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A concept to empower self-management of psychophysiological wellbeing: preliminary user study experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146911
Source
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2009;2009:312-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Antti P Happonen
Kirsikka Kaipainen
Antti Väätänen
Marja-Liisa Kinnunen
Tero Myllymäki
Päivi Lappalainen
Henna Tuomela
Heikki Rusko
Elina Mattila
Raimo Lappalainen
Ilkka Korhonen
Author Affiliation
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland. antti.happonen@vtt.fi
Source
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2009;2009:312-5
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Finland
Humans
Patient Participation - methods
Pilot Projects
Power (Psychology)
Psychophysiologic Disorders - rehabilitation
Self Care - methods
Abstract
In prevention of chronic diseases, health promotion and early interventions based on self-management should be emphasized. Mental health problems and stress cause a significant portion of healthcare costs, and also complicate the management of other chronic conditions. In addition to physical health, psychophysiological and social wellbeing should be equally promoted. Thus, we have previously designed and reported the P4Well or Pervasive Personal and PsychoPhysiological management of WELLness concept for working-age citizens. The concept supports the stress and recovery management on a daily basis through improved health management strategies, and combines psychological methods with personal health technologies. In this paper, we discuss the preliminary user study experiences of ongoing evaluations with two different user groups consisting of: 1) middle-aged men who are using the concept for managing their mental wellbeing or mild depression; and 2) entrepreneurs who are using the concept for coping with stress. Our results provide a preliminary assessment of the role and importance of experts, technologies, and peer-support in the concept.
PubMed ID
19964215 View in PubMed
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Physical activity, body mass index and heart rate variability-based stress and recovery in 16 275 Finnish employees: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284185
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 02;16:701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-02-2016
Author
Tiina Föhr
Julia Pietilä
Elina Helander
Tero Myllymäki
Harri Lindholm
Heikki Rusko
Urho M Kujala
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 02;16:701
Date
Aug-02-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment
Exercise - physiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - physiopathology - psychology
Overweight
Self Report
Sleep - physiology
Stress, Psychological - physiopathology - prevention & control
Work
Abstract
Physical inactivity, overweight, and work-related stress are major concerns today. Psychological stress causes physiological responses such as reduced heart rate variability (HRV), owing to attenuated parasympathetic and/or increased sympathetic activity in cardiac autonomic control. This study's purpose was to investigate the relationships between physical activity (PA), body mass index (BMI), and HRV-based stress and recovery on workdays, among Finnish employees.
The participants in this cross-sectional study were 16 275 individuals (6863 men and 9412 women; age 18-65 years; BMI 18.5-40.0 kg/m(2)). Assessments of stress, recovery and PA were based on HRV data from beat-to-beat R-R interval recording (mainly over 3 days). The validated HRV-derived variables took into account the dynamics and individuality of HRV. Stress percentage (the proportion of stress reactions, workday and working hours), and stress balance (ratio between recovery and stress reactions, sleep) describe the amount of physiological stress and recovery, respectively. Variables describing the intensity (i.e. magnitude of recognized reactions) of physiological stress and recovery were stress index (workday) and recovery index (sleep), respectively. Moderate to vigorous PA was measured and participants divided into the following groups, based on calculated weekly PA: inactive (0 min), low (0?300 min). BMI was calculated from self-reported weight and height. Linear models were employed in the main analyses.
High PA was associated with lower stress percentages (during workdays and working hours) and stress balance. Higher BMI was associated with higher stress index, and lower stress balance and recovery index. These results were similar for men and women (P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
27484470 View in PubMed
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