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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Dietary exposure to brominated flame retardants correlates with male blood levels in a selected group of Norwegians with a wide range of seafood consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159000
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2008 Feb;52(2):217-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Helle K Knutsen
Helen E Kvalem
Cathrine Thomsen
May Frøshaug
Margaretha Haugen
Georg Becher
Jan Alexander
Helle M Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. helle.knutsen@fhi.no
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2008 Feb;52(2):217-27
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet
Female
Flame Retardants - administration & dosage - analysis
Food contamination - analysis
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Brominated - administration & dosage - analysis - blood
Male
Norway
Polybrominated Biphenyls - administration & dosage - analysis - blood
Seafood - analysis
Abstract
This study investigates dietary exposure and serum levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in a group of Norwegians (n = 184) with a wide range of seafood consumption (4-455 g/day). Mean dietary exposure to Sum 5 PBDEs (1.5 ng/kg body weight/day) is among the highest reported. Since concentrations in foods were similar to those found elsewhere in Europe, this may be explained by high seafood consumption among Norwegians. Oily fish was the main dietary contributor both to Sum PBDEs and to the considerably lower HBCD intake (0.3 ng/kg body weight/day). Milk products appeared to contribute most to the BDE-209 intake (1.4 ng/kg body weight/day). BDE-209 and HBCD exposures are based on few food samples and need to be confirmed. Serum levels (mean Sum 7 PBDEs = 5.2 ng/g lipid) and congener patterns (BDE-47 > BDE-153 > BDE-99) were comparable with other European reports. Correlations between individual congeners were higher for the calculated dietary exposure than for serum levels. Further, significant but weak correlations were found between dietary exposure and serum levels for Sum PBDEs, BDE-47, and BDE-28 in males. This indicates that other sources in addition to diet need to be addressed.
PubMed ID
18246586 View in PubMed
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Dietary exposure to dioxins and PCBs in a large cohort of pregnant women: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108262
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:398-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Ida H Caspersen
Helle K Knutsen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Helen E Kvalem
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ida.henriette.caspersen@fhi.no
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:398-407
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Burden
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Dioxins - administration & dosage - blood
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - administration & dosage - analysis - blood
Female
Fish Products - adverse effects - analysis
Food Contamination
Humans
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - administration & dosage - blood
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Exposure to dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) during pregnancy and breastfeeding may result in adverse health effects in children. Prenatal exposure is determined by the concentrations of dioxins and PCBs in maternal blood, which reflect the body burden obtained by long term dietary exposure. The aims of this study were (1) to describe dietary exposure and important dietary sources to dioxins and PCBs in a large group of pregnant women and (2) to identify maternal characteristics associated with high dietary exposure to dioxins and PCBs. Dietary exposure to dioxins (sum of toxic equivalents (TEQs) from dioxin-like (dl) compounds) and PCB-153 in 83,524 pregnant women (gestational weeks 17-22) who participated in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) during the years 2002-2009 was calculated based on a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and a database of dioxin and PCB concentrations in Norwegian food. The median (interquartile range, IQR) intake of PCB-153 (marker of ndl-PCBs) was 0.81 (0.77) ng/kg bw/day. For dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs, the median (IQR) intake was 0.56 (0.37) pg TEQ/kg bw/day. Moreover, 2.3% of the participants had intakes exceeding the tolerable weekly intake (TWI) of 14pg TEQ/kg bw/week. Multiple regression analysis showed that dietary exposure was positively associated with maternal age, maternal education, weight gain during pregnancy, being a student, and alcohol consumption during pregnancy and negatively associated with pre-pregnancy BMI and smoking. A high dietary exposure to PCB-153 or dl-compounds (TEQ) was mainly explained by the consumption of seagull eggs and/or pate with fish liver and roe. Women who according to Norwegian recommendations avoid these food items generally do not have dietary exposure above the tolerable intake of dioxins and dl-PCBs.
PubMed ID
23911340 View in PubMed
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Fish liver and seagull eggs, vitamin D-rich foods with a shadow: results from the Norwegian Fish and Game Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127159
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012 Mar;56(3):388-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Bryndis E Birgisdottir
Anne L Brantsaeter
Helen E Kvalem
Helle K Knutsen
Margaretha Haugen
Jan Alexander
Ragna B Hetland
Lage Aksnes
Helle M Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. bryndis.eva.birgisdottir@fhi.no
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012 Mar;56(3):388-98
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Charadriiformes
Databases, Factual
Diet
Dioxins - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Eggs
Female
Fish Oils - administration & dosage
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Liver - chemistry
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Questionnaires
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analysis
Vitamins - administration & dosage - analysis
Abstract
Fish liver, fish liver oil, oily fish and seagull eggs have been major sources of vitamin D for the coastal population of Norway. They also provide dioxin and polychlorinated dioxin-like compounds (dl-compounds), which may interfere with vitamin D homeostasis. We investigated whether serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) might be compromised by concomitant intake of dl-compounds.
We studied 182 adults participating in the Norwegian Fish and Game Study. Participants who consumed fish liver and/or seagull eggs had higher dl-compound intake and blood concentrations than non-consumers (p
PubMed ID
22319024 View in PubMed
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Maternal dietary intake of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls and birth size in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107028
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:209-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Eleni Papadopoulou
Ida H Caspersen
Helen E Kvalem
Helle K Knutsen
Talita Duarte-Salles
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Manolis Kogevinas
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: eleni.papadopoulou@fhi.no.
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:209-16
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Dioxins - analysis
Eating
Female
Fetal Development
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Seafood - analysis
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Maternal diet not only provides essential nutrients to the developing fetus but is also a source of prenatal exposure to environmental contaminants. We investigated the association between dietary intake of dioxins and PCBs during pregnancy and birth size. The study included 50,651 women from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Dietary information was collected by FFQs and intake estimates were calculated by combining food consumption and food concentration of dioxins, dioxin-like PCBs and non-dioxin-like PCBs. We used multivariable regression models to estimate the association between dietary intake of dioxins and PCBs and fetal growth. The contribution of fish and seafood intake during pregnancy was 41% for dietary dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs and 49% for dietary non-dioxin-like PCBs. Further stratified analysis by quartiles of seafood intake during pregnancy was conducted. We found an inverse dose-response association between dietary intake of dioxins and PCBs and fetal growth after adjustment for confounders. Newborns of mothers in the upper quartile of dioxin and dioxin-like PCBs intake had 62g lower birth weight (95% CI: -73, -50), 0.26cm shorter birth length (95% CI: -0.31, -0.20) and 0.10cm shorter head circumference (95% CI: -0.14, -0.06) than newborns of mothers in the lowest quartile of intake. Similar negative associations for intake of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs were found after excluding women with intakes above the tolerable weekly intake (TWI=14pg TEQ/kg bw/week). The negative association of dietary dioxins and PCBs with fetal growth was weaker as seafood intake was increasing. No association was found between dietary dioxin and PCB intake and the risk for small-for-gestational age neonate. In conclusion, dietary intakes of dioxins and PCBs during pregnancy were negatively associated with fetal growth, even at intakes below the TWI.
PubMed ID
24071022 View in PubMed
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Prenatal mercury exposure and infant birth weight in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263497
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Sep;17(9):2071-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Kristine Vejrup
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle K Knutsen
Per Magnus
Jan Alexander
Helen E Kvalem
Helle M Meltzer
Margaretha Haugen
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Sep;17(9):2071-80
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Weight - drug effects
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - chemically induced - epidemiology - ethnology
Food Contamination
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - ethnology
Mercury - analysis - toxicity
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - ethnology
Prospective Studies
Risk
Seafood - adverse effects - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
To examine the association between calculated maternal dietary exposure to Hg in pregnancy and infant birth weight in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
Exposure was calculated with use of a constructed database of Hg in food items and reported dietary intake during pregnancy. Multivariable regression models were used to explore the association between maternal Hg exposure and infant birth weight, and to model associations with small-for-gestational-age offspring.
The study is based on data from MoBa.
The study sample consisted of 62 941 women who answered a validated FFQ which covered the habitual diet during the first five months of pregnancy.
Median exposure to Hg was 0·15 µg/kg body weight per week and the contribution from seafood intake was 88 % of total Hg exposure. Women in the highest quintile compared with the lowest quintile of Hg exposure delivered offspring with 34 g lower birth weight (95 % CI -46 g, -22 g) and had an increased risk of giving birth to small-for-gestational-age offspring, adjusted OR = 1·19 (95 % CI 1·08, 1·30). Although seafood intake was positively associated with increased birth weight, stratified analyses showed negative associations between Hg exposure and birth weight within strata of seafood intake.
Although seafood intake in pregnancy is positively associated with birth weight, Hg exposure is negatively associated with birth weight. Seafood consumption during pregnancy should not be avoided, but clarification is needed to identify at what level of Hg exposure this risk might exceed the benefits of seafood.
PubMed ID
24103413 View in PubMed
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Role of dietary patterns for dioxin and PCB exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147852
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2009 Nov;53(11):1438-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Helen E Kvalem
Helle K Knutsen
Cathrine Thomsen
Margaretha Haugen
Hein Stigum
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
May Frøshaug
Nina Lohmann
Olaf Päpke
Georg Becher
Jan Alexander
Helle M Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. helen.engelstad@fhi.no
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2009 Nov;53(11):1438-51
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Benzofurans - administration & dosage - blood
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - administration & dosage - blood
Polymers - administration & dosage
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Dietary patterns were related to intake and blood concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDFs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) and selected non-dioxin-like-PCBs (ndl-PCBs). Intake calculations were based on an extensive food frequency questionnaire and a congener-specific database on concentrations in Norwegian foods. The study (2003) applied a two-step inclusion strategy recruiting representative (n=73) and high consumers (n=111) of seafood and game. Estimated median intakes of sum PCDD/PCDFs and dl-PCBs of the representative and high consumers were 0.78 and 1.25 pg toxic equivalents (TEQ)/kg bw/day, respectively. Estimated median intakes of ndl-PCBs (sum chlorinated biphenyl (CB)-28, 52, 101, 138, 153, 180) were 4.26 and 6.40 ng/kg bw/day. The median blood concentrations of PCDD/PCDFs/dl-PCBs were 28.7 and 35.1 pg TEQ/g lipid, and ndl-PCBs (sum of CB-101, 138, 153 and 180) 252 and 299 ng/g lipid. The Spearman correlations between dietary intake and serum concentration were r=0.34 (p=0.017) for dl-compounds and r=0.37 (p
PubMed ID
19842105 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.