Skip header and navigation

Refine By

9 records – page 1 of 1.

1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
Cites: Child Obes. 2012 Dec;8(6):533-4123181919
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Aug;6(3-4):188-9621529264
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2014 Jan;38(1):40-523828099
Cites: Pediatr Diabetes. 2014 May;15(3):151-6124754463
Cites: Semin Liver Dis. 2001;21(1):3-1611296695
Cites: Pediatr Clin North Am. 2011 Dec;58(6):1375-92, x22093857
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Feb;20(2):371-521869763
Cites: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2012 Jul;199(1):2-722733887
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jul;97(7):E1099-10522508709
Cites: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2009 Feb;19(2):146-5219171470
Cites: Pediatr Diabetes. 2014 Sep;15 Suppl 20:4-1725182305
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Feb;25(2):177-8411410817
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2001 Dec;86(12):5755-6111739435
Cites: Diabetes. 2002 Apr;51(4):1022-711916921
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Mar 25;107(11):1562-612654618
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Sep 20;362(9388):951-714511928
Cites: Pediatrics. 2004 Aug;114(2 Suppl 4th Report):555-7615286277
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Oct;28(10):1257-6315278103
Cites: Nutr Rev. 1981 Feb;39(2):43-557010232
Cites: Stat Med. 1992 Jul;11(10):1305-191518992
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 Oct;58(4):463-78379501
Cites: Diabetes. 1997 Jun;46(6):983-89166669
Cites: Diabetologia. 1999 Jan;42(1):113-610027589
Cites: Diabetes. 1999 Oct;48(10):2039-4410512371
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Mar;14(3):357-6716648604
Cites: Pediatrics. 2006 Oct;118(4):1388-9317015527
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Jan;30(1):89-9417192339
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jul;61(7):877-8317151586
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Jul 15;118(3):277-8318591439
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2009 Feb;32(2):342-718957533
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Sep;94(9):3440-719531593
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun 1;171(11):1195-20220457571
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2010 Sep;163(3):413-920584996
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Dec;95(12):5189-9820829185
Cites: J Clin Res Pediatr Endocrinol. 2010;2(3):100-621274322
Cites: Diabetologia. 2011 Apr;54(4):869-7521181394
Cites: Abdom Imaging. 2013 Apr;38(2):315-922736224
PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fluctuations in eGFR in relation to unenhanced and enhanced MRI and CT outpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258923
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2014 Jun;83(6):886-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Manal Azzouz
Janne Rømsing
Henrik S Thomsen
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2014 Jun;83(6):886-92
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Artifacts
Contrast Media - diagnostic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate - drug effects
Humans
Incidence
Iopamidol - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - diagnostic use
Kidney Diseases - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - adverse effects
Male
Meglumine - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Middle Aged
Organometallic Compounds - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
To study fluctuations in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in relation to contrast medium (CM) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) compared to control groups in outpatients.
eGFR was determined right before the imaging procedure and three days later at the department or at the patient's home. The iodine-based and gadolinium-based contrast media were the same as used for all other examinations at the department.
A total of 716 patients completed the study. There was a statistically significant, but not clinically relevant rise in eGFR after three days in all four groups. The average eGFR variation was 4.8 ml/min/1.73 m(2). There were large variations in eGFR between the two measurements in 45.8% of the patients as they had a change greater than ± 10 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Only three patients fulfilled the contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) requirement when the definition s-creatinine = 44 µmol/l (0.5mg/dl) was used.
eGFR in outpatients undergoing MRI or CT did vary independently of whether the patient received contrast or not. The findings probably reflect the natural variations in s-creatinine levels. This should be taken into consideration when CIN is studied.
PubMed ID
24656402 View in PubMed
Less detail

High prevalence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in chronic renal failure patients exposed to gadodiamide, a gadolinium-containing magnetic resonance contrast agent.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159326
Source
Invest Radiol. 2008 Feb;43(2):141-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Casper Rydahl
Henrik S Thomsen
Peter Marckmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Invest Radiol. 2008 Feb;43(2):141-4
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Contrast Media
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gadolinium - adverse effects
Gadolinium DTPA
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious disease affecting renal failure patients. It may be caused by some gadolinium (Gd)-containing contrast agents, including gadodiamide. The study aimed at estimating the prevalence of NSF after gadodiamide exposure for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).
Retrospective cohort study of 190 consecutive nephrological patients in different categories of kidney function referred for gadodiamide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the period January 1, 2004 to March 21, 2006.
Eighteen patients (18/190; 10%, 95% CI: 6%-15%) were diagnosed with NSF within a mean follow-up period of 29 months (range 16-43 months). All 18 cases had stage 5 CKD (ie, estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 or in dialysis therapy) at the time of their gadodiamide exposure. The prevalence of NSF among patients with stage 5 CKD at exposure (n = 102) was 18% (95% CI: 11%-27%). No cases were seen among 88 gadodiamide-exposed patients who had milder degrees of renal insufficiency (prevalence 0%, 95% CI: 0%-4%).
The risk of NSF is unacceptably high among stage 5 CKD patients exposed to gadodiamide.
PubMed ID
18197066 View in PubMed
Less detail

MRI diagnosis of fracture of the scaphoid bone: impact of a new practice where the images are read by radiographers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30266
Source
Acad Radiol. 2004 Jul;11(7):724-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Jakob M Moller
Lone Larsen
Jan Bovin
Gunnar S Lausten
Maria Hasselqvist
Claus Munk Jensen
Ian Ropke
Henrik S Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Acad Radiol. 2004 Jul;11(7):724-8
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Clinical Competence
Cost Savings
Costs and Cost Analysis
Denmark
Diagnostic Errors
Emergency Service, Hospital - economics
Female
Fractures, Bone - diagnosis - economics - radiography
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Radiology
Scaphoid Bone - injuries - pathology - radiography
Abstract
RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) radiographers are able to evaluate MRI examinations with regard to scaphoid fractures to save patients unnecessary immobilization and clinical and radiographic examinations, and to reduce the costs for the hospital as well as society in general. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a 1-year period 224 consecutive patients with a suspected clinical scaphoid fracture but negative radiography were referred for MRI and examined within 11 hours. The MR images were primarily evaluated by the MRI radiographer on duty. Other fractures and bone edema were not reported because these were not part of the work-up protocol agreed upon by the radiology and the orthopedic departments. The following weekday a final report was provided by a radiologist. For the economical analysis the official price-list for Danish hospital service was used. RESULTS: The MRI radiographers reported 43 scaphoid fractures, whereas the radiologist ultimately diagnosed only 36 scaphoid fractures (16.1% of patients) (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 96.3%). Six of the seven false-positive fractures occurred in patients with edema of the scaphoid. The seventh false-positive was a fracture of the capitate. The hospital saved at least 20,000 and the social care system 70.000. CONCLUSION: It is possible to provide an acute MRI service to patients with clinically suspected fracture of the scaphoid and a normal plain radiograph. The MR images can be primarily read by sufficiently trained MR radiographers. This new work-up protocol reduces the cost for society.
PubMed ID
15217588 View in PubMed
Less detail

MR spectroscopy of liver in overweight children and adolescents: investigation of ¹H T2 relaxation times at 3T.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136447
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2012 May;81(5):811-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Elizaveta Chabanova
Dorthe S Bille
Ebbe Thisted
Jens-Christian Holm
Henrik S Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark. elcha@heh.regionh.dk
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2012 May;81(5):811-4
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Algorithms
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods - statistics & numerical data
Male
Overweight - epidemiology - physiopathology
Protons - diagnostic use
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The objective was to investigate T(2) relaxation values and to optimize hepatic fat quantification using proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 3T in overweight and obese children and adolescents.
The study included 123 consecutive children and adolescents with a body mass index above the 97th percentile according to age and sex. (1)H MR spectroscopy was performed at 3.0 T using point resolved spectroscopy sequence with series TE. T(2) relaxation values and hepatic fat content corrected for the T(2) relaxation effects were calculated.
T(2) values for water ranged from 22 ms to 42 ms (mean value 28 ms) and T(2) values for fat ranged from 36 ms to 99 ms (mean value 64 ms). Poor correlation was observed: (1) between T(2) relaxation times of fat and T(2) relaxation times of water (correlation coefficient r=0.038, P=0.79); (2) between T(2) relaxation times of fat and fat content (r=0.057, P=0.69); (3) between T(2) relaxation times of water and fat content (r=0.160, P=0.26). Correlation between fat peak content and the T(2) corrected fat content decreased with increasing echo time TE: r=0.97 for TE=45, r=0.93 for TE=75, r=0.89 for TE=105, P
PubMed ID
21377308 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in Denmark--a nationwide investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256899
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82037
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Tina R Elmholdt
Anne B B Olesen
Bettina Jørgensen
Stinne Kvist
Lone Skov
Henrik S Thomsen
Peter Marckmann
Michael Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark ; Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82037
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Contrast Media - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gadolinium DTPA - adverse effects
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrogenic Fibrosing Dermopathy - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Prevalence
Renal Dialysis
Renal Insufficiency - diagnosis - pathology
Skin - pathology
Abstract
Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a debilitating and painful disorder with an increased stimulation of the connective tissue in the skin and systemic tissues. The disease is associated with exposure to gadolinium-based contrast agent used in magnetic resonance imaging in patients with renal impairment.
The prevalence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis has so far never been determined at a national level. In 2009, Denmark was the first country to design a guideline for the tracing of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis patients. The aim of this paper is to communicate the main findings of this quest.
The outcome of the nationwide investigation revealed that Denmark had 65 patients with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and thereby the highest prevalence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis worldwide with 65 per 5.6 million inhabitants, or 12 per million.
The nationwide investigation in Denmark revealed the highest prevalence of NSF worldwide. This may be rooted in a high level of awareness of NSF both among doctors, politicians and, not least, the media, combined with the fact that a nationwide NSF investigation was initiated.
Notes
Cites: Muscle Nerve. 2004 Nov;30(5):569-7715389718
Cites: Am J Dermatopathol. 2001 Oct;23(5):383-9311801769
Cites: Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2006 Feb;35(4):238-4916461069
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2006 Apr;21(4):1104-816431890
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Sep;17(9):2359-6216885403
Cites: Radiology. 2007 Oct;245(1):168-7517704357
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Oct;56(10):3433-4117907148
Cites: Invest Radiol. 2008 Feb;43(2):141-418197066
Cites: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2008 Mar;190(3):736-4118287446
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Feb 21;358(8):827-3818287606
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Feb 18;170(8):65518364161
Cites: Clin Nephrol. 2008 Mar;69(3):161-818397714
Cites: Eur J Radiol. 2008 May;66(2):191-918325705
Cites: Kidney Int. 2008 Jun;73(12):1413-818401336
Cites: J Nephrol. 2008 May-Jun;21(3):324-3618587720
Cites: Radiology. 2009 Feb;250(2):371-719188312
Cites: Lancet. 2000 Sep 16;356(9234):1000-111041404
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2012 Dec;27(12):1697-70322692632
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Feb 20;287(7):83811862962
Cites: Arch Dermatol. 2003 Jul;139(7):903-612873886
Cites: Arch Dermatol. 2009 Feb;145(2):183-719221265
Cites: Radiol Clin North Am. 2009 Sep;47(5):833-40, vi19744598
Cites: Radiology. 2009 Oct;253(1):81-919709997
Cites: Arch Dermatol. 2009 Oct;145(10):1095-10219841395
Cites: Eur Radiol. 2010 Mar;20(3):595-60319760239
Cites: Invest Radiol. 2009 Mar;44(3):135-919151610
Cites: Nephrology (Carlton). 2011 Feb;16(2):243-821272139
Cites: Br J Dermatol. 2011 Oct;165(4):828-3621692765
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2011 Nov;26(11):3616-2621441397
Cites: Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2012 Feb;46(1):48-5322008005
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2012 Aug;26(4):489-50323040363
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1998 Jan;25(1):84-89458208
PubMed ID
24349178 View in PubMed
Less detail

Plain magnetic resonance imaging as an alternative in evaluating inflammation and bowel damage in inflammatory bowel disease--a prospective comparison with conventional magnetic resonance follow-through.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269617
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2015 May;50(5):519-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Kayalvily Jesuratnam-Nielsen
Vibeke B Løgager
Bijan Rezanavaz-Gheshlagh
Pia Munkholm
Henrik S Thomsen
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2015 May;50(5):519-27
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colitis, Ulcerative - diagnosis
Contrast Media - administration & dosage
Crohn Disease - diagnosis
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Young Adult
Abstract
To compare prospectively the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without use of contrast medium orally or intravenously (plain MRI) with magnetic resonance follow-through (MRFT) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
Plain MRI was carried out in addition to MRFT, to which the patients were referred. All patients underwent both examinations on the same day. For the evaluation, the bowel was divided into nine segments. Two radiologists, blinded to clinical findings, evaluated bowel wall thickness, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), and other inflammatory changes in each bowel segments. Further, hyperenhancement of the bowel was also evaluated in MRFT.
A total of 100 patients (40 males and 60 females; median age: 38.5; range: 19-90) were enrolled; 44 with Crohn's disease (CD), 25 with ulcerative colitis (UC), 24 with IBD unclassified (IBD-U), and 7 had other diagnosis. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in CD ranged 50-86%, 93-94%, and 91-92% for wall thickening and 49-82%, 85-93%, and 84-89% for DWI, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in UC range 0-40%, 87-100%, and 80-100% for wall thickening and 0-52%, 83-94% and 76-92% for DWI, respectively. The ? values for bowel wall thickening, DWI, and mural hyperenhancement were detected with fair agreement (? = 0.26-0.39) at both MRI examinations, whereas only bowel wall thickening in MRFT were detected with moderate agreement (? = 0.47) Conclusion. Plain MRI cannot currently replace MRFT in the workup of patients with IBD. Further research on plain MRI is needed to improve the protocol.
PubMed ID
25592192 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The free choice of hospital and diagnostic imaging in cancer]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18855
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Sep 2;164(36):4194-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-2002
Author
Jens Karstoft
Finn Rasmussen
Henrik S Thomsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Sep 2;164(36):4194-5
Date
Sep-2-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diagnostic Imaging
Humans
Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Patient Rights
Practice Guidelines
Waiting Lists
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 May 27;164(22):2901-1212082819
PubMed ID
12362839 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.