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Determinants of plasma PCB, brominated flame retardants, and organochlorine pesticides in pregnant women and 3 year old children in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273849
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Apr;146:136-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ida Henriette Caspersen
Helen Engelstad Kvalem
Margaretha Haugen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Cathrine Thomsen
May Frøshaug
Nanna Margrethe Bruun Bremnes
Sharon Lynn Broadwell
Berit Granum
Manolis Kogevinas
Helle Katrine Knutsen
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Apr;146:136-44
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Demography
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Flame Retardants - metabolism
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Brominated - blood
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Life Style
Norway
Pesticides - blood
Polybrominated Biphenyls - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Pregnancy
Abstract
Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) during prenatal and postnatal life has been extensively studied in relation to adverse health effects in children.
The aim was to identify determinants of the concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers, PBDEs; polybrominated biphenyl, PBB), and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in blood samples from pregnant women and children in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
Blood samples were collected from two independent subsamples within MoBa; a group of women (n=96) enrolled in mid-pregnancy during the years 2002-2008 and a group of 3 year old children (n=99) participating during 2010-2011. PCB congeners (74, 99, 138, 153, 180, 170, 194, 209, 105, 114, 118, 156, 157, 167, and 189), brominated flame retardants (PBDE-28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, and PBB-153), as well as the OCPs hexachlorobenzene (HCB), oxychlordane, 4,4'dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and 4,4'dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) were measured in both pregnant women and children.
Age, low parity, and low pre-pregnant BMI were the most important determinants of increased plasma concentrations of POPs in pregnant women. In 3 year old children, prolonged breastfeeding duration was a major determinant of increased POP concentrations. Estimated dietary exposure to PCBs during pregnancy was positively associated with plasma concentrations in 3 year old children, but not in pregnant women. Plasma concentrations were approximately 40% higher in children compared to pregnant women.
Several factors associated with exposure and toxicokinetics, i.e. accumulation, excretion and transfer via breastmilk of POPs were the main predictors of POP levels in pregnant women and children. Diet, which is the main exposure source for these compounds in the general population, was found to predict PCB levels only among children. For the PBDEs, for which non-dietary sources are more important, toxicokinetic factors appeared to have less predictive impact.
PubMed ID
26749444 View in PubMed
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Inadequate Iodine Intake in Population Groups Defined by Age, Life Stage and Vegetarian Dietary Practice in a Norwegian Convenience Sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294675
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Feb 17; 10(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-17-2018
Author
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Katrine Knutsen
Nina Cathrine Johansen
Kristine Aastad Nyheim
Iris Erlund
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Sigrun Henjum
Author Affiliation
Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo 0403, Norway. AnneLise.Brantsaeter@fhi.no.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Feb 17; 10(2):
Date
Feb-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Biomarkers - urine
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Diet, Vegan
Diet, Vegetarian - adverse effects
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - deficiency - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutritional Status
Risk factors
Urinalysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Inadequate iodine intake has been identified in populations considered iodine replete for decades. The objective of the current study is to evaluate urinary iodine concentration (UIC) and the probability of adequate iodine intake in subgroups of the Norwegian population defined by age, life stage and vegetarian dietary practice. In a cross-sectional survey, we assessed the probability of adequate iodine intake by two 24-h food diaries and UIC from two fasting morning spot urine samples in 276 participants. The participants included children (n = 47), adolescents (n = 46), adults (n = 71), the elderly (n = 23), pregnant women (n = 45), ovo-lacto vegetarians (n = 25), and vegans (n = 19). In all participants combined, the median (95% CI) UIC was 101 (90, 110) µg/L, median (25th, 75th percentile) calculated iodine intake was 112 (77, 175) µg/day and median (25th, 75th percentile) estimated usual iodine intake was 101 (75, 150) µg/day. According to WHOs criteria for evaluation of median UIC, iodine intake was inadequate in the elderly, pregnant women, vegans and non-pregnant women of childbearing age. Children had the highest (82%) and vegans the lowest (14%) probability of adequate iodine intake according to reported food and supplement intakes. This study confirms the need for monitoring iodine intake and status in nationally representative study samples in Norway.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29462974 View in PubMed
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Maternal intake of seafood and supplementary long chain n-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids and preterm delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290099
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 Jan 19; 17(1):41
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-19-2017
Author
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Linda Englund-Ögge
Margareta Haugen
Bryndis Eva Birgisdottir
Helle Katrine Knutsen
Verena Sengpiel
Ronny Myhre
Jan Alexander
Roy M Nilsen
Bo Jacobsson
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Exposure and Epidemiology, Domain of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, Nydalen, NO-0403, Oslo, Norway. AnneLise.Brantsaeter@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 Jan 19; 17(1):41
Date
Jan-19-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Diet Surveys - methods
Dietary Supplements - statistics & numerical data
Eating
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - therapeutic use
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Seafood - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Preterm delivery increases the risk of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Studies suggest that maternal diet may affect the prevalence of preterm delivery. The aim of this study was to assess whether maternal intakes of seafood and marine long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA) from supplements were associated with preterm delivery.
The study population included 67,007 women from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Maternal food and supplement intakes were assessed by a validated self-reported food frequency questionnaire in mid-pregnancy. Information about gestational duration was obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations between total seafood, lean fish, fatty fish, and LCn-3PUFA intakes and preterm delivery. Preterm was defined as any onset of delivery before gestational week 37, and as spontaneous or iatrogenic deliveries and as preterm delivery at early, moderate, and late preterm gestations.
Lean fish constituted 56%, fatty fish 34% and shellfish 10% of seafood intake. Any intake of seafood above no/rare intake (>5 g/d) was associated with lower prevalence of preterm delivery. Adjusted HRs were 0.76 (CI: 0.66, 0.88) for 1-2 servings/week (20-40 g/d), 0.72 (CI: 0.62, 0.83) for 2-3 servings/week (40-60 g/d), and 0.72 (CI: 0.61, 0.85) for =3 servings/week (>60 g/d), p-trend
Notes
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ErratumIn: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 Feb 10;17 (1):61 PMID 28187761
PubMed ID
28103845 View in PubMed
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Prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins from the maternal diet may be associated with immunosuppressive effects that persist into early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120128
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2013 Jan;51:165-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Solvor Berntsen Stølevik
Unni Cecilie Nygaard
Ellen Namork
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Helle Katrine Knutsen
Ingeborg Aaberge
Kirsti Vainio
Henk van Loveren
Martinus Løvik
Berit Granum
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. solvor.berntsen@fhi.no
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2013 Jan;51:165-72
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibody formation
Child, Preschool
Dioxins - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Infant
Maternal Exposure
Measles Vaccine - immunology
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated whether prenatal exposure from the maternal diet to the toxicants polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins is associated with the development of immune-related diseases in childhood. Children participating in BraMat, a sub-cohort of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), were followed in the three first years of life using annual questionnaires (0-3years; n=162, 2-3years; n=180), and blood parameters were examined at three years of age (n=114). The maternal intake of the toxicants was calculated using a validated food frequency questionnaire from MoBa. Maternal exposure to PCBs and dioxins was found to be associated with an increased risk of wheeze and more frequent upper respiratory tract infections. Furthermore, maternal exposure to PCBs and dioxins was found to be associated with reduced antibody response to a measles vaccine. No associations were found between prenatal exposure and immunophenotype data, allergic sensitization and vaccine-induced antibody responses other than measles. Our results suggest that prenatal dietary exposure to PCBs and dioxins may increase the risk of wheeze and the susceptibility to infectious diseases in early childhood.
PubMed ID
23036451 View in PubMed
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Prenatal mercury exposure, maternal seafood consumption and associations with child language at five years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290353
Source
Environ Int. 2018 01; 110:71-79
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Kristine Vejrup
Ragnhild Eek Brandlistuen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Katrine Knutsen
Ida Henriette Caspersen
Jan Alexander
Thomas Lundh
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Per Magnus
Margaretha Haugen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Postbox 4404, Nydalen, NO 0403 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: Kristine.Vejrup@fhi.no.
Source
Environ Int. 2018 01; 110:71-79
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Language Development Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Mercury - analysis - blood - toxicity
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Seafood - analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Methyl mercury (MeHg) is a well-known neurotoxin and evidence suggests that also low level exposure may affect prenatal neurodevelopment. Uncertainty exists as to whether the maternal MeHg burden in Norway might affect child neurodevelopment.
To evaluate the association between prenatal mercury exposure, maternal seafood consumption and child language and communication skills at age five.
The study sample comprised 38,581 mother-child pairs in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Maternal mercury blood concentration in gestational week 17 was analysed in a sub-sample of 2239 women. Prenatal mercury exposure from maternal diet was calculated from a validated FFQ answered in mid-pregnancy. Mothers reported children's language and communications skills at age five by a questionnaire including questions from the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ), the Speech and Language Assessment Scale (SLAS) and the Twenty Statements about Language-Related Difficulties (language 20). We performed linear regression analyses adjusting for maternal characteristics, nutritional status and socioeconomic factors.
Median maternal blood mercury concentration was 1.03µg/L, dietary mercury exposure was 0.15µg/kgbw/wk, and seafood intake was 217g/wk. Blood mercury concentrations were not associated with any language and communication scales. Increased dietary mercury exposure was significantly associated with improved SLAS scores when mothers had a seafood intake below 400g/wk in the adjusted analysis. Sibling matched analysis showed a small significant adverse association between those above the 90th percentile dietary mercury exposure and the SLAS scores. Maternal seafood intake during pregnancy was positively associated with the language and communication scales.
Low levels of prenatal mercury exposure were positively associated with language and communication skills at five years. However, the matched sibling analyses suggested an adverse association between mercury and child language skills in the highest exposure group. This indicates that prenatal low level mercury exposure still needs our attention.
PubMed ID
29089166 View in PubMed
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Prenatal methylmercury exposure and language delay at three years of age in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283314
Source
Environ Int. 2016 Jul-Aug;92-93:63-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kristine Vejrup
Synnve Schjølberg
Helle Katrine Knutsen
Helen Engelstad Kvalem
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Per Magnus
Margaretha Haugen
Source
Environ Int. 2016 Jul-Aug;92-93:63-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Diet
Dioxins - analysis - toxicity
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - analysis
Female
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Gestational Age
Humans
Language Development Disorders - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Methylmercury Compounds - analysis - toxicity
Norway - epidemiology
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced
Prospective Studies
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Prenatal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure and its possible neurodevelopmental effects in susceptible children are of concern. Studies of MeHg exposure and negative health outcomes have shown conflicting results and it has been suggested that co-exposure to other contaminants and/or nutrients in fish may confound the effect of MeHg. Our objective was to examine the association between prenatal exposure to MeHg and language and communication development at three years, adjusting for intake of fish, n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFAs) and co-exposure to dioxins and dioxin like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs). We used data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) collected between 2002 and 2008. The study sample consisted of 46,750 mother-child pairs. MeHg exposure was calculated from reported fish intake during pregnancy by a FFQ in mid-pregnancy. Children's language and communication skills were measured by maternal report on the Dale and Bishop grammar rating and the Ages and Stages communication scale (ASQ). We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using logistic regressions. Median MeHg exposure was 1.3µg/day, corresponding to 0.14µg/kgbw/week. An exposure level above the 90th percentile (>2.6µg/day, >0.29µg/kgbw/week) was defined as the high MeHg exposure. Results indicated an association between high MeHg exposure and unintelligible speech with an adjusted OR 2.22 (1.31, 3.72). High MeHg exposure was also associated with weaker communication skills adjusted OR 1.33 (1.03, 1.70). Additional adjustment for fish intake strengthened the associations, while adjusting for PCBs and n-3 LCPUFA from diet or from supplements had minor impact. In conclusion, significant associations were found between prenatal MeHg exposure above the 90th percentile and delayed language and communication skills in a generally low exposed population.
PubMed ID
27058928 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.