pack-years had reduced fecundability regardless of when they quit smoking (1-1.9 years FR, 0.83, 95% CI 0.54-1.27; =2 years FR, 0.73, 95% CI 0.53-1.02). Among never smokers, the FRs were 1.04 (95% CI 0.89-1.21) for passive smoking in early life and 0.92 (95% CI 0.82-1.03) for passive smoking in adulthood.
Among Danish pregnancy planners, cumulative exposure to active cigarette smoking was associated with delayed conception among current and former smokers. Time since smoking cessation and passive smoking were not appreciably associated with fecundability.
PubMed ID
24746741 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute admissions to medical departments in Denmark: diagnoses and patient characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262754
Source
Eur J Intern Med. 2014 Sep;25(7):639-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Betina Vest-Hansen
Anders Hammerich Riis
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Christian Fynbo Christiansen
Source
Eur J Intern Med. 2014 Sep;25(7):639-45
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clinical Coding - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Despite extensive research on individual diseases, population-based knowledge about reasons for acute medical admissions remains limited. Our aim was to examine primary diagnoses, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) score, age, and gender among patients admitted acutely to medical departments in Denmark.
In this population-based observational study, 264,265 acute medical patients admitted during 2010 were identified in the Danish National Registry of Patients (DNRP), covering all hospitals in Denmark. Reasons for acute admissions were assessed by primary diagnoses, grouped according to the International Classification of Diseases 10th edition. Additionally, the CCI score, age and gender were presented according to each diagnostic group.
Two-thirds of the patients had one of the four following reasons for admission: cardiovascular diseases (19.3%), non-specific Z-diagnoses ("Factors influencing health status and contact with health services") (16.9%), infectious diseases (15.5%), and non-specific R-diagnoses ("Symptoms and abnormal findings, not elsewhere classified") (11.8%). In total, 45% of the patients had a CCI score of one or more and there was a considerable overlap between the patients' chronic diseases and the reason for admission. The median age of the study population was 64 years (IQR 47-77 years), ranging from 46 years (IQR 27-66) for injury and poisoning to 74 years (IQR 60-83) for hematological diseases. Gender representation varied considerably within the diagnostic groups, for example with male predominance in mental disorders (59.0%) and female predominance in diseases of the musculoskeletal system (57.8%).
Our study identifies that acute medical patients often present with non-specific symptoms or complications related to their chronic diseases.
PubMed ID
24997487 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute kidney injury treated with renal replacement therapy and 5-year mortality after myocardial infarction-related cardiogenic shock: a nationwide population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274241
Source
Crit Care. 2015;19:452
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Marie Dam Lauridsen
Henrik Gammelager
Morten Schmidt
Thomas Bøjer Rasmussen
Richard E Shaw
Hans Erik Bøtker
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Christian Fynbo Christiansen
Source
Crit Care. 2015;19:452
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - therapy
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dialysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Myocardial Infarction - complications - mortality
Renal Replacement Therapy - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Shock, Cardiogenic - complications - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Myocardial infarction-related cardiogenic shock is frequently complicated by acute kidney injury. We examined the influence of acute kidney injury treated with renal replacement therapy (AKI-RRT) on risk of chronic dialysis and mortality, and assessed the role of comorbidity in patients with cardiogenic shock.
In this Danish cohort study conducted during 2005-2012, we used population-based medical registries to identify patients diagnosed with first-time myocardial infarction-related cardiogenic shock and assessed their AKI-RRT status. We computed the in-hospital mortality risk and adjusted relative risk. For hospital survivors, we computed 5-year cumulative risk of chronic dialysis accounting for competing risk of death. Mortality after discharge was computed with use of Kaplan-Meier methods. We computed 5-year hazard ratios for chronic dialysis and death after discharge, comparing AKI-RRT with non-AKI-RRT patients using a propensity score-adjusted Cox regression model.
We identified 5079 patients with cardiogenic shock, among whom 13% had AKI-RRT. The in-hospital mortality was 62% for AKI-RRT patients, and 36% for non-AKI-RRT patients. AKI-RRT remained associated with increased in-hospital mortality after adjustment for confounders (relative risk=1.70, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.59-1.81). Among the 3059 hospital survivors, the 5-year risk of chronic dialysis was 11% (95% CI: 8-16%) for AKI-RRT patients, and 1% (95% CI: 0.5-1%) for non-AKI-RRT patients (adjusted hazard ratio: 15.9 (95% CI: 8.7-29.3). The 5-year mortality was 43% (95% CI: 37-53%) for AKI-RRT patients compared with 29% (95% CI: 29-31%) for non-AKI-RRT patients. The adjusted 5-year hazard ratio for death was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.22-1.96) for AKI-RRT patients compared with non-AKI-RRT patients. In patients with comorbidity, absolute mortality increased while relative impact of AKI-RRT on mortality decreased.
AKI-RRT following myocardial infarction-related cardiogenic shock predicted elevated short-term mortality and long-term risk of chronic dialysis and mortality. The impact of AKI-RRT declined with increasing comorbidity suggesting that intensive treatment of AKI-RRT should be accompanied with optimized treatment of comorbidity when possible.
Notes
Cites: Crit Care. 2013;17(4):R14523876346
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2002 Jan 1;89(1):73-511779529
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Aug;29(8):541-924965263
Cites: Crit Care. 2013;17(6):R29224330762
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2015;15:2325888061
Cites: Am J Med. 2002 Feb 1;112(2):115-911835949
Cites: Circulation. 2000 Sep 5;102(10):1193-20910973852
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2002 Apr 1;89(7):791-611909560
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2003 Feb;56(2):124-3012654406
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1986 Jan;123(1):174-843509965
Cites: Br Heart J. 1995 Aug;74(2):124-307546989
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2005 Jan;26(1):18-2615615795
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Jul 27;294(4):448-5416046651
Cites: Hepatology. 2006 Nov;44(5):1075-8217058242
Cites: Am Heart J. 2006 Dec;152(6):1035-4117161048
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Jun 7;356(23):2388-9817554120
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Feb 5;117(5):686-9718250279
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2008 Aug;52(2):272-8418562058
Cites: Circulation. 2009 Mar 10;119(9):1211-919237658
Cites: Clin Cardiol. 2009 Aug;32(8):E4-819455673
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2010 Feb;38(2):438-4419789449
Cites: Ann Thorac Surg. 2010 Dec;90(6):1939-4321095340
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):26-921775346
Cites: BMJ. 2012;344:e35622279115
Cites: Acta Cardiol. 2011 Dec;66(6):691-922299378
Cites: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2012 Mar;9(3):158-7122182955
Cites: Am Heart J. 2012 Jun;163(6):963-7122709748
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Jun;41(3):861-7022253319
Cites: Circulation. 2013 Jan 29;127(4):529-5523247303
Cites: Eur J Clin Invest. 2013 May;43(5):483-9023441924
Cites: Contrib Nephrol. 2013;182:99-11623689658
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2013 Nov;6(6):708-1524221834
Cites: Eur Heart J Acute Cardiovasc Care. 2014 Mar;3(1):67-7724562805
PubMed ID
26715162 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute stress reaction and completed suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96373
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Jul 12;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-12-2010
Author
Jaimie L Gradus
Ping Qin
Alisa K Lincoln
Matthew Miller
Elizabeth Lawler
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Timothy L Lash
Author Affiliation
National Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare System and Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA, Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA, National Centre for Register-based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, Health Sciences and Sociology Departments, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA, Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA, Department of Medicine, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA and Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Jul 12;
Date
Jul-12-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Acute stress reaction is a diagnosis given immediately following the experience of an exceptional mental or physical stressor. To the best of our knowledge, no study has examined the association between acute stress reaction diagnosis and suicide. The current study examined this association in a population-based sample. In addition, we examined comorbid psychiatric diagnoses as modifiers of this association. METHODS: Data for the current study were obtained from the nationwide Danish health and administrative registries, which include data for all 5.4 million residents of Denmark. All suicides between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 2006 were included and controls were selected from a sample of all Danish residents. Using this nested case-control design, we examined 9612 suicide cases and 199 306 controls matched to cases with respect to gender, date of birth and time. RESULTS: In total, 95 cases (0.99%) and 165 controls (0.08%) had a diagnosis of acute stress reaction. Those diagnosed with acute stress reaction had 10 times the rate of completed suicide compared with those without this diagnosis, adjusting for the control to case matching, depression and marital status (95% confidence interval 7.7-14). Additionally, persons with acute stress reaction and depression, or acute stress reaction and substance abuse, had a greater rate of suicide than expected based on their independent effects. CONCLUSIONS: Acute stress reaction is a risk factor for completed suicide.
PubMed ID
20624822 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult height and risk of ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation, stroke, venous thromboembolism, and premature death: a population based 36-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105680
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Feb;29(2):111-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Morten Schmidt
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Pedersen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Allé 43-45, 8200, Aarhus, Denmark, morten.schmidt@dadlnet.dk.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Feb;29(2):111-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Body Height
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality, Premature
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - diagnosis - mortality
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Stroke - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Venous Thromboembolism - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Few studies have associated height with cardiovascular diseases other than myocardial infarction. We conducted a population-based 36-year cohort study of 12,859 men born in 1955 or 1965 whose fitness for military service was assessed by Draft Boards in Northern Denmark. Hospital diagnoses for ischemic heart diseases, atrial fibrillation, stroke, and venous thromboembolism were obtained from the Danish National Patient Registry, covering all Danish hospitals since 1977. Mortality data were obtained from the Danish Civil Registration System. We began follow-up on the 22nd birthday of each subject and continued until occurrence of an outcome, emigration, death, or 31 December 2012, whichever came first. We used Cox regression to compute hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Compared with short stature, the education-adjusted HR among tall men was 0.67 (95 % CI 0.54-0.84) for ischemic heart disease (similar for myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, and heart failure), 1.60 (95 % CI 1.11-2.33) for atrial fibrillation, 1.05 (95 % CI 0.75-1.46) for stroke, 1.04 (95 % CI 0.67-1.64) for venous thromboembolism, and 0.70 (95 % CI 0.58-0.86) for death. In conclusion, short stature was a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and premature death, but a protective factor for atrial fibrillation. Stature was not substantially associated with stroke or venous thromboembolism.
PubMed ID
24337942 View in PubMed
Less detail

261 records – page 1 of 27.