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Source
Can Nurse. 2012 Sep;108(7):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Heidi Smith
Caroline Saunders
Author Affiliation
Health and Performance Centre, University of Guelph.
Source
Can Nurse. 2012 Sep;108(7):30-1
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diet
Fruit
Humans
Nutritional Requirements
Vegetables
PubMed ID
23094503 View in PubMed
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Interventions for prevention of otitis media may be most effective if implemented in the first weeks of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160310
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2008 Jan;72(1):57-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Heidi Smith-Vaughan
Roy Byun
Stephen Halpin
Mangala A Nadkarni
Nicholas A Jacques
Neil Hunter
Peter S Morris
Amanda J Leach
Author Affiliation
Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Australia. heidi@menzies.edu.au
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2008 Jan;72(1):57-61
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Nasopharynx - microbiology
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Otitis Media - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Abstract
For Indigenous Australian children living in remote communities, onset of otitis media commences within weeks of birth and is associated with early nasopharyngeal colonisation with multiple respiratory bacterial pathogens: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. The high prevalence of eardrum perforation and the failure of standard therapies to cure or prevent OM in this population require urgent attention. The objective of this study was to measure the changes in nasopharyngeal bacterial flora between birth and first episode of otitis media.
For 10 randomly selected Indigenous children with early onset otitis media, S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, S. aureus, and total bacterial load were enumerated in serial nasopharyngeal swabs using real-time quantitative PCR.
Between 0 and 3 weeks of age, all 10 infants had bilaterally normal ears. At 3-6 weeks of age, seven of eight infants examined had otitis media. By 6-13 weeks of age, all 10 infants had otitis media. The relative density of respiratory pathogens among total nasopharyngeal flora increased significantly with onset of otitis media, and the majority of children became colonised with the three respiratory pathogens. There was no association between OM onset and S. aureus load.
Onset of otitis media between 3 and 6 weeks of life was associated with a significant increase in all major bacterial OM pathogens (S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis), as well as total bacterial load in the nasopharynx. Interventions to prevent acquisition of multiple OM pathogens in the first weeks of life are needed.
PubMed ID
18006084 View in PubMed
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